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Scholl Canyon Landfill

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NEWS
April 11, 1993 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Scholl Canyon Golf Course, closed four years ago because of dangerous levels of methane leaking from the landfill below, will be rebuilt with a new 18-hole layout under a 40-year lease approved Tuesday by the Glendale City Council. American Golf Corp. of Santa Monica, the largest municipal golf course operator in the country, has agreed to spend $3.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1995 | DAVID FERRELL
Hundreds of times every working morning Tina de la Torre lifts up a lid and peeks into a trash can. In two weeks' time she covers the whole length and breadth of Pasadena, stopping every 100 feet or so in her city-owned truck. With every stop she hops out and moves quickly on foot, crisscrossing from curb to curb, dodging traffic. Every so often, the city's "green-waste inspector" finds a problem.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1987
Glendale officials Tuesday proposed a ban on the dumping of trash from Los Angeles at Scholl Canyon Landfill in order to lengthen the life of Glendale's only dump. Under an ordinance expected to be adopted by the Glendale City Council next week, both private and municipal waste haulers from Los Angeles would be prohibited from using the dump after Dec. 26. Private haulers from Burbank will also be forced to go elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1994 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the turn of a valve, gas created by garbage rotting at a local landfill was used to generate enough electricity for 30,000 homes Friday. It sounds like an environmentalist's dream, but the process is becoming a reality for municipalities across the country. Eight such systems are now being used at landfills and power plants throughout Los Angeles County, according to sanitation officials. Three of them, including Glendale's, are in the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1986 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Heeding complaints from private refuse haulers, Glendale City Council members said this week that they will rescind an ordinance that would have diverted hundreds of tons of trash from the city's Scholl Canyon landfill to San Fernando Valley landfills. Private haulers complained bitterly that the ordinance adopted in July would cost their customers more because of longer hauls, greater fuel consumption and long waits in lines at the remaining dumps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1994 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the turn of a valve Friday, gas created by garbage rotting at a local landfill was used to generate enough electricity for 30,000 homes in Glendale. It sounds like an environmentalist's dream, but the process is becoming a reality for municipalities across the country. Eight such systems are being used at landfills and power plants throughout Los Angeles County, according to sanitation officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1994 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the turn of a valve, gas created by garbage rotting at a local landfill was used to generate enough electricity for 30,000 homes Friday. It sounds like an environmentalist's dream, but the process is becoming a reality for municipalities across the country. Eight such systems are now being used at landfills and power plants throughout Los Angeles County, according to sanitation officials. Three of them, including Glendale's, are in the San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
November 26, 1986 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
Scientists studying 20 dumps in Southern California have concluded that ordinary landfills, intended for household trash but not hazardous waste, are sources of cancer-causing gases and other toxic chemicals, according to a South Coast Air Quality Management District report released Tuesday. Researchers with the agency said ground inspections at 17 of the dumps turned up significant levels of one or both of two chemicals known to cause cancer in humans: benzene and vinyl chloride.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Glendale city officials said they expect to ask more than 1,000 families in the northwest section to separate recyclable materials from the rest of their trash this fall, when the first city-sponsored curb-side recycling project gets under way. The purpose is to reduce the trash dumped into the city's Scholl Canyon landfill, which has become the center of a political dispute between Glendale and the City of Los Angeles. George A.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | ASHLEY DUNN, Times Staff Writer
A quickly disappearing supply of landfill space throughout the metropolitan Los Angeles area has prompted this city to explore building its own waste-to-energy plant in Pasadena and a 100-acre landfill in a neighboring city. City officials concede that the two proposals recommended to the Board of Directors in a study presented in March could provoke a furious response from San Gabriel Valley residents, who have opposed similar proposals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1994 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the turn of a valve Friday, gas created by garbage rotting at a local landfill was used to generate enough electricity for 30,000 homes in Glendale. It sounds like an environmentalist's dream, but the process is becoming a reality for municipalities across the country. Eight such systems are being used at landfills and power plants throughout Los Angeles County, according to sanitation officials.
SPORTS
July 6, 1994 | STEVE ELLING
Think it's hot now? Imagine the possibilities not so long ago at Scholl Canyon Golf Course in Glendale. A golfer crouches to line up his putt, eyes the hole, adjusts his cap, throws his cigarette to the ground. . . . and spontaneously ignites a white flash of fire. It could have happened. Four years ago, the Air Quality Management District shut down Scholl Canyon, built on a landfill site, because of methane gas seepage. Opening day is only four months away.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying it has no alternative, the City Council has authorized development plans for a proposed $15-million recycling plant at the Scholl Canyon Landfill. The plant, which is expected to be in operation by 1997, could reduce by almost 20% the amount of trash that is disposed of in the city's only landfill and prolong the life of the dump by three to five years, a team of consultants told the City Council Tuesday.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Scholl Canyon Golf Course, closed four years ago because of dangerous levels of methane leaking from the landfill below, will be rebuilt with a new 18-hole layout under a 40-year lease approved Tuesday by the Glendale City Council. American Golf Corp. of Santa Monica, the largest municipal golf course operator in the country, has agreed to spend $3.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Glendale City Council on Tuesday selected a Santa Monica firm to design, build and operate a golf course atop the city's problem-plagued Scholl Canyon landfill after another firm backed out of the proposal last month. American Golf Corp. proposes to spend $3.6 million to build an 18-hole executive-length course and driving range on top of the landfill at the eastern end of Glenoaks Boulevard in the San Rafael Hills. The course would be on about 56 acres of the 410-acre landfill.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The Glendale City Council has earmarked $845,000 to replace a faulty gas-collection system under what was once a portion of the Scholl Canyon landfill, where potentially dangerous emissions of methane gas were discovered in September. The council voted unanimously to accept a $709,166 bid from Valley Crest Landscape to dig up and remove the gas-collection pipes and burning equipment at the site.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The Glendale City Council has earmarked $845,000 to replace a faulty gas-collection system under what was once a portion of the Scholl Canyon landfill, where potentially dangerous emissions of methane gas were discovered in September. The council voted unanimously to accept a $709,166 bid from Valley Crest Landscape to dig up and remove the gas-collection pipes and burning equipment at the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1989 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Glendale officials Friday reignited three fiery torches that burn off methane gas leaking from a covered-over landfill, reversing a decision to extinguish the flames more than 24 hours earlier that briefly raised fears that the gas could gather in nearby areas and explode. Glendale officials put out the flares at about 7 p.m.
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