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Scholl Canyon Golf And Tennis Complex

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1988
A plan to spend as much as $5 million to control potentially explosive emissions of methane gas at the Scholl Canyon Golf and Tennis Complex was approved Tuesday by the Glendale City Council. City officials ordered the facility closed last month after tests found that methane was leaking from the inactive landfill underneath the site and that a system to collect the gas was not functioning properly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE
Operators of Glendale's municipal golf course said this week they will start a driver-safety campaign and take other steps to curb neighboring residents' fears about the sale of alcoholic beverages at the course. City officials this week approved the Scholl Canyon Golf Course's conditional-use permit to sell beer and wine, despite pleas from several members of the Glenoaks Canyon Homeowners Assn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Potentially explosive levels of leaking methane have prompted Glendale officials to close a municipal golf and tennis complex built on top of a landfill. The city's Scholl Canyon Golf and Tennis Complex will remain closed indefinitely until officials can determine the severity of the problem and correct it, Glendale City Manager David Ramsay said.
SPORTS
December 25, 1994 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No doubt about it, Scholl Canyon Golf Course is to golf what Picasso was to painting. Eclectic, weird, an acquired taste. Strange angles, wondrous sight lines. Bring extra balls, a sense of humor and a seat belt to the first tee. Quirky Scholl, situated atop a panoramic bluff overlooking Los Angeles, Griffith Park and the Santa Monica Bay, is a wild ride, but may not be for everybody. Designers managed to squeeze 18 executive holes into approximately 60 acres.
SPORTS
July 6, 1994 | STEVE ELLING
Think it's hot now? Imagine the possibilities not so long ago at Scholl Canyon Golf Course in Glendale. A golfer crouches to line up his putt, eyes the hole, adjusts his cap, throws his cigarette to the ground. . . . and spontaneously ignites a white flash of fire. It could have happened. Four years ago, the Air Quality Management District shut down Scholl Canyon, built on a landfill site, because of methane gas seepage. Opening day is only four months away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE
Operators of Glendale's municipal golf course said this week they will start a driver-safety campaign and take other steps to curb neighboring residents' fears about the sale of alcoholic beverages at the course. City officials this week approved the Scholl Canyon Golf Course's conditional-use permit to sell beer and wine, despite pleas from several members of the Glenoaks Canyon Homeowners Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1993 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN
Construction began Tuesday for an 18-hole executive-length golf course at the problem-plagued Scholl Canyon Landfill where an earlier course was shut down because of explosive levels of leaking methane and constantly shifting greens. The $3.6-million course, to be built by American Golf Corp. of Santa Monica, is expected to be completed in June. The landscaping will mature for several months before the course is opened to the public Nov. 1, 1994, city and construction officials said.
SPORTS
December 25, 1994 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No doubt about it, Scholl Canyon Golf Course is to golf what Picasso was to painting. Eclectic, weird, an acquired taste. Strange angles, wondrous sight lines. Bring extra balls, a sense of humor and a seat belt to the first tee. Quirky Scholl, situated atop a panoramic bluff overlooking Los Angeles, Griffith Park and the Santa Monica Bay, is a wild ride, but may not be for everybody. Designers managed to squeeze 18 executive holes into approximately 60 acres.
SPORTS
December 25, 1994 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, Scholl Canyon Golf Course was dying. The body was decaying and it was hardly a secret. Golfers could smell Scholl Canyon before they reached the facility's parking lot. The stench from the course, built on a landfill site in the foothills overlooking Los Angeles, was indescribable. Eyes watered. Nasal passages burned. The foul air spawned bad jokes. Eau my gosh.
SPORTS
December 24, 1994 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scholl Canyon Golf Course was dying. The body was decaying and it was hardly a secret. Not long ago, golfers could smell Scholl Canyon before they reached the facility's parking lot. The stench from the course, built on a landfill site in the foothills overlooking Los Angeles, was almost indescribable. Eyes watered. Nasal passages burned. "The air was so rank, so foul, so thick, that you had to use an extra club to reach the green," said Kelly Magee of Montrose.
SPORTS
December 25, 1994 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, Scholl Canyon Golf Course was dying. The body was decaying and it was hardly a secret. Golfers could smell Scholl Canyon before they reached the facility's parking lot. The stench from the course, built on a landfill site in the foothills overlooking Los Angeles, was indescribable. Eyes watered. Nasal passages burned. The foul air spawned bad jokes. Eau my gosh.
SPORTS
December 24, 1994 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scholl Canyon Golf Course was dying. The body was decaying and it was hardly a secret. Not long ago, golfers could smell Scholl Canyon before they reached the facility's parking lot. The stench from the course, built on a landfill site in the foothills overlooking Los Angeles, was almost indescribable. Eyes watered. Nasal passages burned. "The air was so rank, so foul, so thick, that you had to use an extra club to reach the green," said Kelly Magee of Montrose.
SPORTS
July 6, 1994 | STEVE ELLING
Think it's hot now? Imagine the possibilities not so long ago at Scholl Canyon Golf Course in Glendale. A golfer crouches to line up his putt, eyes the hole, adjusts his cap, throws his cigarette to the ground. . . . and spontaneously ignites a white flash of fire. It could have happened. Four years ago, the Air Quality Management District shut down Scholl Canyon, built on a landfill site, because of methane gas seepage. Opening day is only four months away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1993 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN
Construction began Tuesday for an 18-hole executive-length golf course at the problem-plagued Scholl Canyon Landfill where an earlier course was shut down because of explosive levels of leaking methane and constantly shifting greens. The $3.6-million course, to be built by American Golf Corp. of Santa Monica, is expected to be completed in June. The landscaping will mature for several months before the course is opened to the public Nov. 1, 1994, city and construction officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1988
A plan to spend as much as $5 million to control potentially explosive emissions of methane gas at the Scholl Canyon Golf and Tennis Complex was approved Tuesday by the Glendale City Council. City officials ordered the facility closed last month after tests found that methane was leaking from the inactive landfill underneath the site and that a system to collect the gas was not functioning properly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Potentially explosive levels of leaking methane have prompted Glendale officials to close a municipal golf and tennis complex built on top of a landfill. The city's Scholl Canyon Golf and Tennis Complex will remain closed indefinitely until officials can determine the severity of the problem and correct it, Glendale City Manager David Ramsay said.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Glendale City Council this week appropriated $450,000 for preliminary work on a project to control potentially explosive emissions of methane at the Scholl Canyon Golf and Tennis Complex. The funds will be used for consulting services for engineering, design and development of specifications for repairing the complex, which has been closed since Sept. 29 after tests found gas leaking from the inactive landfill under the site.
NEWS
November 17, 1985
Glendale has agreed to spend $111,504 to repair tees, greens and a driving range at the city's Scholl Canyon Golf and Tennis Complex, where the golf course has been sinking and shifting since it was completed in 1981. Built atop a landfill, many of the once-gentle slopes of the course have shifted as much as 15 feet, becoming hills, dales and fissures.
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