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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014
A sample of what L.A. County superintendents were paid in 2013 and the district enrollment: Jose Fernandez Centinela Valley $674,559; 6,637 John Deasy Los Angeles $393,106; 655,494 Gary W. Woods Beverly Hills $255,000; 4,515 Christopher Steinhauser Long Beach $251,155; 82,256 Cynthia Parulan-Colfer Hacienda La Puente $189,423; 20,358 Sources: state, county and district...
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SPORTS
April 27, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Rank, School (W-L) Comment (last week's ranking) 1. HARVARD-WESTLAKE (SS-Div. 1, 16-4-1) vs. Alemany, Tuesday (2) 2. FOUNTAIN VALLEY (SS-Div. 1, 15-6) vs. Newport Harbor, Wednesday (16) 3. LONG BEACH WILSON (SS-Div. 1, 20-4) at Lakewood (Blair Field), Monday (6) 4. JSERRA (SS-Div. 1, 15-5) at Servite, Tuesday (3) 5. HART (SS-Div. 1, 16-3-1) at West Ranch, Wednesday (5) 6. HUNTINGTON BEACH (SS-Div. 1, 15-4) at Marina, Wednesday (1) 7. GREAT OAK (SS-Div.
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OPINION
December 8, 2012
Re "What's in a name? Discord," Dec. 5 So it's all right to name a school in L.A. after the parents of City Councilman Tony Cardenas but not after any Republican president since William Howard Taft. Even Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon, both presidents from California, didn't make the cut. It is sad that our political animosity does not allow us to respect at least the office of the president. But hey, most people like jazz, so yay to Quincy Jones Elementary. Trudy Leete Rancho Palos Verdes ALSO: Letters: Indefensible spending Letters: The 'fiscal cliff' and Bush Letters: Voting-pattern data reveal all
OPINION
April 27, 2014
Re “School activist won't be ignored,” Column One, April 23 Kudos to Sally Smith. We need her in Long Beach, where the school district is determined to institutionalize income inequality by making most school activities accessible to wealthier kids only. When you implement a system in which those who pay the most get the most, then those who can't feel left out and are not as likely to succeed. My complaints to the school board and to the state superintendent went unanswered.
OPINION
April 12, 2013
Re "NRA's off-target plan," Opinion, April 9 You don't need to be a mathematician to know that the odds of a child surviving a school shooting are greater if the shooter is shot and killed than if he keeps shooting until his clip is empty. The moment someone enters a school with intent to kill, survival is the only issue. Instead, James Mulvaney writes about the difficulty in shooting a weapon during a crisis or what kind of weapon the staff member is carrying. This is about life and death, not succumbing to the will of the National Rifle Assn.
OPINION
August 16, 2012
Re "Back to the books," front-page photo, Aug. 15 Having Los Angeles Unified School District students return to the classroom weeks before the traditional Labor Day start is a disaster. My San Fernando Valley classroom was 92 degrees at 7:30 a.m. on Tuesday. Add 40-plus students, and the best my usually excellent air conditioner could do was the low 80s. A good learning environment involves more than teachers and students. The L.A. Board of Education should realize that June gloom is much more student-friendly than sweltering August.
OPINION
September 7, 2012
Re "A new lesson plan for truancy," Sept. 4 Since there are plenty of students who are truly interested in earning an education, and since our educational system lacks adequate funding, why force the unwilling to attend school? Truants who do not want to be in school take up needed materials, needed space and the energy of teachers. And they distract students who truly want to learn. The purpose of school is to educate, not to baby-sit. When people are fenced in, they want to break out. When attending school is seen as a privilege rather than a mandate, more young people will strive to be involved.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
It seems like every year around this time a report emerges of a high school athlete who died while practicing football in extreme heat. On Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a study reminding adults that football players, especially the big guys, are at much higher risk of heat-related illness than athletes in other sports. The report, published Thursday in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, found more than 9,000 heat-related illnesses occur among high school athletes each year, nationwide.
NEWS
July 6, 2012
A third of kids in U.S. public elementary schools can buy such beverages as sports drinks and full-fat milk at school, according to a study looking at wellness policies in schools. And that's an improvement, the researchers said. “Elementary schools across the country are improving the beverage landscape, showing that change is possible and it's already happening,” the lead author, Lindsey Turner, said in a statement. The work is part of an effort funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; it was published this month in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
Two students were in stable condition after they were shot in the arm at a Philadelphia high school gym, police said Friday, and a suspect was in custody. The incident began shortly before 3:30 p.m., Philadelphia Police Officer Tanya Little told the Los Angeles Times. A female student was shot in the left arm and a male student in the right arm, she said. The students, both 15, were taken to Albert Einstein Medical Center, she said. Delaware Valley Charter High School in the north part of the city was placed on lockdown, Little said, and officers cleared and dismissed students one by one.  As of 4:45 p.m., Little said, all students had been released and a suspect had been taken into custody.
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 A one-day archery competition that goes from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday will take place at the Woodley Park Archery Range in Van Nuys.  Approximately 90 high school and middle school competitors will be participating in the Olympic Archery in Schools conference championships. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | By Jason Song
El Camino Real Charter High School claimed the national 2014 Academic Decathlon title on Saturday, marking the seventh time the Woodland Hills school has won the honor. The school earned 52,601.1 points out of a possible 60,000 and beat out 52 other teams for the title. Granada Hills Charter High School finished second, about 200 points behind El Camino, a difference of about 10 questions. El Camino also narrowly edged Granada Hills in the California competition in March. The title is L.A. Unified's 15th national championship.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
A teenage boy suspected of fatally stabbing his high school classmate at a Connecticut high school just hours before the junior prom is under psychiatric evaluation, the teen's lawyer said Saturday. At the same time, friends of stabbing victim Maren Sanchez mourned her death, sharing memories of a girl they described as an outgoing teen who served as something of a “counselor” for many students and was known for heartfelt chats by her locker. The 16-year-old boy, whose name is being withheld because of his age, will not be in court during Monday's scheduled arraignment, his attorney, Edward J. Gavin, told the Los Angeles Times.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A 16-year-old boy refused to drop the knives he was using in a slashing attack at a Pennsylvania school and told a school official that he had “more people to kill,” according to a police affidavit released Friday. Alex Hribal was arraigned Friday on 21 counts of attempted homicide and 21 counts of aggravated assault in the April 9 attack at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville, Pa., about 20 miles from Pittsburgh. Hribal, who remains in custody, was originally charged with four counts of attempted homicide and 21 counts of aggravated assault.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
In the wake of a $10-million payout to a whistleblower, UCLA's School of Medicine is drawing more scrutiny over its financial ties to industry and the possibility that they compromised patient care. A new study in this month's Journal of the American Medical Assn. raised a red flag generally about university officials such as Eugene Washington, the dean of UCLA's medical school who also serves on the board of healthcare giant Johnson & Johnson. The world's biggest medical-products maker paid Washington more than $260,000 in cash and stock last year as a company director.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A 16-year-old girl was stabbed to death inside a Milford, Conn., high school just hours before the junior prom on Friday, officials said. Maren Sanchez died from her wounds at Bridgeport Hospital, Milford Police Chief Keith Mello told reporters. “We are obviously devastated by the loss of one of our students,” School Superintendent Elizabeth Feser said at the news conference from the scene. A 16-year-old boy has been taken into custody, officials said. His name is being withheld because of his age. Students at the school told reporters that the incident was caused by a dispute over a date for the junior prom, originally scheduled for Friday night but canceled because of the stabbing.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
Students gained less weight over three years if they lived in states that restricted the sale of unhealthy snacks at school than kids in states without those laws, a study has found. The study, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, also found that students in states with the restrictive laws who were overweight or obese in fifth grade were less likely to be that way by eighth grade than students in other states. The food and beverages sold in school stores, vending machines and elsewhere but outside the school meal program are often called “competitive foods” because they compete with the meals programs for student dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Five schools in Norway have cried "Uncle" in the face of the force that is Justin Bieber. "Believe" it or not, they're moving midterms up a week so as not to conflict with the pop star's scheduled shows in Oslo on April 16 and 17, the original testing dates.  "[L]ove this. 'Schools in Norway move midterms so students can attend Justin Bieber concert,'" Bieber tweeted Wednesday, forwarding a story link to his more than 37 million followers.  PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times The schools involved are in the Aspelund region, which is a good eight hours' drive from Oslo, according to the Wall Street Journal -- meaning students with tickets would have to skip school to make the shows.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
What kid (or even a parent or grandparent) wouldn't want to attend gladiator school, learn how to make gelato and craft their own Carnival mask? All these activities and more are part of an 11-day family adventure, designed for children ages 8 and older, offered by Perillo's Learning Journeys and Smithsonian Journeys. The tour begins with an exploration of Venice and a glass-making factory on the island of Murano. Then it's on to Modena and the new museum dedicated to Enzo Ferrari, and to Maranello, home of the Galleria Ferrari museum, Ferrari factory and test track.
HEALTH
April 25, 2014 | Valerie J. Nelson
Far older than most of the regulars at his weekly South Bay swing-dancing class, the World War II veteran invariably shuffles in, sidles up to his instructor and unwittingly gives voice to a scientific truth: "I'm here for my anti-aging therapy and happiness treatment. " Dancing has long been lauded as a great physical workout, yet research has increasingly shown that social dancing, such as swing, a lively, improvisational style that requires rapid-fire decision-making in concert with a partner, is also beneficial to both mind and spirit.
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