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School Administrators Housing

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1992 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The campus residence for the UCLA chancellor bespeaks the power, culture and resources of a great American university. The elegant Florentine-style house, nearly 11,000 square feet, is surrounded by seven acres of lush landscaping. Inside, walls are lined with valuable paintings, including a Picasso and an Utrillo. The wood-paneled library is stocked with books and sculptures, and there are beautiful Oriental rugs throughout. One thing, however, is missing: No chancellor lives there.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1993 | PHUONG LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Newport Beach couple's $1-million gift to UC Irvine for the construction of a new chancellor's residence has evoked mixed reaction from various groups on campus. UCI officials and some students Thursday lauded George and Arlene Cheng for the donation announced this week, which will enable the university to begin designs on the long-awaited $2.5-million University House project, which will include a chancellor's residence and entertainment center.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1993 | PHUONG LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Newport Beach couple's $1-million gift to UC Irvine for the construction of a new chancellor's residence has evoked mixed reaction from various groups on campus. UCI officials and some students Thursday lauded George and Arlene Cheng for the donation announced this week, which will enable the university to begin designs on the long-awaited $2.5-million University House project, which will include a chancellor's residence and entertainment center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1992 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The campus residence for the UCLA chancellor bespeaks the power, culture and resources of a great American university. The elegant Florentine-style house, nearly 11,000 square feet, is surrounded by seven acres of lush landscaping. Inside, walls are lined with valuable paintings, including a Picasso and an Utrillo. The wood-paneled library is stocked with books and sculptures, and there are beautiful Oriental rugs throughout. One thing, however, is missing: No chancellor lives there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1992
To capitalize on low real estate prices, the Cal State Northridge Foundation has bought a house in Northridge for the school's incoming president with plans to sell it in two or three years after building a presidential residence on campus, school officials announced this week. In exchange, after she becomes president on Sept. 5, Blenda J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To capitalize on low real estate prices, the Cal State Northridge Foundation has bought a house in Northridge for the school's incoming president, with plans to sell it in two or three years after building a presidential residence on campus, school officials announced Monday. In exchange, after she becomes president Sept. 5, Blenda J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The purchase of a $465,000 house as a temporary home for the incoming president of Cal State Northridge was ill-timed and should not have been done in secrecy, some CSUN faculty leaders said Tuesday. "It's extraordinarily unfortunate timing," said Jane Bayes, a past faculty president. "To have an expenditure of this sort at a time when students are being asked to pay 40% increases in fees, classes are being cut and faculty are being laid off seems a blatant affront."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Future California State University chancellors would live in a restored 1930s-era $1-million-plus house in the Belmont Heights area of Long Beach under a deal proposed Tuesday by university officials. The 4,670-square-foot, five-bedroom house at 275 Granada Ave. would replace the controversial Bel-Air residence that the university system recently sold for $3.6 million after it became a symbol of extravagance. The asking price for the Long Beach home is $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2006 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
Public school enrollment is dropping fast in some of the most notoriously crowded neighborhoods of Los Angeles as soaring rents and property values displace low-income, mostly immigrant families. "It's getting too expensive to live here. I hear that from parents all the time," clerk Mina Rocha said recently from her post at the front counter of Hobart Boulevard Elementary School in Pico-Union, in the crook of the 10 and 110 freeways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1992
To capitalize on low real estate prices, the Cal State Northridge Foundation has bought a house in Northridge for the school's incoming president with plans to sell it in two or three years after building a presidential residence on campus, school officials announced this week. In exchange, after she becomes president on Sept. 5, Blenda J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The purchase of a $465,000 house as a temporary home for the incoming president of Cal State Northridge was ill-timed and should not have been done in secrecy, some CSUN faculty leaders said Tuesday. "It's extraordinarily unfortunate timing," said Jane Bayes, a past faculty president. "To have an expenditure of this sort at a time when students are being asked to pay 40% increases in fees, classes are being cut and faculty are being laid off seems a blatant affront."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To capitalize on low real estate prices, the Cal State Northridge Foundation has bought a house in Northridge for the school's incoming president, with plans to sell it in two or three years after building a presidential residence on campus, school officials announced Monday. In exchange, after she becomes president Sept. 5, Blenda J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Future California State University chancellors would live in a restored 1930s-era $1-million-plus house in the Belmont Heights area of Long Beach under a deal proposed Tuesday by university officials. The 4,670-square-foot, five-bedroom house at 275 Granada Ave. would replace the controversial Bel-Air residence that the university system recently sold for $3.6 million after it became a symbol of extravagance. The asking price for the Long Beach home is $1.
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