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NATIONAL
June 27, 2003 | From Associated Press
The state Supreme Court upheld the Seattle School District's use of race as a tiebreaker in high school admissions Thursday, sending the case back to a federal appeals court. The court ruled 8 to 1 that the district's "open choice" plan does not violate a voter-approved law that bans racial preferences in education, government hiring and contracting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
July 25, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Pop quiz: Two senior managers at different hair gel companies apply for a top management position at Aveda. Manager A's division increased sales by 15% in a growing company, while Manager B's group increased sales by 10% in a company with no growth. Who gets to attend the Aveda Christmas party next year (and what time does Train C arrive in Chicago)? Manager A, according to a study published Wednesday in PLOS One. Through a series of experiments, Samuel Swift and his colleagues determined that what matters most for getting into school or getting that promotion is your final performance record, regardless of how difficult it was to succeed.
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SCIENCE
July 25, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Pop quiz: Two senior managers at different hair gel companies apply for a top management position at Aveda. Manager A's division increased sales by 15% in a growing company, while Manager B's group increased sales by 10% in a company with no growth. Who gets to attend the Aveda Christmas party next year (and what time does Train C arrive in Chicago)? Manager A, according to a study published Wednesday in PLOS One. Through a series of experiments, Samuel Swift and his colleagues determined that what matters most for getting into school or getting that promotion is your final performance record, regardless of how difficult it was to succeed.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2012 | By Don Lee, Larry Gordon and Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
For years, transplant surgeons have struggled with a vexing problem: seriously ill patients desperate for new kidneys and healthy people who were willing to donate an organ but had the wrong tissue type. Somewhere in the country, they knew, the right combinations of donors and recipients existed, but matching them often proved impossible. With most other items, freely set prices enable markets to allocate goods efficiently. But in areas such as organ transplants, societies shun the idea of a cash transaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2005 | Zoe Strimpel, Special to The Times
Nowhere does the thought of school admissions raise more blood pressures or tingle more spines than in Manhattan: land of the rich, the competitive and -- as Nancy Lieberman's novel "Admissions" tells us loud and clear -- the corrupt. Nowhere does parental love and ambition collide more disturbingly, and nowhere do parents wear their kids' credentials like accessories more shamelessly.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2012 | By Don Lee, Larry Gordon and Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
For years, transplant surgeons have struggled with a vexing problem: seriously ill patients desperate for new kidneys and healthy people who were willing to donate an organ but had the wrong tissue type. Somewhere in the country, they knew, the right combinations of donors and recipients existed, but matching them often proved impossible. With most other items, freely set prices enable markets to allocate goods efficiently. But in areas such as organ transplants, societies shun the idea of a cash transaction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998
In response to Thomas Parham's column, "Can Admissions Be Colorblind If Society's Not?," (Orange County Voices, Feb. 1) there are two points: Certainly, if racism were still as potent and pervasive a force as Parham suggests, he would be able to come up with at least one example--out the tens of thousands of applications that UC Irvine receives each year--of an applicant who was denied admission because of his or her race. He doesn't. But much more important, Mr. Parham need only step outside of his office at UCI to understand his flawed perception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1997
Re "UC Regents Derail Vote on Ending VIP Admissions," May 16: Regarding preferential treatment for entrance to the University of California, I believe it's a complex issue that deserves a closer look. I am a graduate of UC Davis. I absolutely abhor the idea that you can buy your way into any educational entity. However, I don't believe most people donate to get their children into college. Donors usually give from the heart; most from their positive experiences in the UC system. I believe the quality of my education was enhanced through generous benefactors who enabled the universities to purchase state-of-the-art equipment and maintain top-notch facilities.
NEWS
September 10, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
Republican vice presidential candidate Dan Quayle was admitted to law school in 1970 through a special "equal opportunity" program designed to "reach out" to the poor, racial minorities and other students who might not be admitted through regular procedures, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reported Friday. A Quayle spokesman confirmed that the program was Quayle's route into law school, but defended its use.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Proficiency in organic chemistry may still be a necessary condition for getting into medical school. But starting in 2015, it will no longer be sufficient. In an effort to create a cadre of future physicians with improved bedside manners, the Assn. of American Medical Colleges has announced changes to the Medical College Admission Test ( MCATs ) that would plumb applicants' knowledge of psychology, sociology and biology, as well as their ethical and scientific reasoning skills.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court's conservative justices signaled Wednesday they were likely to strike down a University of Texas affirmative action policy, but did not make clear how far they might go in outlawing the use of race in admissions at colleges and universities. From his opening question, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said he was troubled by having students "check a box" to designate race or ethnicity and by allowing officials to decide who is admitted based on this factor.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Proficiency in organic chemistry may still be a necessary condition for getting into medical school. But starting in 2015, it will no longer be sufficient. In an effort to create a cadre of future physicians with improved bedside manners, the Assn. of American Medical Colleges has announced changes to the Medical College Admission Test ( MCATs ) that would plumb applicants' knowledge of psychology, sociology and biology, as well as their ethical and scientific reasoning skills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2010
Paul Gutman L.A. judge upheld race-based magnet admissions Paul Gutman, 78, a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who ruled that L.A. schools could continue using a race-based formula for magnet school admissions, died June 13. The cause was complications from spine surgery, according to his family. Appointed to the bench in 1993 by then-Gov. Pete Wilson, Gutman oversaw criminal cases before serving as a supervising judge of the Van Nuys-based Northwest District. In his 2007 ruling on magnet schools, Gutman wrote that the Los Angeles Unified School District had been ordered "quite clearly and beyond dispute" in 1981 "to employ race and ethnicity to ensure that the magnet schools would in fact be desegregated."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2009 | Larry Gordon
High school students, beware! College admissions and financial aid officers in California and elsewhere may be peeking over your digital shoulder at the personal information you post on your Facebook or MySpace page. And they might decide to toss out your application after reading what you wrote about that cool party last week or how you want to conduct your romantic life at college. According to a new report by the National Assn. for College Admission Counseling, about a quarter of U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2005 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
To Pastor Des Starr, the superintendent of a small religious school in Riverside County, the case is about protecting the freedom of his private institution to teach its students from a conservative Christian perspective. To the University of California, it is about defending the public university system's ability to set standards for admission to its campuses. And to many others, it represents a potentially significant new front in America's often bitter tug of war between church and state.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2005 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
In a ruling that gives public high schools the power to maintain racially balanced student bodies, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday upheld the Seattle School District's use of race as a factor in admissions. The court's 7-4 vote overturned a 2-1 decision a 9th Circuit panel made in 2002.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1997 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A federal judge has ruled that a UCLA-run elementary school may continue to use ethnicity as an admissions criteria because it is one of the nation's last remaining "laboratory" schools. In an opinion released Wednesday, U.S. District Judge David Kenyon found that the Corrine A. Seeds University Elementary School--known as UES--must assemble a student body that reflects California's racial and economic diversity to do credible research that benefits the state's schoolchildren.
NEWS
November 4, 1993
Wilson High School, Long Beach City College and UCLA have joined forces to create a program that will guarantee high school students admission to UCLA if they complete college preparatory classes at the high school and honors classes at the city college. Once the students receive their high school diplomas, they will be eligible for the city college's honors program. If a student completes that program with a grade-point average of at least 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2005 | Zoe Strimpel, Special to The Times
Nowhere does the thought of school admissions raise more blood pressures or tingle more spines than in Manhattan: land of the rich, the competitive and -- as Nancy Lieberman's novel "Admissions" tells us loud and clear -- the corrupt. Nowhere does parental love and ambition collide more disturbingly, and nowhere do parents wear their kids' credentials like accessories more shamelessly.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2003 | From Associated Press
The state Supreme Court upheld the Seattle School District's use of race as a tiebreaker in high school admissions Thursday, sending the case back to a federal appeals court. The court ruled 8 to 1 that the district's "open choice" plan does not violate a voter-approved law that bans racial preferences in education, government hiring and contracting.
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