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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
School buses are likely to keep rolling for now, as the Legislature on Thursday restored $248 million for home-to-school transportation that was particularly crucial for small and rural school districts that need to take students across long distances. Gov. Jerry Brown, who eliminated the school busing money as of January after state revenues fell short of projections, has indicated that he supports the move. Educators throughout California had mobilized against the midyear elimination of all busing money, arguing that it would hit hardest remote districts such as Death Valley, which spends about $3,400 per student, compared to $26 or less for many suburban districts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
January 30, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro and David Zucchino
ATLANTA - As Georgia nursed a hangover from a freak winter storm, Gov. Nathan Deal took responsibility Thursday for poor preparation that led to massive gridlock in and around Atlanta, forcing drivers to sleep in their cars overnight or abandon the vehicles along slick, snow-covered roads. Most schools and offices across the area remained closed because of icy roads. Uniformed state and local police escorted motorists back to hundreds of abandoned vehicles along the interstate system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1989
The National Transportation's Safety Board's move to get serious about the unsafe school buses nationwide is welcomed but overdue (Part I, March 29). Last year I authored legislation which appropriated $60 million to replace school buses built before 1977. This initial legislation creates enough funding to replace a quarter of the entire California fleet with safe, fuel-efficient school buses, which is literally all that bus manufacturers can produce in the next three years. Monies for this project have and will continue to come from the Petroleum Violation Escrow Account, which California received as part of a settlement for oil company overcharges when federal price controls were in force.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Troopers and police in Atlanta on Thursday were escorting motorists back to hundreds of vehicles that were abandoned along the region's interstate system after a rare winter storm paralyzed the city in a freezing traffic gridlock that still has residents in recovery.   Across town, it was a case of “Dude, where's my car?” Officials warned that it was not yet completely safe to head back out onto the roads: subfreezing overnight temperatures dipped into the teens, leaving ice-covered roads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1987
Where and when can a hooker stand next to an admiral and be awarded a blue ribbon? Or a king of Siam be on the same terms with a bag lady? Only at an annual Halloween parade at your local elementary school. It is the one time your child takes a look at society and makes a choice as to whom to be for that one grand hour of pure fun. When parading is a thing of joy because you are not yourself, but a make-believe, and in competition for a blue ribbon among your peers who seem to know more what is current and "going on" than the adults who are standing enthralled and watching.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001
Motorists who have sat behind a belching yellow school bus, and parents with children riding in one, will cheer any regulation that helps replace the polluter with cleaner technology. The South Coast Air Quality Management District has a chance to impose such a rule Friday, finishing the job it began last year: cutting cancer-causing diesel emissions.
NEWS
October 17, 1995 | Associated Press
Two school buses carrying 100 middle school students collided Monday, and at least nine children and two drivers were taken to a hospital. An additional 33 people were treated at the scene, said Capt. C. L. Sealey of the Clayton County Fire Department. "Most everything was minor injuries," Sealey said. Both buses were from North Clayton Middle School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1990
Bus service in the Anaheim City Elementary School District was disrupted Wednesday when half of the driving staff called in sick, causing extended delays and in some cases forcing parents to drive their children to school. Dr. John L. Grogan, the district's assistant superintendent for personnel, said the drivers were apparently participating in a sickout related to a labor dispute between the district and the California School Employees Assn.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal highway safety officials are launching a major review of school bus safety and drafting guidelines that could lead to the installation of some seat belts in buses carrying children 4 and younger. The $1-million, two-year research program will include a search of all school bus crash data and agency crash testing and will look at all possible safety upgrades, including padding the sides and roofs of buses or adding padded arm rests.
OPINION
February 18, 2001
Re "Dangerous Exhaust Levels Found Inside School Buses," Feb. 12: The Natural Resources Defense Council's study on the impact of diesel school bus exhaust on children could do more harm than good if it results in the rejection of new, clean diesel technology. It's not news to report that older diesel buses cause harmful emissions. Thanks to enormous advances in engine technology and fuels, new clean diesel buses are essentially as clean, if not cleaner, than those running on alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas. The South Coast Clean Air Partnership--a coalition of school districts, transit agencies, the petroleum industry and other businesses--supports the use of both clean diesel and natural gas in bus fleets.
OPINION
January 17, 2014
Re “More L.A. schools to get computers,” Jan. 15 Maybe once the L.A. Unified iPad program is fully implemented and education is revolutionized, the district can replace school buses with rocket ships to revolutionize transportation. Frank Shapiro Chatsworth More letters to the editor ...  
NATIONAL
September 4, 2013 | By Matt Pearce and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- A 17-year-old student was fatally stabbed and three other students were injured Wednesday morning after a fight at a Houston-area high school, officials said. The stabbing was reported shortly after 7 a.m. CDT at Spring High School, about 25 miles north of downtown Houston, according to the Harris County Sheriff's Office. One student tweeted a photo of a blood splatter on the floor inside the school, which has more than 3,000 students and its own school district police.
OPINION
May 12, 2013 | By Gayle Greene
It came with us always. First the old upright, then the Baldwin, then the Steinway grand, no matter how often we moved, or how far - she'd no more have left it behind than she'd have left me. There was, in those days, much shouting and storming about, the screeching of tires as my father sped off in the night. When I was 10, they split up for good, and we landed near Palo Alto, where my mother was left, a single mother in the suburbs, in her 40s, in the 1950s, a decade that did not take kindly to divorcees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2013 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown will push this year to upend the way schools are funded in California, hoping to shift more money to poorer districts and end requirements that billions of dollars be spent on particular programs. Brown said he wants more of the state's dollars to benefit low-income and non-English-speaking students, who typically are more expensive to educate. "The reality is, in some places students don't enjoy the same opportunities that people have in other places," the governor said in an interview.
NEWS
December 18, 2012 | By Tina Susman
Richard and Margarita Rosiak's two little girls woke up Tuesday with an unusual request for how the family from Downey, Calif., should spend their last day of vacation in New York City: They wanted to go to Newtown, Conn., to pay tribute to the 20 children killed in last week's elementary school rampage. "They got up really really early and said, 'Let's go up there and write something and say a prayer,'" said Richard Rosiak, an attorney, as he stood outside St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church in central Newtown, about a 90-minute drive from the family's hotel in midtown Manhattan.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2012 | By Tina Susman and Michael Muskal
NEWTOWN, Conn. -- Amid increased security, schools reopened here on Tuesday as this town searched for a road back to normality after last week's massacre at a local elementary school. Funerals for the 20 first-graders and six adults killed Friday morning at Sandy Hook Elementary School will continue throughout the week. Two children were buried on Monday amid the cold and rain and two more funerals are scheduled for Tuesday. Sandy Hook remained closed, however, and will likely be shuttered for months as authorities continue their investigation into the shooting spree by Adam Lanza, 20, who killed himself after invading the school, opening fire on students and staff and then turning a gun on himself.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Two school buses crashed at a bus stop in Monroe, injuring 22 children and a bus driver, authorities said. The elementary-age children and the driver were treated for cuts and bruises, but all were released from hospitals within a few hours, school officials said. The cause of the crash was under investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
John Greenwood, a political moderate who headed the Los Angeles Board of Education in the mid-1980s and later served as president of the Southern California branch of the nonprofit Coro organization, has died. He was 67. Greenwood died of a heart attack Oct. 11 in San Pedro, where he and his family had lived for many years, said his sister-in-law Peg Greenwood. First elected to the school board in 1979, Greenwood saw his eight-year tenure begin at a time of deep contention among trustees and in the sprawling district over court-ordered mandatory school busing for integration, which had been launched the previous year.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Matthew Teague
Gulf Coast officials attempted to calm the region's residents on Monday, particularly in New Orleans, stressing that they're prepared for the arrival of Tropical Storm Isaac. The storm, expected to become a Category 1 or 2  hurricane, is on track to hit that city on or near the seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina's arrival. "That brings a high level of anxiety," New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said at a Monday news conference, adding that the storm has been "bringing back emotions I never thought I'd feel,” reminding him and others of “the worst day in our immediate history.” “That's why we want to give a lot of information and make people as comfortable as possible," Landrieu said, reeling off a list of storms and other disasters that have rocked the Crescent City in recent years: Katrina, Ike, Gustav, the BP oil spill.
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