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School Exit

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OPINION
May 20, 2006
Re "No exit," Opinion, May 17 Erin Aubry Kaplan's column was laughable. What good is spending 12 years in school if you're not required to learn anything? The exit exam makes a high school diploma valid. I doubt Kaplan would use a lawyer who never passed the bar exam or a doctor who didn't graduate from medical school. How about those who can't pass their driver's tests? Give them a license anyway? Personal responsibility is one of the first things a child should learn. Blaming the school system, racism, poverty or big government won't get you very far in life; working hard will.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Two-thirds of Los Angeles Unified sophomores passed the state high school exit exam on their first try, a record number that reflects six years of consecutive improvement, the school district announced Wednesday. Supt. John Deasy credited the success to a more targeted effort to use data to identify students struggling with the reading, writing and math skills and to give them more help. "The results are the best I could ever have imagined," Deasy said. "I'm very proud. " The pass rate reflects a 23 percentage point gain from 44% in 2003-04.
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OPINION
October 6, 2002
Re "State Ponders Delaying Exit Exams Due to Failures," Oct. 1: During the deliberations of the High School Exit Exam Advisory Panel from July 1999 to January 2002, I, along with many others, suggested delaying the consequences of the exam from applying to the class of 2004 to the class of 2008. My students have the benefit of a qualified mathematics teacher who majored in math in college. Many students in our state are not so fortunate. They are not being taught by qualified math teachers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of photos of standardized tests have begun to appear on social-networking sites in California, raising concerns about test security and cheating by students. In the worst-case scenario, the photos could lead to invalidating test scores for entire schools or prevent the state from using certain tests. For now, officials have warned school districts to heighten test security and investigate breaches. Students are not allowed to have access to cellphones or other devices that can take pictures when the tests are administered.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California should seriously consider postponing implementation of its new high school exit exam for a year or two, according to a report by an independent evaluator that was presented to the state Legislature on Wednesday. Although much progress has been made in developing the high-stakes exam, "a great deal remains to be done" before the test can be successfully administered, the report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 80% of California ninth-graders took the high school exit exam when it was given for the first time last month. In a letter to superintendents, Delaine Eastin, state superintendent of public instruction, congratulated districts on "such fine participation" in this year's voluntary exam. About 395,000 ninth-graders, out of 484,000, took the reading and writing portion of the test. The California Department of Education expects that even more students took the mathematics test.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2002 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge who is considering a challenge to the state's mandated high school exit examination said Thursday that he does not intend to block the test. "I am not of the opinion I want to stop this entire process," U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer said during a court hearing here. "I am of the opinion a test should go forward."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2006 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
In the security line at the Sacramento airport, Jack O'Connell keeps seeing people he knows. Here comes a former finance chief for Gov. Gray Davis. There's a former assemblyman and mayor of Sacramento. Kicking off his black-tasseled loafers, O'Connell passes through the metal detector. At the gate for the Southwest Airlines flight to Santa Ana, more friends: a prominent political strategist. An assistant to the state education secretary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All ninth-graders in Santa Ana will sit through an extra hour of school starting in September to prepare them for the state's upcoming high school exit exam and ultimately for college. Starting at 7:15 a.m., freshmen who are behind in their academic skills will take remedial courses in math and English. More proficient students will take regular courses that they can apply to high school graduation. School officials say the $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell is expected today to appeal to the state Supreme Court a judge's decision to strike down the California high school exit exam. Last week, an Alameda County Superior Court judge issued a preliminary injunction against the exam, which students were required to pass to graduate. He ruled that the test presents an unfair hurdle to many poor and minority students attending subpar schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz
Brandy Rice eyed the test question. She thought of what her tutor directed her to do: Read the entire sentence. Read all the answers. Instead of playing multiple-choice roulette with the answers as she had so many times before, she followed the directions. Rice, 26, was one of 20 Compton Adult School students in a tutoring program for the California High School Exit Examination. The tutors weren't teachers, but teenagers from Palos Verdes High School. The tutors carpooled from the green, laid-back beach community on a hill to Compton every Saturday for five weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Nearly one in 10 students in the class of 2009 did not pass the state's high school exit exam, which is required to receive a diploma. The results, released Wednesday, were nearly stagnant compared with the previous year. By the end of their senior year, 90.6% of students in the graduating class had passed the two-part exam, compared with 90.4% in the class of 2008. "These gains are incremental, but they are in fact significant and they are a true testimony to the tremendous work being done by our professional educators . . . as well as our students," said state Supt.
OPINION
June 27, 2009
California is broke, but kids still need to know how to read and do basic algebra. It's an insult to the aspirations of California students that legislators moved to kill the high school exit exam :a=latimes_1min&feed:c=topstories&feed:i=47535918&nopaging=1 as a graduation requirement. Excusing it as a budget move, all six Democratic legislators on the budget conference committee voted quickly, with little debate and no real public airing.
OPINION
April 24, 2009
It could be, as university researchers conjecture, that negative stereotypes of minorities and girls lead these two groups to perform worse on California's high school exit exam. That doesn't mean, however, that the state should back off from the exam intended to require a minimum level of competency among those who receive a diploma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2009 | Mitchell Landsberg
California's high school exit exam is keeping disproportionate numbers of girls and non-whites from graduating, even when they are just as capable as white boys, according to a study released Tuesday. It also found that the exam, which became a graduation requirement in 2007, has "had no positive effect on student achievement."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
As early as fourth grade, students who will be at risk of failing the high school exit exam -- a state requirement to earn a diploma -- can be identified based on grades, classroom behavior and test scores, according to a new study released Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2000
Re "State Easing Up on Exit Exam for High School," Dec. 8: With regard to high school exit exams, it seems to me that a good test of the exam would be to give it to all the high school and college teachers to see how well they would do. My guess is that many would not do very well. As a high school tutor for the past five years, I have looked through some of the SAT tests and have found them to be very complicated and confusing (almost as bad as some of the algebra textbooks). In addition, I found several errors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1999
Steve Scott's "Spoilers, Left and Right, Haunt Davis' Honeymoon" (Opinion, Jan. 24) implied that I am not in favor of a high school exit exam. Gov. Gray Davis' exit exam proposal is an idea that I strongly support. My concern has been, and is, that by 2003 our students have the necessary academic tools to pass such a rigorous exit exam. Last year, I sponsored legislation to require all students to take more rigorous courses, such as algebra and geometry. Unfortunately, the legislation did not receive strong support.
OPINION
August 16, 2007
Liliana Valenzuela was a high school senior with a 3.84 grade-point average who ranked 12th in her class. She could not, however, pass the English portion of California's high school exit exam and, by law, was barred from graduating. Valenzuela became the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit asserting that students should not be denied diplomas because their schools failed to prepare them for the exam.
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