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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999 | SYLVIA WESTPHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday ordered county health officials to investigate cancer cases among teachers and staff at two schools located near landfills. According to a motion passed Tuesday, the county's Department of Health Services must look into reports of seemingly high cancer rates, also known as a "cancer cluster," among employees at Towne Avenue School in Carson and Polytechnic High School in Sun Valley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999 | SYLVIA WESTPHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday ordered county health officials to investigate cancer cases among teachers and staff at two schools located near landfills. According to a motion passed Tuesday, the county's Department of Health Services must look into reports of seemingly high cancer rates, also known as a "cancer cluster," among employees at Towne Avenue School in Carson and Polytechnic High School in Sun Valley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday ordered county health officials to investigate cancer cases among teachers and staff at two schools located near landfills. According to a motion passed Tuesday, the county's Department of Health Services must look into reports of seemingly high cancer rates, also known as a "cancer cluster," among employees at Towne Avenue School in Carson and Polytechnical High School in Sun Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday ordered county health officials to investigate cancer cases among teachers and staff at two schools located near landfills. According to a motion passed Tuesday, the county's Department of Health Services must look into reports of seemingly high cancer rates, also known as a "cancer cluster," among employees at Towne Avenue School in Carson and Polytechnical High School in Sun Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1997
The Service Employees International Union--which represents 120,000 city workers, school employees and health care workers, among others--voted Saturday to endorse Tom Hayden's bid to be mayor of Los Angeles. About 100 union members attended an almost daylong question-and-answer session with Hayden, two candidates for City Council and two school board contenders.
OPINION
August 29, 1993
I am responding to the front-page piece of Aug. 20 on the possibility of Los Angeles selling part of the historic Central Library to Philip Morris Capital Co. How could this even be considered when we're finally starting to show some hopeful progress in ridding ourselves of this deadly and destructive industry? Proponents say the library deal would save taxpayers an estimated $15 million in the long run. I say let's save taxpayers' money now, by not subsidizing tobacco growers to furnish us with a deadly substance that is a leading cause of deaths.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | KAREN DENNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Howard Bennett's name should be Howard Benefit. For four years, the Culver City High School English teacher has made a pest of himself to the school board and the school district's two competing teachers unions with his campaign to ob tain lifetime health benefits for district employees. Somewhere along the line, they started listening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993 | HENRY CHU and JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles school board member Roberta Weintraub, who won office as an antibusing leader and went on to become the board's longest-serving representative, said Tuesday she will not seek reelection to her San Fernando Valley seat this spring and will instead turn her energies toward breaking up the mammoth school district.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Eddie Lemon has an associate's degree from Taft College near Bakersfield. He's certified to work as a sheet metal operator and to drive a forklift. He has experience as a dishwasher and a cabinetmaker. He also has a criminal record. The 47-year-old Lemon believes that has made it all but impossible for him to find a job in one of the worst economies in decades. And as prisons are forced to reduce their inmate populations because of overcrowding and budget shortages, some economists fear that could lead many of them back to a life of crime.
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