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School Bus Accidents Texas

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NEWS
May 29, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First, the tragedy. Then life's seamier side crept into this impoverished dot of a town on the Texas border. Enter the ambulance-chasers. This was the site of one of the worst school bus crashes in history. As a bright yellow bus, packed with about 80 students, was making its way to the nearby town of Mission last September, it was hit by a soft drink truck and plunged into a water-filled gravel pit. Twenty-one students were killed and dozens more were injured.
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NEWS
July 18, 1990 | Associated Press
The driver of the truck that hit a school bus in Texas last fall, sending it into a water-filled pit and killing 21 students, should have been able to stop despite faulty brakes, the National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday. The small number of emergency exits--only two--contributed to the deaths, the board said. NTSB Chairman James Kolstad said driver Ruben Perez "did not respond soon enough and he did not respond aggressively enough."
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NEWS
September 22, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
At least 19 students died and dozens more were injured when their fully loaded school bus plunged into a water-filled gravel pit Thursday morning after it was was hit by a truck carrying soft drinks. The bus, on its way to nearby Mission junior and senior high schools, had just picked up two more students when it was hit by the truck. Many of the students were standing in the aisles.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First, the tragedy. Then life's seamier side crept into this impoverished dot of a town on the Texas border. Enter the ambulance-chasers. This was the site of one of the worst school bus crashes in history. As a bright yellow bus, packed with about 80 students, was making its way to the nearby town of Mission last September, it was hit by a soft drink truck and plunged into a water-filled gravel pit. Twenty-one students were killed and dozens more were injured.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
Federal investigators found no evidence to support a truck driver's contention that his brakes failed before the vehicle rammed a school bus into a water-filled pit, killing 20 teen-agers, an official said Friday. "From a visual inspection, we can find nothing to indicate a failure in the braking system," said Lee Dickinson, a National Transportation Safety Board member. He said investigators would conduct other tests.
NEWS
September 25, 1989
Grief-stricken neighbors in Alton, Tex., watched as a soft-drink delivery truck and a school bus carrying federal investigators retraced the path of a collision that killed 20 students. National Transportation Safety Board member Lee Dickinson said the tests helped determine that the speed the bus was traveling Thursday on the two-lane road in southern Texas "was somewhere in the range of . . . 30 m.p.h." The speed limit on the road the bus was traveling is 55 m.p.h.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
The death toll in the state's worst school bus crash rose to 21 on Friday when a 15-year-old girl died from injuries suffered when the bus plunged into a water-filled pit on Sept. 21.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A company whose truck plowed into a school bus, knocking the vehicle into a water-filled pit near Alton, Tex., and killing 21 students, has agreed to pay $72 million to 16 of the victims' families. The settlements call for Valley Coca-Cola Bottling Co. to pay $4.5 million per death, lawyers for the families and the company said.
NEWS
September 24, 1989
As 4,000 people crowded a funeral for four of the victims in San Juan del Valle, Tex., the driver of a truck that collided with a school bus and knocked it into a water-filled pit refused to answer questions about the accident that killed 20 teen-agers, investigators said. On the advice of his attorneys, truck driver Ruben Perez, 25, chose not to talk to National Transportation Safety Board members about the Thursday accident in Alton, Tex., that injured at least 63 others.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | Associated Press
The driver of the truck that hit a school bus in Texas last fall, sending it into a water-filled pit and killing 21 students, should have been able to stop despite faulty brakes, the National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday. The small number of emergency exits--only two--contributed to the deaths, the board said. NTSB Chairman James Kolstad said driver Ruben Perez "did not respond soon enough and he did not respond aggressively enough."
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A company whose truck plowed into a school bus, knocking the vehicle into a water-filled pit near Alton, Tex., and killing 21 students, has agreed to pay $72 million to 16 of the victims' families. The settlements call for Valley Coca-Cola Bottling Co. to pay $4.5 million per death, lawyers for the families and the company said.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Texas couple will receive $3.3 million in the first out-of-court settlement reached in the deaths of 21 children in a school bus accident, a lawyer said in Houston. Kenneth Sparks, who represents Raul and Margarita Ortega of Alton, whose son died in the accident, said that a $1.5-million settlement agreed to by Valley Coca-Cola Bottling Co. would provide an interest-bearing series of monthly payments guaranteed for 35 years.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
The death toll in the state's worst school bus crash rose to 21 on Friday when a 15-year-old girl died from injuries suffered when the bus plunged into a water-filled pit on Sept. 21.
NEWS
September 25, 1989
Grief-stricken neighbors in Alton, Tex., watched as a soft-drink delivery truck and a school bus carrying federal investigators retraced the path of a collision that killed 20 students. National Transportation Safety Board member Lee Dickinson said the tests helped determine that the speed the bus was traveling Thursday on the two-lane road in southern Texas "was somewhere in the range of . . . 30 m.p.h." The speed limit on the road the bus was traveling is 55 m.p.h.
NEWS
September 24, 1989
As 4,000 people crowded a funeral for four of the victims in San Juan del Valle, Tex., the driver of a truck that collided with a school bus and knocked it into a water-filled pit refused to answer questions about the accident that killed 20 teen-agers, investigators said. On the advice of his attorneys, truck driver Ruben Perez, 25, chose not to talk to National Transportation Safety Board members about the Thursday accident in Alton, Tex., that injured at least 63 others.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
Federal investigators found no evidence to support a truck driver's contention that his brakes failed before the vehicle rammed a school bus into a water-filled pit, killing 20 teen-agers, an official said Friday. "From a visual inspection, we can find nothing to indicate a failure in the braking system," said Lee Dickinson, a National Transportation Safety Board member. He said investigators would conduct other tests.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Texas couple will receive $3.3 million in the first out-of-court settlement reached in the deaths of 21 children in a school bus accident, a lawyer said in Houston. Kenneth Sparks, who represents Raul and Margarita Ortega of Alton, whose son died in the accident, said that a $1.5-million settlement agreed to by Valley Coca-Cola Bottling Co. would provide an interest-bearing series of monthly payments guaranteed for 35 years.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
At least 19 students died and dozens more were injured when their fully loaded school bus plunged into a water-filled gravel pit Thursday morning after it was was hit by a truck carrying soft drinks. The bus, on its way to nearby Mission junior and senior high schools, had just picked up two more students when it was hit by the truck. Many of the students were standing in the aisles.
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