Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSchool District Finances
IN THE NEWS

School District Finances

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1996
An audit of the Centinela Valley Union High School District in the Hawthorne area shows a number of financial and personnel irregularities that have resulted in one administrator being fired and another quitting. The district, with nearly 6,000 students, includes Leuzinger High School and Hawthorne High School. The $42,000 audit, commissioned in April 1995 by district Supt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 3, 2005 | From Newsday
Top school officials and their friends and families siphoned off more than $11 million of Roslyn, N.Y., district money in an elaborate scheme involving far more people and far more extravagant spending than had been suspected, a state report has found.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
March 3, 2005 | From Newsday
Top school officials and their friends and families siphoned off more than $11 million of Roslyn, N.Y., district money in an elaborate scheme involving far more people and far more extravagant spending than had been suspected, a state report has found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A San Francisco federal grand jury is probing the financially troubled West Fresno School District. The grand jury subpoenaed documents earlier this month about funds that were supposed to be spent to upgrade school technology, the Fresno Bee reported. The district received $6.5 million over three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2000 | STEVEN B. FRATES, Steven B. Frates is a fellow at the Rose Institute of State and Local Government at Claremont McKenna College. He lives in Newport Beach
The passage of Proposition 39 sets into motion an interesting series of changes in the political calculus of state and local government finance in California. Proposition 39, which reduces the threshold necessary to pass local school bond issues from two-thirds to 55% of the votes cast, almost certainly will lead to more bonded debt and higher taxes to service that debt. This may make it more difficult for cities, counties and special districts to float bonds or raise taxes.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The embezzlement of at least $3 million from the Newport-Mesa Unified School District has triggered fear and alarm among school district officials across California who wonder: "Can it happen here?" At a recent California School Boards Assn.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In many of California's public schools, students are packed 35 or 40 to a room. Teachers face layoffs or pay cuts. Music and art instruction has been curtailed. Paint peels from the buildings. Parents donate everything from photocopy paper to paper towels. And business leaders complain that many graduates cannot read or write well enough to do an entry-level job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Orange Unified School District trustees agreed to start an English immersion program for preschoolers, to hire a public relations officer and to tee off on a girls' golf program before adopting an annual budget of $145 million last week. The budget for the 1998-99 fiscal year is down by several million dollars from last year, largely because finance officials did not have to include the $3 million the district spent to renovate McPherson magnet school, which opened in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1996 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As expected, a state education panel has rejected the Laguna Beach Unified School District's deficit-ridden budget, but it supported the district's actions to balance the spending plan and avoid future fiscal problems. "They essentially endorsed the plan that we had already working, and they confirmed the numbers we were working with," acting Supt. Jackson E. Parham said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In 1993, a management audit of the Los Angeles Unified School District suggested that broad savings could be realized by paring back bureaucracy and interweaving computer systems. But making those very changes, a process that began even before the audit, sent district costs soaring in one area--overtime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The state superintendent of public instruction has ordered an investigation of an East Palo Alto school district's finances. The superintendent of the Ravenswood City School District, Charlie Mae Knight, is already facing 19 felony conflict-of-interest charges. Prosecutors say Knight stood to benefit when the school district gave loans to employees who rented housing from her or who owed her money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2000 | STEVEN B. FRATES, Steven B. Frates is a fellow at the Rose Institute of State and Local Government at Claremont McKenna College. He lives in Newport Beach
The passage of Proposition 39 sets into motion an interesting series of changes in the political calculus of state and local government finance in California. Proposition 39, which reduces the threshold necessary to pass local school bond issues from two-thirds to 55% of the votes cast, almost certainly will lead to more bonded debt and higher taxes to service that debt. This may make it more difficult for cities, counties and special districts to float bonds or raise taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Orange Unified School District trustees agreed to start an English immersion program for preschoolers, to hire a public relations officer and to tee off on a girls' golf program before adopting an annual budget of $145 million last week. The budget for the 1998-99 fiscal year is down by several million dollars from last year, largely because finance officials did not have to include the $3 million the district spent to renovate McPherson magnet school, which opened in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In 1993, a management audit of the Los Angeles Unified School District suggested that broad savings could be realized by paring back bureaucracy and interweaving computer systems. But making those very changes, a process that began even before the audit, sent district costs soaring in one area--overtime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1996 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As expected, a state education panel has rejected the Laguna Beach Unified School District's deficit-ridden budget, but it supported the district's actions to balance the spending plan and avoid future fiscal problems. "They essentially endorsed the plan that we had already working, and they confirmed the numbers we were working with," acting Supt. Jackson E. Parham said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1996
An audit of the Centinela Valley Union High School District in the Hawthorne area shows a number of financial and personnel irregularities that have resulted in one administrator being fired and another quitting. The district, with nearly 6,000 students, includes Leuzinger High School and Hawthorne High School. The $42,000 audit, commissioned in April 1995 by district Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The state superintendent of public instruction has ordered an investigation of an East Palo Alto school district's finances. The superintendent of the Ravenswood City School District, Charlie Mae Knight, is already facing 19 felony conflict-of-interest charges. Prosecutors say Knight stood to benefit when the school district gave loans to employees who rented housing from her or who owed her money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A San Francisco federal grand jury is probing the financially troubled West Fresno School District. The grand jury subpoenaed documents earlier this month about funds that were supposed to be spent to upgrade school technology, the Fresno Bee reported. The district received $6.5 million over three years.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Classes in the city schools were supposed to start Sept. 8. But 411,000 children spent last week on playgrounds, at home, in libraries and in YMCAs while the school board, the governor, the mayor, state lawmakers and city teachers tried to figure out how to balance the school district's budget, plagued by a $298-million deficit. Linda Guerrero, for one, was not happy about summer's extension.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|