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NEWS
June 10, 1999 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an abrupt accounting turnaround, Gov. Gray Davis and Democratic lawmakers resolved a brewing dispute over education funding by simply stipulating that 41,000 children won't show up at California's public schools next September. The budgetary revisionism has the impact of freeing $192.7 million for local school districts to spend as they see fit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a lengthy dispute, Gov. Gray Davis on Tuesday authorized the state to pay local school districts $620 million to finance state-ordered special education programs. The payments, agreed to in November when the state and the districts settled a 20-year-old lawsuit, include $520 million to reimburse past debts. The districts had alleged that they were owed as much as $1.9 billion for state-required programs that assist children with an array of disabilities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a lengthy dispute, Gov. Gray Davis on Tuesday authorized the state to pay local school districts $620 million to finance state-ordered special education programs. The payments, agreed to in November when the state and the districts settled a 20-year-old lawsuit, include $520 million to reimburse past debts. The districts had alleged that they were owed as much as $1.9 billion for state-required programs that assist children with an array of disabilities.
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES and JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state has reached a settlement in a 20-year-old lawsuit filed by 10 California school districts and education offices, including Newport-Mesa Unified in Orange County, that will boost funding for special education across the state. Under the plan, unveiled Thursday, the state will pay $520 million to reimburse school districts and counties for past costs relating to special education. The state also will kick in $100 million annually from now on.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1998 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the State Board of Education said they will discuss at a meeting today whether to block the allocation of Proposition 227 funds earmarked for adult education programs under investigation by the FBI. Federal authorities are conducting an investigation of the state education department's allocation of millions of dollars in public funds to community organizations that provide adult education, and the possible misuse of funds by 10 of those groups.
NEWS
October 14, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As class-size-reduction programs sink in statewide, school officials scanning their suddenly bloated budgets and student enrollment rosters are looking ahead and questioning whether they can afford to maintain smaller classes. With the help of state funding, all but one of Orange County's 24 school districts have been able to reduce class sizes this year in the first grade to a maximum of 20 pupils per teacher. The program, begun in July by Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1995 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
The state has allocated $928,000 to Newport-Mesa Unified School District for instructional material, maintenance and educational technology. The money was apportioned to school districts and county offices of education through a voter-approved block grant. At today's district board meeting, trustees will seek suggestions from the public on how to spend the money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1995 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Los Angeles Unified school board members divvied up much of a $31.5-million windfall of state money Monday night, after hours of debating which of many needs were neediest. The money is ostensibly a one-time grant, not to be used for continuing programs or recurring expenses. But even in this relatively good budget year for the district, definitions of one-time uses become fuzzy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1992 | JON NALICK
Although the Westminster School District board cut $542,500 from its 1992-93 budget to avert a potential shortfall, school officials believe that the state budget crisis will require more budget reductions soon. "I believe this is the winter of our despair in California," Supt. Gail Wickstrom said Thursday shortly before the Board of Trustees considered which positions and programs to eliminate.
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | From Associated Press
A divided state Supreme Court on Thursday left intact a lower-court ruling on state aid to local governments that could cost the state billions of dollars. The cost prediction was contained in the state's appeal of a ruling in December by an appeals court in Sacramento that set broad standards for the state's obligation to reimburse school districts for federally required programs. "We fear that it could have a very severe economic impact on an already depleted state budget," Deputy Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2000 | Associated Press
School districts that believe the state owes them money for special education services provided over the last 20 years can now file a claim with the state. State Controller Kathleen Connell has forms available on her office's Internet site, http://www.sco.ca.gov. Districts have until Dec. 5 to submit claims to be reimbursed by the state for eight special education programs that they believe were not given sufficient state funds since 1980.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1999 | Renee Moilanen, (949) 574-4208
The Saddleback Valley Unified School District on Tuesday approved a $177,000 state grant for the Community-Based English Tutoring program, which provides English instruction to parents or community members. Trustee Don Sedgwick commended the program, saying it enabled parents with limited English proficiency to read books to their children. "I'm glad to see the district taking advantage of the funds," he said.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an abrupt accounting turnaround, Gov. Gray Davis and Democratic lawmakers resolved a brewing dispute over education funding by simply stipulating that 41,000 children won't show up at California's public schools next September. The budgetary revisionism has the impact of freeing $192.7 million for local school districts to spend as they see fit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1998 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the State Board of Education said they will discuss at a meeting today whether to block the allocation of Proposition 227 funds earmarked for adult education programs under investigation by the FBI. Federal authorities are conducting an investigation of the state education department's allocation of millions of dollars in public funds to community organizations that provide adult education, and the possible misuse of funds by 10 of those groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1996 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A jubilant Los Angeles Unified School District announced Monday that it had scaled back first- and second-grade class size in at least 86% of its elementary schools, but followed that news with the sobering estimate that state funding for the effort will fall $70 million short. Furthermore, tallies of fall enrollment released Monday show the district has experienced its largest single-year growth, rising nearly 3% to 667,624 students.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The cost of creating enough schoolrooms to implement the state's highly popular class-size reduction effort far exceeds the funds allocated, state officials said Wednesday, meaning that school districts around California--including Los Angeles Unified--will either have to scale back their plans or dip deeply into local budgets.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Richmond school board has ousted Supt. Walter Marks amid concern that he was jeopardizing the district's chances of getting a second emergency bailout loan from the state. The district could run out of money by next February, one state legislator said. The district, which faces an estimated $25-million shortfall for next year, received a $9-million loan from the state earlier this year and is forced to ask for an additional $25 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1991
The Santa Ana Unified School District Board of Education this week took the first step toward building yet another school to house the district's rapidly growing population. The board directed district officials to apply for $27 million in state funding to build what would be the district's ninth intermediate school. There are seven intermediate schools in the district, but enrollment projections show that two more will need to be built by 1998.
NEWS
October 14, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As class-size-reduction programs sink in statewide, school officials scanning their suddenly bloated budgets and student enrollment rosters are looking ahead and questioning whether they can afford to maintain smaller classes. With the help of state funding, all but one of Orange County's 24 school districts have been able to reduce class sizes this year in the first grade to a maximum of 20 pupils per teacher. The program, begun in July by Gov.
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