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School Districts Texas

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NEWS
April 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Austin, Texas, school district and a deputy superintendent were indicted on charges of tampering with statewide tests to make their students appear smarter. The Austin Independent School District and Deputy Supt. Margaret Kay Psencik allegedly altered identification numbers on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills tests of 16 students who had performed poorly so that the exams would not be counted.
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NEWS
April 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Austin, Texas, school district and a deputy superintendent were indicted on charges of tampering with statewide tests to make their students appear smarter. The Austin Independent School District and Deputy Supt. Margaret Kay Psencik allegedly altered identification numbers on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills tests of 16 students who had performed poorly so that the exams would not be counted.
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SCIENCE
March 17, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Texas researchers have found a possible link between autism and mercury in the air and water. Studying individual school districts in Texas, the epidemiologists found that those districts with the highest levels of mercury in the environment also had the highest rates of special education students and autism diagnoses. The study does not prove that mercury causes autism, cautioned the lead author, Raymond F.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | DAVID MARANISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
The nation's third-largest public education system entered a period of uncertainty and potential financial calamity Monday night when the state of Texas failed to enact a plan equalizing funding for rich and poor school districts. The Texas Supreme Court last fall declared the present system unconstitutionally inequitable.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
They're calling it the swat heard 'round the world -- and its echo is still reverberating. On Monday night, the school board in Springtown, Texas, voted to allow students to be paddled by employees of the opposite gender if their parents give written permission. The board's previous policy permitted only same-gender paddling. No one really argued with the idea of corporal punishment; at issue was the question of who gets to administer it, specifically can an adult male swat young girls?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1992 | MARESA ARCHER
Three branches of the Orange County Library will commemorate national Banned Books Week with displays and readings of banned books. The annual event is held to alert the public to the ongoing problem of book banning, which organizers contend is a violation of the First Amendment's guarantee of free speech. "People seem to think book banning is something that happened in the '50s and '60s.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1989 | SUZANNE GAMBOA, Associated Press
Howard Keeling walks to the front of a school bus, pulls a hose from a nearby canopy to a valve below the vehicle's yellow hood, then tops its tank with compressed natural gas. It's not much different than filling up with gasoline, but it's worth more than $18,000 a year to Keeling's school district, when multiplied for a 65-bus fleet. Garland, the Dallas suburb where Keeling is vehicle maintenance supervisor for the school district, is a model for efforts across Texas to convert public transportation to cleaner, cheaper natural gas fuel.
SPORTS
April 28, 1991 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was that beeping again. From where he sat, behind the wheel of his blue, four-door BMW, it really appeared as if the only thing John Lucas is addicted to these days is his car phone. After a brief conversation, Lucas hung up the phone. The way he looked, in his neatly tailored suit, he could have been a businessman, lawyer or developer. He didn't look like a recovering addict.
OPINION
April 26, 2005 | ROBERT SCHEER
Notice the price of gasoline lately? Isn't it great that we have secured Iraq's oil? And as Congress signs off on yet another huge supplementary grant to supposedly protect U.S. interests in the Mideast, our president pathetically begs his Saudi buddies for a price break. As the fall of Rome showed, imperialism never pays.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1998 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Three Los Angeles Board of Education members traveled across Texas recently to gather impressions of the statewide school reform program considered among the nation's most effective. The first lesson they learned was one of humility, according to board member Jeff Horton. "In Los Angeles we're so arrogant about ourselves, we think if it didn't happen here first it can't be worth much," Horton said.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | ROBERT GREENE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Not quite a century ago, farmers in remote parts of the country started turning to a government handbook for the latest knowledge about agriculture and rural life. With articles on everything from "grain smuts" to making kerosene emulsion insecticides, the new Yearbook of Agriculture told farmers just about all there was to know to be more productive. As communication improved and the number of farmers declined, topics strayed from agriculture and demand for the yearbook fell.
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