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HEALTH
September 12, 2011 | By Michelle Andrews, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Treating skinned knees and stomachaches is part of the drill at any school nurse's office or school-based health center. But healthcare providers at these sites do much more than treat everyday aches and pains: They give checkups and vaccinations, make sure kids take their insulin shots and antidepressants on time, and teach them how to manage chronic conditions such as asthma. School-based health centers go beyond the services of a school nurse. They are clinics that provide primary care to students, and often mental health and dental care as well.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
As soon as the school day ended, the rush at the health clinic began. Two high school seniors asked for sports physicals. A group of teenagers lined up for free condoms. A girl told a counselor she needed a pregnancy test. The clinic, at Belmont High School near downtown Los Angeles, is part of a rapidly expanding network of school-based centers around the nation offering free or low-cost medical care to students and their families. In California, there are 183 school health centers, up from 121 in 2004.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
A special multi-agency task force decided Friday to move ahead on the possibility of a controversial school-based health center in San Diego as part of its broader plans to improve health and counseling services to students.
HEALTH
September 12, 2011 | By Michelle Andrews, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Treating skinned knees and stomachaches is part of the drill at any school nurse's office or school-based health center. But healthcare providers at these sites do much more than treat everyday aches and pains: They give checkups and vaccinations, make sure kids take their insulin shots and antidepressants on time, and teach them how to manage chronic conditions such as asthma. School-based health centers go beyond the services of a school nurse. They are clinics that provide primary care to students, and often mental health and dental care as well.
NEWS
May 16, 1993 | Compiled by Elston Carr / Times community correspondent
* Michael Godfrey Coordinator of School-Based Health Clinic Programs for the L.A. Unified District Norplant should be made available for students who have decided not to be abstinent as another contraceptive option. The district's school-based health clinics provide comprehensive health services to students who present a verified parent-consent form. Of the reproductive health services offered, Norplant is one contraceptive option available at San Fernando High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1997
The first of four school-based health clinics is scheduled to open next week to Compton students and their families. Funded through a state desegregation grant, the Bunche Middle School Health Center is expected to provide free medical and dental screenings, treatment for minor injuries and immunizations to families whose children are students at Centennial High School or any of its 12 feeder elementary and middle schools. The facility, at 12338 Mona Blvd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1989
Recently you ran an editorial entitled "The Real Issue Is Students' Health." In that editorial it was opined that a previous attempt at establishing a health clinic failed at a San Diego high school because of "protests from the Roman Catholic Church and from some narrow-minded parents who objected to the possibility that the clinic might dispense birth-control information or devices." I was a member of the Advisory Committee of the San Diego Unified School District, and future funding, the role of school districts in solving social problems, the primacy of curriculum and an upcoming election had a part in the decision to forgo further exploration of the concept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
Hoover High School administrators hope to tap a local health foundation for planning money as they begin the months-long process of designing a detailed plan for the school-based health and social service center that was approved in concept by the Board of Education on Tuesday. A Hoover committee of teachers, parents and community health leaders decided Thursday to ask the San Diego Community Health Care Alliance for financial assistance in setting up neighborhood planning committees, drawing up a menu of medical services, finding a private operator and obtaining operational funds from national foundations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1989
Bishop Leo T. Maher's irresponsible attempt to interfere with the installation of a school-based health clinic at Hoover High, which is supported by a large majority of the parents, is an outrageous abuse of his office. It would be one thing for him to criticize this action, which he certainly is entitled to do, but quite another, to agitate a vociferous minority to assist him in an attempt to abort the majority's expressed desire. Does Maher really want to convey the impression that the Catholic Church does not care one whit about the health of our young people?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1986
In response to Laura Semans' letter (Aug. 6), berating the San Diego School Board trustees for voting down the health clinics on campus, which would provide among other things family planning and dispensing of contraceptives (at the taxpayers' expense), I say three cheers! Secretary of Education William J. Bennett opposes these clinics and calls them an "abdication of moral authority." He also says that some births may be prevented but asks the question--what lessons does it teach, what attitudes does it encourage, what behaviors does it foster?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2002 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
A publicly funded health plan is donating $200,000 to temporarily reopen four school-based medical clinics in Los Angeles County -- three of them in the San Fernando Valley -- that closed recently because of budget cuts. The grant from L.A. Care Health Plan will allow the clinics at four Los Angeles Unified School District campuses to operate for the next four months, said John Wallace, a spokesman for the county Department of Health Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1997
The first of four school-based health clinics is scheduled to open next week to Compton students and their families. Funded through a state desegregation grant, the Bunche Middle School Health Center is expected to provide free medical and dental screenings, treatment for minor injuries and immunizations to families whose children are students at Centennial High School or any of its 12 feeder elementary and middle schools. The facility, at 12338 Mona Blvd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1995
I was extremely pleased to read the informative, balanced, and timely article, "A Medical Lifeline for Teens" (March 15). However, I am concerned that a portion of a statement that I made will be misunderstood by your readers, especially school nurses. The quote, that school-based health centers are not like the "typical nurses' offices with Band-Aids and hot water bottles," was part of a discussion of the public's misperception of the important role of school nurses and school-based health centers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1993
Dr. Joycelyn Elders' support of school-based health clinics is both farsighted and fiscally responsible. Students accessing clinic services receive the care they desperately need and return to their classrooms with minimum time away from their studies, enhancing their opportunities for educational advancement. Those who oppose Elders' appointment as surgeon general frequently argue that her support of school-based health clinic services increases the risk of teen sexuality and pregnancy.
NEWS
May 16, 1993 | Compiled by Elston Carr / Times community correspondent
* Michael Godfrey Coordinator of School-Based Health Clinic Programs for the L.A. Unified District Norplant should be made available for students who have decided not to be abstinent as another contraceptive option. The district's school-based health clinics provide comprehensive health services to students who present a verified parent-consent form. Of the reproductive health services offered, Norplant is one contraceptive option available at San Fernando High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1993 | Tracey Kaplan
San Fernando High School is believed to be one of only a handful of school-based health clinics in the nation to offer teen-age girls the contraceptive Norplant. What makes Norplant unique is that the system requires no effort on the recipient's part. Six matchstick-sized plastic capsules implanted under the skin of the upper arm release birth-control chemicals into the bloodstream for up to five years. The school gives parents the option of refusing reproductive services for their children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1993
Dr. Joycelyn Elders' support of school-based health clinics is both farsighted and fiscally responsible. Students accessing clinic services receive the care they desperately need and return to their classrooms with minimum time away from their studies, enhancing their opportunities for educational advancement. Those who oppose Elders' appointment as surgeon general frequently argue that her support of school-based health clinic services increases the risk of teen sexuality and pregnancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1993 | Tracey Kaplan
San Fernando High School is believed to be one of only a handful of school-based health clinics in the nation to offer teen-age girls the contraceptive Norplant. What makes Norplant unique is that the system requires no effort on the recipient's part. Six matchstick-sized plastic capsules implanted under the skin of the upper arm release birth-control chemicals into the bloodstream for up to five years. The school gives parents the option of refusing reproductive services for their children.
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