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BUSINESS
April 19, 1993 | Associated Press
Computers roll in by the truckload--ancient Apples, old IBMs and hoary Hewlett-Packards. Once destined for the dump, the castoffs are being saved, spruced up and shipped to schools. Thousands of working machines and others in need of slight repair are being thrown away by corporations and government agencies trying to keep up with the latest advances.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- State lawmakers will take their first official look at Gov. Jerry Brown's plan to overhaul the state's public school financing system at a Sacramento hearing on Thursday. The Senate Budget Committee is scheduled to hear from Brown administration officials, the Legislature's own budget analysts and state schools superintendent Tom Torlakson as they discuss Brown's plan to give school districts more control over their budgets while directing more state dollars to districts that serve higher numbers of poor and non-native English-speaking students.
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OPINION
August 16, 1992
Although I commend Weintraub for his excellent examination of public school finances, I am disappointed that he failed to raise questions about sacred cows that for too long have been grazing contentedly and uncorralled on the state's limited finanical pastures. One such unquestioned tradition is that of spending untold sums on interscholastic athletics in high schools. I will give one example. At one of the high schools in the Santa Ana Unified School District, a science classroom was recently converted into a football office for the school's dozen or so football coaches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2004 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
A deal Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger made last year with one of the state's most powerful political groups may be coming back to haunt him as he copes with a projected $6.7-billion budget gap. The problem for the governor: He promised schools he would not cut their funding any more or block scheduled increases. But now those increases are projected to boost education funding by hundreds of millions of dollars, money that lawmakers are eyeing to narrow the shortfall.
NEWS
August 15, 1985 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
Jerry Weinstein, a nine-year veteran of the Beverly Hills Board of Education, has announced that he will not seek reelection in November. His decision makes school board President Fred Stern the only incumbent running for one of two open slots on the board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1991 | TAMARA HENRY and WILLIAM M. WELCH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For six months, Shirley Carter started work the same way--with a phone call to a fourth-grader in a poor San Diego neighborhood to make sure he got to school. She would let the phone ring until he woke up and answered. Then he would get himself dressed and trudge off to school, his mother never awaking from the previous night's drinking. "One morning something came up and I couldn't call," said Carter, a truant officer whose job and obsession is to keep troubled kids in school.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The public school in rural Thomson, Ill., is so strapped for cash that it cannot fix a badly leaking roof and older students must drive miles to other towns for physics, chemistry and advanced math courses. Still, not long ago, administrators found a cost-free way to replace some chipped and broken classroom furniture. The "new" desks and chairs were yanked from a dumpster where they had been discarded by a much wealthier school down the road.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Shortly after formally declaring himself a candidate for governor, Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp, dressed in his green sweater, jeans and white sneakers, was standing at Lover's Point in Monterey and touting his support for "Big Green," the environmental initiative on the November ballot. Then somebody asked what he believed was the state's most pressing issue. "I've always said that education would be my first priority as governor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
Everywoman's Village, a longtime community institution that had been battling for financial survival, recently closed its doors. The school, which opened in 1963 and became a model for women's education, was unable to raise enough money to continue offering classes, Executive Director Laura Selwyn said Saturday. Last summer, the school's board of directors announced it would close in November unless sufficient money could be raised to cover an $80,000 deficit.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Texas system of financing schools remains unconstitutional despite this year's overhaul by the Legislature, a judge ruled today. State District Judge Scott McCown said that the $14-billion-a-year system is still flawed but he deferred making any immediate changes, giving the Legislature until Sept. 1, 1991, to act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A San Francisco federal grand jury is probing the financially troubled West Fresno School District. The grand jury subpoenaed documents earlier this month about funds that were supposed to be spent to upgrade school technology, the Fresno Bee reported. The district received $6.5 million over three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The state superintendent of public instruction has ordered an investigation of an East Palo Alto school district's finances. The superintendent of the Ravenswood City School District, Charlie Mae Knight, is already facing 19 felony conflict-of-interest charges. Prosecutors say Knight stood to benefit when the school district gave loans to employees who rented housing from her or who owed her money.
NEWS
June 6, 2000 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After failed negotiations between California school districts and the Davis administration, a state commission voted Monday to begin reimbursing schools for about $1 billion in special education costs. The money was spent by districts over the past 20 years to cover aspects of the program required by the state, ranging from smaller caseloads for speech therapists to a longer school year. The state has contended that budget appropriations have covered the costs.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John W. Stallings, an educator and administrator who was an expert on school finance, has died of Parkinson's disease. He was 76. Stallings, a USC professor for more than a quarter of a century, died Feb. 25 at Corona Regional Medical Center in Corona. By the time Stallings joined USC's Rossier School of Education in 1969, he was well-rooted in the practical problems of the public schools that would seek his advice.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | ALEX MURASHKO and MEGAN GARVEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From nearly $10 million to improve a small Anaheim school district to the fate of a Wal-Mart proposed for closed school grounds in Huntington Beach, several local initiatives were still being decided late Tuesday after large numbers of Orange County voters went to the polls. A $9.7-million bond measure to improve aging schools in Anaheim's Magnolia School District, which serves 6,500 kindergartners through sixth-graders, did well in early returns late Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
Everywoman's Village, a longtime community institution that had been battling for financial survival, recently closed its doors. The school, which opened in 1963 and became a model for women's education, was unable to raise enough money to continue offering classes, Executive Director Laura Selwyn said Saturday. Last summer, the school's board of directors announced it would close in November unless sufficient money could be raised to cover an $80,000 deficit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1991
The Times editorial "There Is No Substitute for a Good Teacher" (April 17) highlights one of the major dilemmas of our society and, by extension, elicits serious questions about our concerns, as a nation, as a state, as communities of families and individuals. Many of us crave the "quick fix," the convenient solution, the "bottom line." We give lip service to noble assertions packaged in handsome panaceas for "public" consumption but, still, we are nagged by all these dysfunctions witnessed in our daily lives.
NEWS
October 22, 1999
Retired California Supreme Court Associate Justice Raymond L. Sullivan, who wrote the landmark 1974 decision that removed school financing from local property taxes, died at his home in San Francisco. He was 92. Sullivan, who was known for his eloquently written decisions and his impeccable scholarship, was appointed to the state Supreme Court in 1966 by Gov. Jerry Brown. He served on the court nine years. Sullivan then taught at Hastings College of Law until his retirement in 1993.
SPORTS
November 16, 1997 | DUNCAN MANSFIELD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Peyton Manning means more than touchdowns to Tennessee. Much more. The senior quarterback's name routinely appears in sports pages across the country and is mentioned on virtually every college football show and in any analysis of the upcoming NFL draft. And when he is mentioned, so is the school. "The real value of Peyton Manning is in the sheer publicity that he generates," says George Korda, a Knoxville media and political analyst who's seen nothing like Manning before at the school.
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