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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1996 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
State Sen. Richard Polanco (D-Los Angeles) vowed Wednesday to counter a move to raid urban school districts' desegregation funds with an aggressive lobbying effort involving educators, parents and union representatives. "We're going to put together a full court press like they've not seen before," Polanco said. "This is a wrong move and a move against kids."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Howard Blume
The Los Angeles Unified School District, and seven others in California, will have more freedom to spend millions of federal dollars, create new ways to evaluate teachers and schools and replace restrictive testing and other rules, under a groundbreaking agreement announced Tuesday. The eight school systems are the first in the country to win such rights based on a direct appeal to the U.S. Department of Education. Previously, the department would consider exemptions to the No Child Left Behind law only if state governments applied.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a time, lawmakers working on California's new budget appeared to have settled one of the most touchy issues to emerge this year: funding for desegregation of big city schools, particularly in Los Angeles. But a deal, struck by the Senate-Assembly budget conference committee at 1 a.m. Tuesday, ran into major trouble 12 hours later, as Los Angeles Democrats charged that wealthy districts would gain at the expense of L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
GUADALUPE, Calif. - Vacant, century-old storefronts stand as bricks-and-mortar tombstones in this once-booming little farm town on California's Highway 1, where flatbeds piled with strawberries rumble by, rarely having to hit the brakes at crosswalks. Thrashed by the recession, officials here ran out of ways to cut expenses or boost tax revenue. So the town named after the patron saint of Mexico is throwing a Hail Mary. The mayor and City Council crafted a Nov. 6 ballot measure to change the city's name to Guadalupe Beach - even though the Pacific Ocean is nearly five miles to the west.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1996 | LUCILLE RENWICK
The state Board of Education on Thursday postponed making a decision on whether to hold local public hearings on proposed regulations governing bids to break up school districts. The school board pushed back discussion of the controversial regulations to its November meeting, citing the need to review materials and hold further discussions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1995 | CYNTHIA H. CRAFT and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Anticipating a key test in the state Senate next week, the Wilson Administration is poised to throw its support behind a bill easing the way for a breakup of the Los Angeles Unified School District. But the governor will refrain from taking a stance on the breakup, believing that it is an issue for local voters to decide, said Maureen DiMarco, Wilson's secretary for child development and education.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
After months of rambling public debate, a State Board of Education panel Thursday approved a new bilingual education policy that subtly shifts the emphasis from teaching method to results and promises individual districts the freedom to abandon the native language approach long favored by the state.
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
By February, nearly 1 million California primary grade students will be enjoying the time and space that come with sharing a classroom and teacher with only 19 others--thanks to the state's $1-billion class-size reduction program.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | CYNTHIA H. CRAFT and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Anticipating a key state Senate test next week, the Wilson Administration is poised to throw its support behind a bill easing the way for a breakup of the Los Angeles Unified School District. But Gov. Pete Wilson will refrain from taking a stance on the breakup itself, believing that it is an issue for local voters to decide, said Maureen DiMarco, Wilson's secretary for child development and education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Randolph Ward arrives at his job running the Compton schools, he comes with a bodyguard who picks him up every morning and drives him home at night. The bodyguard, a beefy man from a special California Highway Patrol division in charge of protecting state officials, sits patiently outside Ward's modest office and accompanies him on all school business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Some of California's largest school districts are plagued by persistent racial inequities that hurt minority youths' chances of going to college and force many students to attend substandard facilities, according to a recently released study by Californians for Justice.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | Special to The Times; This article was reported and written by Queena Sook Kim, Vicki McClure, Christopher John Merrill, Ioana Patringenaru and Gregory Winter of the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, under the direction of Times State Projects Editor Tim Reiterman
At least one thousand public school buildings in California's most populous and earthquake-prone regions harbor potential seismic hazards that district officials say they have been unable to fix. And 11,000 other buildings in Southern California and Bay Area districts surveyed for The Times have not been examined for seismic safety since being built. Four out of five of these unexamined buildings are decades old, the survey found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Randolph Ward arrives at his job running the Compton schools, he comes with a bodyguard who picks him up every morning and drives him home at night. The bodyguard, a beefy man from a special California Highway Patrol division in charge of protecting state officials, sits patiently outside Ward's modest office and accompanies him on all school business.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Budged by a looming ballot measure that would virtually dismantle bilingual education, state lawmakers Wednesday began pushing anew a more moderate bill that would give school districts leeway to decide how best to teach children not fluent in English. Ending months of squabbling among Democrats over details of the legislation, the Assembly Appropriations Committee voted 11 to 5 to send the measure, SB 6 by state Sen. Dede Alpert (D-Coronado), to the Assembly floor later this month.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
School nurse Marilyn Ashwell gulps the last of her tea, glances at her watch and springs to her feet. She has four minutes to make it from her office to La Tierra Elementary for an 11 a.m. routine with third-grader Andrea Santos. Walking briskly into the Mission Viejo school's health office, Ashwell greets the waiting 9-year-old: "Good morning, Andrea. Can we do it in eight minutes today?" Andrea smiles doubtfully, then nods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A consumer watchdog group Wednesday urged school officials to consider natural pesticides, rather than chemicals, when fighting termites or other insects and spraying campuses to control weeds. The nonprofit California Public Interest Research Group released a report showing that 87% of 54 school districts surveyed statewide use one or more of 27 chemical pesticides that are classified as potential carcinogens and harmful to human development of hormone, reproductive and nervous systems.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1997 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
School cafeterias have rarely been havens of innovation, unless you count discovering new ways to disguise leftover meatloaf. But the computer revolution is so pervasive that even cafeterias can't escape. More and more districts are using computer networks to manage their school lunch programs, arrange menus and even calculate nutritional content of meals. One of the companies that provides such systems, Panda, was sold last week by Alpha Microsystems of Santa Ana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1997 | KATE FOLMAR and REGINA HONG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hoping to nudge other school systems into action, Conejo Valley trustees are poised to start a lobbying campaign seeking full funding for the state's popular--but only partially paid for--class size reduction program. "I think that economically, [full funding] is the only feasible solution," said Trustee Richard Newman on Friday. "Districts like ours have expended large sums of money already.
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