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School Administrators Labor Relations

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1991 | JEAN MERL
The board Monday gave final approval to a two-year drive by principals to form their own union. Associated Administrators of Los Angeles, representing about 1,750 principals, assistant principals and middle managers at administrative offices, will begin contract negotiations with school officials this year. Previously, the administrators were represented by the superintendent's office, but they began seeking more autonomy--and power--after the May, 1989, teachers strike.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1998
A former principal at Inglewood High School has filed a lawsuit against the school district, the superintendent and three board members, alleging that the parties harassed, defamed and retaliated against him and violated his right to due process. Kenneth Crowe, 45, filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court earlier this month alleging that the district ignored state laws when it wrongfully removed him from his post at Inglewood High and made him a principal on special assignment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Faced with sharply rising teacher and administrator salaries, the Los Angeles Unified School District will be forced to make deep budget cuts--perhaps as much as $180 million--in the 1990-91 school year, district officials warned Monday. District chief financial officer Robert Booker told the Board of Education that the cuts will be needed because these expenditures have risen faster than the state's allowance for inflation increases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1991 | JEAN MERL
The board Monday gave final approval to a two-year drive by principals to form their own union. Associated Administrators of Los Angeles, representing about 1,750 principals, assistant principals and middle managers at administrative offices, will begin contract negotiations with school officials this year. Previously, the administrators were represented by the superintendent's office, but they began seeking more autonomy--and power--after the May, 1989, teachers strike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1998
A former principal at Inglewood High School has filed a lawsuit against the school district, the superintendent and three board members, alleging that the parties harassed, defamed and retaliated against him and violated his right to due process. Kenneth Crowe, 45, filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court earlier this month alleging that the district ignored state laws when it wrongfully removed him from his post at Inglewood High and made him a principal on special assignment.
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Ask any principal in the Los Angeles Unified School District what the past year was like, and the response is likely to be the same: It was a very rough year. Principals were reviled by the teachers' union, were asked by upper management to carry out unpopular actions and struggled through a nine-day teachers' strike that reduced most schools to baby-sitting operations. To make matters worse, the principals say, they were threatened with pay cuts.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1989 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Expecting teachers to feel sorry for principals or other school administrators when they lose their authoritarian roles would be like thinking that Russian peasants should have felt sorry for the Czar's regime when it was toppled. At least that's the colorful, if exaggerated, simile that feisty Los Angeles teachers' union President Wayne Johnson used to describe his lack of sympathy for school administrators who are being forced to share their decision-making powers with teachers and parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Faced with sharply rising teacher and administrator salaries, the Los Angeles Unified School District will be forced to make deep budget cuts--perhaps as much as $180 million--in the 1990-91 school year, district officials warned Monday. District chief financial officer Robert Booker told the Board of Education that the cuts will be needed because these expenditures have risen faster than the state's allowance for inflation increases.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1989 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Expecting teachers to feel sorry for principals or other school administrators when they lose their authoritarian roles would be like thinking that Russian peasants should have felt sorry for the Czar's regime when it was toppled. At least that's the colorful, if exaggerated, simile that feisty Los Angeles teachers' union President Wayne Johnson used to describe his lack of sympathy for school administrators who are being forced to share their decision-making powers with teachers and parents.
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Ask any principal in the Los Angeles Unified School District what the past year was like, and the response is likely to be the same: It was a very rough year. Principals were reviled by the teachers' union, were asked by upper management to carry out unpopular actions and struggled through a nine-day teachers' strike that reduced most schools to baby-sitting operations. To make matters worse, the principals say, they were threatened with pay cuts.
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