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School Daze

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1988
Sorry, Michael, but you missed the point (" 'School Daze' Crammed With Cheeky Satire," by Michael Wilmington, Feb. 13). "School Daze" was a letter to black Americans. It was not a satire. Except for the dance numbers, it was an honest look at a black college campus showing some of the attitudes and conflicts of young black Americans. The entire movie was a setup for the dream sequence where Dap runs out to the school bell and insists that everybody wake up, notice their condition and do something about it. Lee's approach is straight and simple.
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OPINION
June 28, 2006
TODAY, THE STATE SENATE EDUCATION Committee takes up a bill intended to simplify the management, and therefore improve the accountability, of the Los Angeles Unified School District. Instead, the bill complicates the district's governance and therefore confuses its lines of responsibility. It's more properly described as an invitation to legislative interference than as a plan to reform the city's schools.
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MAGAZINE
April 14, 1996 | Amy Wallace
At nearly any other school, it might have been a prop crisis. WHEN? Students at the Crossroads School for Arts and Sciences in Santa Monica were staging the musical "Godspell," the modernized biblical tale in which the Romans are baton-carrying cops, and they needed a police car for the final act. Oh, sure, they could have fashioned something out of papier-ma^che. But thanks to TV producer Steven Bochco, whose son was attending the exclusive private school, they got the real thing instead.
TRAVEL
September 11, 2005 | Marcy Barack, Special to The Times
EXHAUSTED parents, collapsed on sofas in college admissions offices, tell one another this urban legend while waiting for the next campus tour. It's about one family who took their teenager to visit a dozen schools in Pennsylvania in three days. They started out west in Pittsburgh and worked their way east to Philadelphia, Allegheny to Swarthmore, Pitt to Penn. By the time they were done, they were beat.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1988
Spike Lee's "School Daze" (opening Friday at selected theaters) apparently began as a simple little script about pledges at an all-black Atlanta college fraternity during homecoming weekend. But somewhere along the line, after the success of his "She's Gotta Have It," Lee began to load--even overload--his story. It flares off in every direction, exploding in Roman-candle bursts of cheeky satire.
SPORTS
May 27, 2000 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ
Keeping pace with the weather service, here are some highs and lows in sports this school year . . . High . . . The Ventura women's basketball team rolls to the state championship, its third in five seasons. Ventura finishes 38-0 and becomes the first school to win two women's titles with perfect records. Coach Ned Mircetic reaches the 300-victory plateau. He is 304-39 in 10 seasons with the Pirates. Low . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Responding to criticism that his latest film, "School Daze," shows black college students in an unflattering light, director Spike Lee said Tuesday night that he "knew it would make people squirm," but that the film drew faithfully upon his own student experiences at Atlanta's Morehouse College. "Nothing in this film is made up," Lee told a Howard University audience in Washington during a televised panel discussion that was transmitted by satellite to 200 black colleges across the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1988 | CONNIE JOHNSON
*** VARIOUS ARTISTS. "School Daze" sound track. EMI-Manhattan. Like the movie, this album covers a lot of ground within the black idiom, and some of its ideas work just as audaciously. In the spirit of healthy nepotism, "School Daze" producer Spike Lee has his father, jazz musician/composer Bill Lee, write and produce several tracks. One of the best is "Be One," a sultry ballad sung by Phyllis Hyman. It's the type of music that the Philadelphia-born chanteuse should record more often.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2005 | Steve Harvey
Talk about ordering off the menu. In an Anaheim Hills restaurant, a 40ish husband informed waiter Nick Gannon that he and his wife were running late and wanted to see a movie playing elsewhere in the shopping center. "Can you go get us the movie times and we'll be ready to order by the time you come back," the husband said. Gannon politely told him that he could not because he was also waiting on other tables. A better reply would have been: I'll be your server, not your servant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2004 | Steve Harvey, Steve Harvey can be reached at (800)LATimes, Ext. 77083, by fax at (213)237-4712, by mail at Metro, L.A. Times, 202 W. 1st St., L.A. 90012, and by e-mail at steve.harvey@latimes.com.
I mentioned that when a college opened in Camarillo, it was named Cal State University Channel Islands, though, of course, Camarillo is on the mainland. Rumor has it that school officials were afraid that the initials of a Cal State University Camarillo -- CSUC -- would draw unintended laughs. So now the school is CSUCI. The result? Marvin Petal notes that it's known to locals as Cal Sushi. School daze (cont.
SPORTS
May 27, 2000 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ
Keeping pace with the weather service, here are some highs and lows in sports this school year . . . High . . . The Ventura women's basketball team rolls to the state championship, its third in five seasons. Ventura finishes 38-0 and becomes the first school to win two women's titles with perfect records. Coach Ned Mircetic reaches the 300-victory plateau. He is 304-39 in 10 seasons with the Pirates. Low . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1999 | STANLEY OROPESA, Stanley Oropesa lives in Pasadena
There is a real threat to education in California, and it is has nothing to do with the largely symbolic battle over who is superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District. The real danger is hiding behind the catchy title of "calendar reform," another innovation that will impact our students' ability to learn and compete with others lucky enough to be educated elsewhere. Calendar reform shortens the amount of time students spend in the classroom each year. For the past few years, L.A.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1999 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID
When I was preparing to go off to college, my biggest purchasing decision was to pick out the appropriate Smith Corona electric typewriter. As long as I used a black ribbon, I didn't have to worry about any compatibility issues. Today, students and their parents have a bit more to think about. Should they get a Macintosh or a Windows PC or rely on a public machine at the campus computer lab?
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