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NEWS
September 2, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON and ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The school locker, long feared as a repository of drugs and weapons, is making a comeback. Some administrators are returning the metal boxes to campus, figuring it's better than creating a generation of students with back problems. In one Orange County school district, a board member who watched a student wobble and fall over from the weight of her backpack has proposed reinstalling lockers in middle schools.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2005 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
A former Los Angeles Unified School District curriculum director has been accused by district officials of secretly ordering more than $4 million of his own, unauthorized math instruction materials for use in city classrooms.
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NEWS
June 27, 1990 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and JOEL SAPPELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Emerging from years of internal strife and public scandal, the Scientology movement has embarked on a sweeping and sophisticated campaign to gain new influence in America. The goal is to refurbish the tarnished image of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and elevate him to the ranks of history's great humanitarians and thinkers. By so doing, the church hopes to broaden the acceptability of Hubbard's Scientology teachings and attract millions of new members.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2002 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a little extra credit for teachers in the economic stimulus bill that President Bush signed a week ago. The new law, which primarily affects businesses and unemployment benefits, allows teachers who buy books and supplies for their classrooms to deduct as much as $250 a year for these expenses, even if they don't usually itemize deductions. The modest break advances a growing trend of providing tax relief for the nation's teachers--often as a way to lure people into the field.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1999 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether a child is dreading the end of summer or counting the days until he or she can return to the classroom, one thing about the back to school season is certain: Parents are going to be shopping. Clothes, lunch boxes, gym shorts, No. 2 pencils and book bags aside, this year parents are finding the return to school potentially more hectic--and expensive--than ever as schools lean increasingly on families for the everyday supplies that keep a classroom running.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Students at Valencia High School will get a back-to-school surprise when they arrive on campus in September--closed lockers. Adding to a trend that is becoming increasingly common in Orange County schools, school officials announced at Tuesday's meeting of the Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District board that they have outlawed the familiar storage places.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Sophomore Angeles Herrera hurries down the halls of Fremont High School with a single slim notebook tucked under her arm. She carries no textbooks because she has none. Textbooks remain the essential guide to education, second in importance only to competent teachers. But book shortages have become so common in big-city high schools that Angeles doesn't know she should expect more--that, in fact, state law guarantees her a text for every class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1989 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're a rite of passage, a symbol of adolescence. But school lockers are now becoming history in a small but slowly growing number of Southern California schools. Three Long Beach middle schools are the latest to lock lockers for good and force students to, ever so grudgingly, schlep their books to and from home. "It's too hard to carry all your books. Let me show you my history book," said Jefferson Middle School student Jason Knowles, displaying a thick text.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1998 | GARY CHAPMAN, Gary Chapman is director of the 21st Century Project at the University of Texas at Austin
Last month, I testified at a hearing in the Texas State Capitol about the proposal under consideration here to replace public school textbooks with laptop computers and CD-ROMs. I attended this event at the invitation of Dr. Jack Christie, the chairman of the Texas State Board of Education and the man behind this idea. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2000 | By ANN L. KIM and KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A charge of economic bias has left the Orange Unified School District with a tricky balancing act: weighing the value of a proposed laptop computer class against the painful reality that many families cannot afford the cost of a new computer.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON and ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The school locker, long feared as a repository of drugs and weapons, is making a comeback. Some administrators are returning the metal boxes to campus, figuring it's better than creating a generation of students with back problems. In one Orange County school district, a board member who watched a student wobble and fall over from the weight of her backpack has proposed reinstalling lockers in middle schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2001 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The desk of Sheawana Armstrong, textbook clerk, sits in a long, windowless room off the school library at Compton High School. On the right side of the room, two dozen shelves hold more than 1,000 textbooks as backups in case of theft or loss. On the left, the walls are lined with hundreds of extra copies of fine literature--Shakespeare's plays, Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World," the Japanese internment history "Farewell to Manzanar."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The elderly gentleman called the Newport-Mesa schools, offering to donate hundreds of bottles of cleaner for computer monitors. Administrators were ecstatic; the bill for such necessities can easily add up. When the boxes arrived last year, warehouse manager Larry Ponce and his staff eagerly opened them but were dismayed to see printed in bright red letters at the bottom of each bottle: "Keep Away From Children." "Why did he donate that to the schools?" Ponce asked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2001 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battered little yellow school bus filled with notebooks, pens, paint and fruit bounced into Los Angeles looking for donations for a new indigenous school in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. At the wheel was Chris Farmer, a 29-year-old UC Berkeley graduate hoping to entice others to join him on his Zapatista mission that would take him from Santa Cruz to the jungles of Chiapas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chapman University may give next year's incoming freshmen more than dorm keys, course catalogs and the campus telephone book. Odds are good that next year the university will hand them a laptop computer loaded with software. Chapman may join a growing number of colleges and universities nationwide--and one of the few in the West--that regard computers as so important they provide them to incoming students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | Alex Katz, (714) 966-5977
The nonprofit Orange County Rescue Mission on Tuesday will give more than 1,000 new backpacks filled with school supplies to students at Edison Elementary School on South Orange Avenue. This is the 10th year that the group has donated backpacks and supplies to schoolchildren in underprivileged areas of the county.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Novels, textbooks and other teaching aids in the country's public schools faced mounting challenges from parents and religious groups during the 1990-91 academic year, according to a study released Wednesday by a censorship watchdog group. California led the nation in the number of reported battles over school materials, which included works such as J.D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2005 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
A former Los Angeles Unified School District curriculum director has been accused by district officials of secretly ordering more than $4 million of his own, unauthorized math instruction materials for use in city classrooms.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Office superstores used to be better known for brown accordion files and pink "While You Were Out" pads, but product-hungry schoolchildren now have the stores lining their aisles with bright gel-ink pens. The warehouse-style stationery stores offer a dazzling array: neon gel pens, metallic gel pens, and the most important product this year, according to 12-year-old Anna Engel--"super-marble" gel pens that write three colors at once. Every fall, stores such as Staples Inc., Office Depot Inc.
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