Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSchool Districts Finances
IN THE NEWS

School Districts Finances

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996
Auditors began a special review of the Bonita Unified School District's financial records Tuesday at the request of the school board, ratcheting up concerns about the district where last month the superintendent was placed on paid leave pending the outcome of an investigation into undisclosed allegations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A San Francisco federal grand jury is probing the financially troubled West Fresno School District. The grand jury subpoenaed documents earlier this month about funds that were supposed to be spent to upgrade school technology, the Fresno Bee reported. The district received $6.5 million over three years.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1993 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After failing for three years to stabilize its shaky finances, the Inglewood Unified School District has been assigned a fiscal overseer by county education officials, joining only three districts countywide that are subject to such intervention. The county intervention is not as drastic as the state takeover of the Compton schools, which are now under the full control of a state-appointed overseer. But Inglewood's fiscal adviser, who is to be named within 10 days by County Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to get a clearer picture of the school district's finances, Orange Unified's board voted in a special meeting Monday to hire a business consultant. "For some years now, there's been arguments with regard to how much money the district really has," board President Robert Viviano said after the unanimous vote.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Classes in the city schools were supposed to start Sept. 8. But 411,000 children spent last week on playgrounds, at home, in libraries and in YMCAs while the school board, the governor, the mayor, state lawmakers and city teachers tried to figure out how to balance the school district's budget, plagued by a $298-million deficit. Linda Guerrero, for one, was not happy about summer's extension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997
The Los Angeles County Office of Education has sent a letter to the Garvey School District admonishing it to mend its ways. After reviewing claims of procedural violations, L.A. County Office of Education Supt. Donald W. Ingwerson sent a letter to district officials in Rosemead telling them to start complying with some of the district's own expenditure policies, which provide a framework for reimbursing board members for district-related meal and travel expenses. "The larger issue is . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1995 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For years, Long Beach school officials watched as other districts under court order to desegregate their classrooms received millions of dollars from the state to bus students and set up desegregation programs. Long Beach Unified, which was left out because it had voluntarily created desegregation programs, sued the state on charges that the district should be reimbursed for money it spent on programs to integrate schools and won.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1991 | JOHN PENNER
Ocean View School District officials, who previously proposed closing Crest View School, this week recommended that Haven View School also be closed next year because of declining enrollment. School officials have also tentatively abandoned their proposal to close Sun View School after parents mobilized against such plans.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON and SUSAN MARQUEZ OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County on Tuesday won Bankruptcy Court approval to disburse $5.7 billion to more than 200 cash-strapped cities, schools and government agencies, staving off a possibly devastating string of municipal defaults and bankruptcies. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge John E. Ryan approved the complex agreement during a five-hour hearing that overflowed from his courtroom into two nearby rooms.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
As the Los Angeles Unified School District embarks on a new way of funding its 650 schools, it finds itself stumbling over the most basic of questions: How much does it cost to educate a child?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The state superintendent of public instruction has ordered an investigation of an East Palo Alto school district's finances. The superintendent of the Ravenswood City School District, Charlie Mae Knight, is already facing 19 felony conflict-of-interest charges. Prosecutors say Knight stood to benefit when the school district gave loans to employees who rented housing from her or who owed her money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what one California education official calls a potential "sea change in school funding," state legislation would give an Orange County school district unprecedented freedom to spend $10 million in funds that usually are restricted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five flush years of reducing class sizes and adding programs, school districts suddenly find themselves trimming arts and science offerings, packing more students into classrooms and even laying off staff. Blame the energy crisis, which has dried up expected increases in state funding for education. Or the huge raises most districts handed out to teachers last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five flush years of reducing class sizes and adding programs, school districts suddenly find themselves trimming arts and science offerings, packing more students into classrooms and even laying off staff. Blame the energy crisis, which has dried up expected increases in state funding for education. Or the raises most districts handed out to teachers last year.
NEWS
April 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Four property-wealthy school districts filed suit in Austin against a Texas school finance reform law that requires them to share funds with poorer districts, claiming it is an unconstitutional property tax. Under the law known as "Robin Hood," 84 property-wealthy school districts are expected to share $522 million of their property-tax revenue with other districts in the current school year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2001 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Already considered a trendsetter in Orange County, the Irvine Unified School District has been sponsoring brainstorming sessions among more than 50 students, teachers and administrators to map out a vision for the district's future. Called the Future Force Committee, the group is trying to dissect and plan for crucial issues cropping up in the district, including fiscal stability, attendance boundaries, technology training, school security, teacher training and parent involvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1995 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
In the wake of losses from the collapse of the county's investment pool, the Newport-Mesa Unified School District board voted unanimously this week to lay off 10 non-teaching employees. The layoffs, coupled with reduced hours for two other employees, are expected to save the district $250,000 a year in salaries and benefits. The district, with an annual budget of $86 million, had $80 million in the county pool, which collapsed in December. Of that, $47 million was borrowed to invest for profit.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is agreement on one thing here on the lush seacoast of immaculate Marin, California's richest and perhaps loveliest county: The local school district is in terrible trouble. In this region of tall trees and big houses, fancy cars and fair complexions, nearly a third of the students in the district are in special education classes, overall performance is way below state standards and tempers are near the boiling point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2001 | From Times staff and wire reports
An anti-tax group that opposed the successful November initiative making it easier for local school districts to win construction bond approval has decided not to try to overturn the measure next year. Proposition 39 lowered the vote needed for local school district bonds from two-thirds to 55%. The major opponent, the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn., had filed a proposed initiative last month, aimed for the March 2002 ballot, to restore the two-thirds vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2001 | From Times staff and wire reports
Assemblywoman Helen Thomson (D-Davis) has introduced a bill to rectify earlier legislation that denied certain California school districts with low absence rates rewards that others could earn. The earlier legislation, passed in 1997, changed the way absences are counted and was intended to reward districts that reduced their absence rates. But certain districts lost out on financial rewards because their absence rates were already low before the legislation took effect.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|