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NEWS
March 11, 1994 | CARL INGRAM and JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson and legislative leaders agreed Thursday on an expanded $2-billion bond issue to pay for Northridge earthquake recovery and for seismic safety improvements on highway bridges, with the work weighted heavily toward Northern California. The agreement, scheduled for a vote by both houses of the Legislature on Monday, also includes a separate $1-billion public school construction bond issue, which will nearly triple the amount of bonds initially proposed by Wilson.
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NEWS
March 11, 1994 | CARL INGRAM and JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson and legislative leaders agreed Thursday on an expanded $2-billion bond issue to pay for Northridge earthquake recovery and for seismic safety improvements on highway bridges, with the work weighted heavily toward Northern California. The agreement, scheduled for a vote by both houses of the Legislature on Monday, also includes a separate $1-billion public school construction bond issue, which will nearly triple the amount of bonds initially proposed by Wilson.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1986
In order to fully understand the importance of Proposition 53, the 1986 School Facility Bond, it is appropriate to provide a brief history of school construction in California. Since 1978, school construction and reconstruction has become a problem of alarming dimensions. The state established a program intended to respond in the statewide school facility needs called the Leroy F. Greene State School Building Lease-Purchase Program, but the funding to date has not been adequate and the backlog of funding needs have been rising.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, the state safety inspector declared this town's 86-year-old high school, a crumbling brick structure squatting on a hill over downtown, "no longer safe to occupy." Fix it fast or abandon it, the inspector said. School officials knew its shortcomings only too well. The fire escape clings to the wall by a couple of loose bolts. Exposed pipes run along the ceiling. The girls locker room sits in a narrow basement space next to the old furnace, and if it ever blows, there's no escape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the watchdog panel overseeing the spending of Proposition BB funds urged local officials Monday to cut through a normally cumbersome bureaucracy that otherwise would force Los Angeles schools to wait a year or more for air conditioning.
OPINION
February 23, 2003 | Victor M. Rodriguez
While some national papers picked up the story of a political brawl in South Gate, very few in the national media highlighted the most important political shift taking place in the participation of Latinos in local politics. In Santa Ana, with the most Latinos of any U.S. city its size, the rising grass-roots participation of Latinos was dealt a setback in fashioning public policy on education. Whether this is a trend or a fleeting event remains to be seen.
NEWS
December 15, 1985 | JENNIFER KERR, Associated Press
If the state of California were a student in one of its 7,400 public schools, it might get this report card for 1985, more than a year after passage of a landmark reform law: "A" for improvements in money for schools, tougher courses, longer days and years, and better pay for beginning teachers. "Excellent" for the new attitude and spirit of the 1,029 school districts teaching 4.2 million children.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson will ask the Legislature this week to approve a massive school construction proposal that would raise $16 billion over the next six years to accommodate soaring enrollment, senior administration officials said Sunday. His idea seeks to resolve a vexing problem for both rich and poor school districts--how to build new classrooms with just a patchwork of often uncertain funding sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1999 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deborah Boyd's classroom at Abraham Lincoln School in Simi Valley looks like a typical second-grade room. Construction-paper owls hang from the ceiling, and children's books line the shelves. But Boyd's classroom isn't a permanent building. It is one of hundreds of "portables" that have sprouted up on Ventura County campuses in recent years. Portables have drawn mixed reviews. Teachers praise them for being new, clean and spacious, and principals say they are inexpensive and quick to install.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1999 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget ivy-covered buildings. For Los Angeles' largest group of college students--including most of its poor and minority pupils--graffiti-covered restrooms, weed-choked flower beds and dingy portable classrooms are the symbols of a higher education. Meanwhile, in neighboring districts such as Glendale's and Pasadena's, community college campuses are clean and well lighted, full of new and remodeled buildings, painted in matching colors. Why such disparities?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
James Hubbell, nearly 71 years old and still inclined to daydreams of dragonfly wings, steers his white Dodge van with eerie calm through hellish binational traffic. Behind him, he keeps at hand a tape measure, a bag of mortar, a builder's level, several trowels, a tube of sun block. Ahead, as usual, lies a building site. "I don't really know why I do it, except it's an excuse to do something," Hubbell has just been saying. "I just like to build."
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