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School Construction Contracts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1993 | TOMMY LI
School board members have for the second time authorized a bidding process to find a contractor for a classroom expansion project that would relieve crowding at Glendale High School. The initial bids were scrapped in April after confusion arose among contractors over design requirements. The new bid process, approved by a 4-1 vote Tuesday night, is expected to begin Nov. 1, according to a report by Stephen R. Hodgson, assistant superintendent of business services.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1993 | TOMMY LI
School board members have for the second time authorized a bidding process to find a contractor for a classroom expansion project that would relieve crowding at Glendale High School. The initial bids were scrapped in April after confusion arose among contractors over design requirements. The new bid process, approved by a 4-1 vote Tuesday night, is expected to begin Nov. 1, according to a report by Stephen R. Hodgson, assistant superintendent of business services.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2011 | By Gale Holland and Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
A Texas architect who admitted paying bribes to influence the awarding of school construction contracts in that state later helped manage major construction programs at community colleges in Southern California. Most recently, Louis M. Cruz was a project manager for a $616-million building campaign at Long Beach City College. Previously, he held similar responsibilities at the Los Angeles Community College District, managing $190 million worth of construction. Cruz was a central figure in a corruption scandal in San Antonio, Texas.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Prosperity has returned at last to Southern California's economy. Now if only wisdom were to follow, we could be assured the region will fulfill its great potential in the years ahead. But the ballot initiatives for Tuesday's statewide primary election are characterized by argument and division, not wisdom. And that promises to reinforce a worrisome trend of bitter differences that constantly threatens progress in Southern California's economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2008 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Few of the primary contests that voters will decide Tuesday are as rancorous as the one between two Republicans who once served together in the Legislature. The fight between John Benoit and Russ Bogh, who once sat a few feet apart in the Assembly and rarely differed on issues, has grown so acrimonious that they are practically accusing one another of criminal acts.
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