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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Pots were boiling, pastries were baking and bodies were moving Wednesday as students at Aliso Niguel High School prepared a special luncheon to announce the start of an internship program to teach students the restaurant business. Students spend 15 hours a week working at local restaurants as part of their Culinary Arts Department curriculum. They also may receive community college credit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
A plan to suspend California's standardized testing for certain grades while new computerized exams are developed could save $15 million, the state's top education official said. State Supt. of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson recommended to the state Board of Education last week that the savings be used instead to develop higher-quality tests linked to new uniform but voluntary academic standards. They have been adopted by 45 states, including California, which plans to roll them out in the 2014-15 school year.
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NEWS
November 9, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After decades in which many of the best science and math classes were offered in elite private and suburban schools and catered only to highly motivated children with extraordinary IQs, a new trend is emerging. In a growing number of schools, teachers are experimenting with new approaches and materials, turning average and even below-average students into budding young scientists and mathematicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
California community colleges have shed more than 300,000 students since 2009 because the students cannot get into classes, and the toll is likely to grow unless the state reverses course and pumps more money into higher education. That bleak assessment was delivered last week by California Community Colleges Chancellor Jack Scott in a State of Community Colleges address at Pasadena City College. Scott served as president of the college from 1987 to 1995, before being elected to the state Legislature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1990 | JOHN IRWIN, JOHN IRWIN, a sociology professor at San Francisco State University, is the author of three books on the American prison system. Irwin was convicted on an armed robbery charge in 1952 and was paroled in 1957. The Times asked his views on prisoner rehabilitation. and
After years of minor convictions for minor offenses, some jail time and finally a prison sentence, I decided it was time to change. I began to prepare myself for release from prison by polishing up on high school courses and taking a few college correspondence courses. When I was released, I enrolled at San Francisco State. In those years (1950s) there was a very developed rhetoric about rehabilitation and there was some attempt to actualize that rhetoric.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the United States is launching a war on scientific illiteracy, the Soviet Union is also trying to reform science and math education--but in almost exactly the opposite direction. At a meeting Friday at Cal State Long Beach, a leader of the Soviet reform movement told U.S. educators that the Soviet system fails to educate the best and brightest science and math students. Unlike the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1991 | ANITA M. CAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 14, Jackie Cervantes can already rattle off a list of friends who have dropped out of school and are struggling to survive on meager wages--that is, if they have a job at all. But Cervantes, an eighth-grader at Sierra Intermediate School, says that's not the route for her, certainly not since taking a class at school that shows students how hard it is to find a well-paying job without a high school diploma. "Dropping out is dumb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1995 | ENRIQUE LAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At South Gate High, teen-agers are lining up to have babies. Students in a teen-age pregnancy prevention program--the only one of its kind in Los Angeles County--spend several days lugging around frighteningly lifelike baby dolls that wail at unpredictable intervals. The $220, computer-controlled "baby" with a recording of a newborn's cries cannot be quieted unless properly cuddled and "fed" by inserting a key into its monitoring device.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1987
In an attempt to force the Los Angeles Unified School District to sharply expand its offering of English classes for foreign-born residents, the Western Center on Law and Poverty filed a suit Wednesday accusing the district of failing to comply with state law by keeping an estimated 21,000 people on waiting lists. The Los Angeles Superior Court lawsuit asks the court to issue an injunction requiring the district to shift more money to adult school courses in English as a second language (ESL).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2001 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks ago, Nancy Goldberg, an English teacher at Culver City High School, received a letter from the College Board, which administers standardized tests. Goldberg and a colleague, Curt Mortenson, had been so good at preparing students for the college-level Advanced Placement tests that the board wanted her assistance. Would she be willing to train teachers around the country to do the same?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2011 | By Megan O'Neil, Los Angeles Times
Glendale Unified officials this week did an about-face, announcing they would enroll a complete class of German-language kindergarten students at Franklin Elementary School in fall 2012 rather than initiating a drawdown of the program as previously planned. Speaking to a standing-room-only crowd of parents at the school Tuesday night, Glendale Unified Supt. Dick Sheehan said the district would also create a task force that includes "a selective group of parents ... to show that the German program is a viable option.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2008 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Prompted by the fatal classroom shooting of an Oxnard student that prosecutors allege was a hate crime, a state legislator Monday announced plans to introduce a bill to expand diversity education in California schools. Assemblyman Mike Eng (D-Monterey Park), chairman of the Assembly Select Committee on Hate Crimes, said his bill would supplement existing criminal statutes regarding crimes against victims based on their race, religion, ethnicity or sexual orientation.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A plan to require public schools to teach classes with the Bible as a textbook was changed by a Texas legislative panel to make such classes optional instead. The House Public Education Committee approved the modified bill, drawing praise from critics who feared mandatory Bible courses would be more religious than academic.
WORLD
March 22, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The spiritual leader of the world's Anglicans does not believe that creationism should be taught in schools. "I don't think it should, actually. No, no," said Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, reflecting on the education debate over religion and science that has divided the United States.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2005 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
The hard-fought school election was over, and there was hope that the scars from a nationally watched battle between evolution and intelligent design in public schools would begin to heal at Monday's meeting of the Dover school board. But bitterness persisted over last week's results, in which eight candidates opposed to the teaching of intelligent design in this rural community narrowly defeated eight incumbents, who had included it as part of the science curriculum.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2005 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
In this rural swath of northern Kansas, where the grass rolls thick and green to the horizon, a white cross dominates the landscape. Kathy Martin, a member of the state board of education, and her family built it on their farm this spring, gathering weathered chunks of limestone from the horse pasture and laying them on a hillside. The cross is a proud expression of Martin's faith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1993 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly a year after Woodland Hills teen-ager Adam Bischoff drowned in the storm-swollen Los Angeles River, city and county officials on Wednesday unveiled a program for Los Angeles County schools aimed at preventing children from dying in flood-control channels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Monroe High School girls tried not to giggle or snap their gum, and the boys tried not to bug the girls, slouch or botch a marching order. "Above all else," teacher Jeff Marciano told the students marching in the auditorium, "you have to always remember to take pride in the little things."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2005 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't until he went blind that Michael Richard found his photographic vision. That's how the Studio City photographer describes what happened after he lost virtually all his sight three years ago. Surgery to remove a tumor behind one of his eyes left him able to see only gauzy, indistinct shapes. Richard, 57, felt that his days as a scenic and documentary photographer were over. "I figured photography was out of the picture. I couldn't see to focus. So how could I shoot photos?" he reasoned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2004 | Veronica Torrejon, Times Staff Writer
With eyes fixed straight ahead and sweat glistening on his forehead, 11-year-old Eric Vasquez moves his feet frantically during his gym class to keep pace with computerized music and flashing neon arrows displayed on the screen of an arcade dance game. "Whoa," he says, wiping the sweat with his forearm.
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