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School Exit Exam

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2000
I applaud Robert Levine's "Schools: Standards Are Important, but Money Is Vital" (Opinion, May 21). As a member of the California High School Exit Exam Advisory Panel, I, along with others, have listened to testimony from many experts as we have worked to implement a testing of "standards." The experts from the Texas statewide testing system have given our panel testimony that emphasizes the need for a huge influx of financial resources if students are to be held accountable to pass such a high-stakes exam.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The state's top education official has proposed reducing the number of standardized tests that students must take next year as California moves to a new testing system. Under a plan put forward Tuesday by state Supt. of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson, second-graders would not be tested in math and English next year. Most high school tests would also be dropped. If lawmakers approve the plan, schools would be evaluated on a narrower range of test data for a period of one year, before a new system is put in place.
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NEWS
July 6, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California should seriously consider postponing implementation of its new high school exit exam for a year or two, according to a report by an independent evaluator that was presented to the state Legislature on Wednesday. Although much progress has been made in developing the high-stakes exam, "a great deal remains to be done" before the test can be successfully administered, the report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Two-thirds of Los Angeles Unified sophomores passed the state high school exit exam on their first try, a record number that reflects six years of consecutive improvement, the school district announced Wednesday. Supt. John Deasy credited the success to a more targeted effort to use data to identify students struggling with the reading, writing and math skills and to give them more help. "The results are the best I could ever have imagined," Deasy said. "I'm very proud. " The pass rate reflects a 23 percentage point gain from 44% in 2003-04.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Advocates for children with learning disabilities challenged California's new high school exit exam in federal court Tuesday, saying the test violates U.S. law by discriminating against children with dyslexia and other disorders. The class-action suit, filed in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2006 | From Times staff reports
More than 400,000 high school seniors have passed the California High School Exit Exam, according to final results announced Thursday by the state Department of Education. An additional 819 students passed the test in July, raising the overall pass rate to 91.4%. Nearly 38,000 students failed to pass and were urged to attend community colleges, adult schools or return as seniors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Advocates for the disabled filed a motion for a preliminary injunction in federal court Friday to halt California's new high school exit exam in March. California students are not prepared to take the statewide test, said Sidney Wolinsky, an attorney for Disability Rights Advocates, the Oakland-based nonprofit that filed the lawsuit against the state Board of Education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2006 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
A day after indicating he was prepared to strike down California's controversial high school exit exam, an Oakland judge reiterated his position Tuesday but delayed issuing a final ruling. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Robert B. Freedman postponed his decision after lawyers for the state raised questions at a hearing about whether a temporary injunction against the test should apply to all students who have failed the exam or only to the handful who filed the lawsuit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2000 | CAROL JAGO, Carol Jago teaches English at Santa Monica High School and directs the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. She can be reached at jago@gseis.ucla.edu
Beginning with students in ninth grade and forever after--or at least until California law changes--no one will be awarded a high school diploma without passing an exit exam. Putting aside my personal feelings about the mandate, I worry that so few parents and students know this. I also worry that high schools are unprepared for how the test is likely to change how they do business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2006 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
A group of 10 high school students and their parents filed a lawsuit Wednesday in San Francisco Superior Court challenging the controversial exit exam nearly all California public high school students must pass to receive a diploma, on the grounds that it adds an unfair hurdle to graduation. The case, filed against the state Board of Education and the state superintendent of public instruction, seeks an injunction to immediately suspend the consequences of the mandatory exam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of photos of standardized tests have begun to appear on social-networking sites in California, raising concerns about test security and cheating by students. In the worst-case scenario, the photos could lead to invalidating test scores for entire schools or prevent the state from using certain tests. For now, officials have warned school districts to heighten test security and investigate breaches. Students are not allowed to have access to cellphones or other devices that can take pictures when the tests are administered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Nearly one in 10 students in the class of 2009 did not pass the state's high school exit exam, which is required to receive a diploma. The results, released Wednesday, were nearly stagnant compared with the previous year. By the end of their senior year, 90.6% of students in the graduating class had passed the two-part exam, compared with 90.4% in the class of 2008. "These gains are incremental, but they are in fact significant and they are a true testimony to the tremendous work being done by our professional educators . . . as well as our students," said state Supt.
OPINION
June 27, 2009
California is broke, but kids still need to know how to read and do basic algebra. It's an insult to the aspirations of California students that legislators moved to kill the high school exit exam :a=latimes_1min&feed:c=topstories&feed:i=47535918&nopaging=1 as a graduation requirement. Excusing it as a budget move, all six Democratic legislators on the budget conference committee voted quickly, with little debate and no real public airing.
OPINION
April 24, 2009
It could be, as university researchers conjecture, that negative stereotypes of minorities and girls lead these two groups to perform worse on California's high school exit exam. That doesn't mean, however, that the state should back off from the exam intended to require a minimum level of competency among those who receive a diploma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2009 | Mitchell Landsberg
California's high school exit exam is keeping disproportionate numbers of girls and non-whites from graduating, even when they are just as capable as white boys, according to a study released Tuesday. It also found that the exam, which became a graduation requirement in 2007, has "had no positive effect on student achievement."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2008 | Howard Blume and Ben Welsh, Times Staff Writers
Hundreds of California high schools met this year's federal academic targets released Thursday only because the state uses easier standards for high schools than for elementary and middle schools, a Times analysis has found. But even with this boost, just 48% of the state's high schools met the federal standard of "adequate yearly progress" in this year's results. The Times analysis identified about 300 high schools that were reported as meeting all federal standards even though their combined proficiency scores in math or English language arts on the California standards tests fell below proficiency levels required for federal compliance this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 80% of California ninth-graders took the high school exit exam when it was given for the first time last month. In a letter to superintendents, Delaine Eastin, state superintendent of public instruction, congratulated districts on "such fine participation" in this year's voluntary exam. About 395,000 ninth-graders, out of 484,000, took the reading and writing portion of the test. The California Department of Education expects that even more students took the mathematics test.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
As early as fourth grade, students who will be at risk of failing the high school exit exam -- a state requirement to earn a diploma -- can be identified based on grades, classroom behavior and test scores, according to a new study released Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
As early as fourth grade, students who will be at risk of failing the high school exit exam -- a state requirement to earn a diploma -- can be identified based on grades, classroom behavior and test scores, according to a new study released Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2007 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
More seniors are passing the state's high school exit exam, but failure rates among poor and minority students remain disproportionately high, and dropouts are not counted in the state's numbers, the state Department of Education said Thursday. As of May, the pass rate for the class of 2007 was 93.3%, a 2.1 percentage point increase over the class of 2006 for that period. The pass rate also was higher for some lower-scoring groups, including African American students, who saw a gain of 4.
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