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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999
Despite some community outcry, school officials said they plan to recommend four sites for new schools in the northeast San Fernando Valley that could include taking at least 85 homes and apartments as well as 30 businesses. At a school board committee meeting today at district headquarters in Los Angeles, officials will recommend that the district conduct feasibility studies on the sites to relieve overcrowding in the East Valley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles City Controller Rick Tuttle has appointed civil rights attorney Constance L. Rice to the citizens' committee that oversees the $2.4-billion Los Angeles school repair and construction bond. Rice will replace David Abel, publisher of a regional planning newsletter, on the 11-member committee, created by the 1997 Proposition BB bond measure. Rice has long been involved in litigation over racial discrimination and school equity.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles City Controller Rick Tuttle has appointed civil rights attorney Constance L. Rice to the citizens' committee that oversees the $2.4-billion Los Angeles school repair and construction bond. Rice will replace David Abel, publisher of a regional planning newsletter, on the 11-member committee, created by the 1997 Proposition BB bond measure. Rice has long been involved in litigation over racial discrimination and school equity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999
Despite some community outcry, school officials said they plan to recommend four sites for new schools in the northeast San Fernando Valley that could include taking at least 85 homes and apartments as well as 30 businesses. At a school board committee meeting today at district headquarters in Los Angeles, officials will recommend that the district conduct feasibility studies on the sites to relieve overcrowding in the East Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Los Angeles Board of Education is set to vote on the controversial Belmont Learning Center project this afternoon, unless the teachers union is successful this morning in a last-minute bid to get a judge to block the action. The proposed downtown high school has run into a firestorm of criticism over the past week, ever since the board disclosed plans to help build it with more than $40 million from the recently passed $2.4-billion local school bond measure, Proposition BB.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1997 | AMY PYLE and PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Saying further delays would be "unconscionable," Los Angeles school board President Jeff Horton led the drive Monday to approve the Belmont Learning Center, but the board left in limbo a decision about how to pay for the $87-million high school. The vote to contract with Kajima International to build the campus west of downtown went forward after two unions suing the district over the plan failed to gain a temporary restraining order earlier in the day that would have blocked a vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of a project that would be Los Angeles' most expensive public high school say that funding the school from a recently approved bond measure would be a breach of the public's faith if the project is not reviewed. "The whole Temple-Beaudry project needs to go to the oversight committee," United Teachers-Los Angeles President Day Higuchi told the school board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite some community outcry, Los Angeles school officials said they plan to recommend four sites for new schools in the northeast San Fernando Valley that could include taking at least 85 homes and apartments as well as 30 businesses. At a school board committee meeting today, Los Angeles Unified officials will recommend that the district conduct feasibility studies on the sites for two elementary schools and two high schools needed to relieve overcrowding in the East Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
With a new lawsuit pending and concerns snowballing inside and outside the school district, the Los Angeles Board of Education on Monday delayed a commitment to spend up to $98 million on a replacement for Belmont High School. The postponement brought shouts of protest from neighbors of the project, who are counting on the 3,600-student Belmont Learning Center, planned for the intersection of Temple Street and Beaudry Avenue, to keep their children off school buses.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1999 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After decades in which business school classrooms were almost interchangeable, university leaders throughout the United States are scrambling to erect spectacular, high-tech buildings they say are necessary to attract top students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite some community outcry, Los Angeles school officials said they plan to recommend four sites for new schools in the northeast San Fernando Valley that could include taking at least 85 homes and apartments as well as 30 businesses. At a school board committee meeting today, Los Angeles Unified officials will recommend that the district conduct feasibility studies on the sites for two elementary schools and two high schools needed to relieve overcrowding in the East Valley.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1999 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After decades in which business school classrooms were almost interchangeable, university leaders throughout the United States are scrambling to erect spectacular, high-tech buildings they say are necessary to attract top students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1997 | AMY PYLE and PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Saying further delays would be "unconscionable," Los Angeles school board President Jeff Horton led the drive Monday to approve the Belmont Learning Center, but the board left in limbo a decision about how to pay for the $87-million high school. The vote to contract with Kajima International to build the campus west of downtown went forward after two unions suing the district over the plan failed to gain a temporary restraining order earlier in the day that would have blocked a vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Los Angeles Board of Education is set to vote on the controversial Belmont Learning Center project this afternoon, unless the teachers union is successful this morning in a last-minute bid to get a judge to block the action. The proposed downtown high school has run into a firestorm of criticism over the past week, ever since the board disclosed plans to help build it with more than $40 million from the recently passed $2.4-billion local school bond measure, Proposition BB.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of a project that would be Los Angeles' most expensive public high school say that funding the school from a recently approved bond measure would be a breach of the public's faith if the project is not reviewed. "The whole Temple-Beaudry project needs to go to the oversight committee," United Teachers-Los Angeles President Day Higuchi told the school board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
With a new lawsuit pending and concerns snowballing inside and outside the school district, the Los Angeles Board of Education on Monday delayed a commitment to spend up to $98 million on a replacement for Belmont High School. The postponement brought shouts of protest from neighbors of the project, who are counting on the 3,600-student Belmont Learning Center, planned for the intersection of Temple Street and Beaudry Avenue, to keep their children off school buses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1988
The last boom years for California public education were in the 1950s and 1960s, when enrollment climbed steeply and school construction climbed right along with it throughout the state. Nearly two decades later, many of the state's college laboratories are out of date. University campuses as well as public schools are again squeezed for space as a result of another boom in which record numbers of students are once again entering universities and classrooms from kindergarten through high school.
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