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School For Peace

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NEWS
October 20, 1989 | DAVID LARSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"For most of them," Elias Eady said, "it was the first time they had ever been face to face with the other side." The "them" to which Eady referred are participants at a unique institution in the troubled Middle East--The School for Peace--where Jewish and Palestinian teen-agers meet, encounter-style, for three days for the simple purpose of discovering what is on each other's minds.
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NEWS
October 20, 1989 | DAVID LARSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"For most of them," Elias Eady said, "it was the first time they had ever been face to face with the other side." The "them" to which Eady referred are participants at a unique institution in the troubled Middle East--The School for Peace--where Jewish and Palestinian teen-agers meet, encounter-style, for three days for the simple purpose of discovering what is on each other's minds.
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NEWS
August 31, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clustered on a hilltop with a breathtaking view of the sparse Ayalon Valley, they have labored for nearly two decades in solitude. Arabs and Jews live together here in equal numbers, neighbors in 32 little stucco houses with riotous flower gardens. To show how it can be done, they share political power, send their children to the same grammar school, learn each other's language and run weekend encounters for Arab and Jewish high schoolers who trickle in from outside.
WORLD
September 25, 2007 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Neve Shalom, Israel The music blared in Arabic as a knot of women twirled slowly around the bride-to-be. Well-dressed onlookers, some in traditional Muslim head scarves, clapped and swayed. On this evening of celebration, the fireworks sizzled, sweets beckoned and jubilant guests congratulated the Arab bride's parents with a double kiss and hearty "Mazel tov!" Mazel tov? "It's very normal," said Nava Sonnenschein, one of the Jews clapping at the edge of the dance circle. "For here."
OPINION
June 27, 2004 | Marc B. Haefele, Marc B. Haefele, news editor of the Los Angeles Alternative Press, is heard on KPCC (89.3 FM) on Fridays.
Even Sheriff Lee Baca probably knows that Los Angeles County's jail system is failing. From October to April, inmates, including some key witnesses in murder cases, were being killed almost every month. The ratio of deputy guards to prisoners in the troubled Central Jail was an abysmal 1 to 45, according to the Sheriff's Department. Gang-member inmates now say, "We run the jails." Who could doubt them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2001 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battered little yellow school bus filled with notebooks, pens, paint and fruit bounced into Los Angeles looking for donations for a new indigenous school in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. At the wheel was Chris Farmer, a 29-year-old UC Berkeley graduate hoping to entice others to join him on his Zapatista mission that would take him from Santa Cruz to the jungles of Chiapas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1986 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
A Garden Grove teacher heard a speech three years ago. It inspired him to seek a way to teach schoolchildren about peace. On Tuesday, that teacher, Paul Portner, 34, saw what his dream had become on the grounds of the United Nations' headquarters in New York. Hundreds of New York City children and one of Portner's own pupils from Garden Grove took part in a "balloon-messages for peace" ceremony on the U.N. grounds. It was the first such outdoor public event in the U.N.'s history.
MAGAZINE
April 18, 1999 | PATT MORRISON
A visitor to london cannot fail to have a few blue-plaque moments, the serendipity of walking a street and seeing affixed to some building a small blue marker noting that it was here that Winston Churchill learned he had been elected prime minister, or here that Shelley wrote "Ode to the West Wind."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1990 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Tom Bussey glides and weaves on the glassy water by the Oceanside Pier, as he has done for 28 years, he pulls up his long surfboard and trudges to the office for a radical change of gear. With his graying hair and mustache, the tanned Bussey looks like another aging surfer clinging to an ever more distant youth of endlessly crashing waives, gleaming Corvettes and orange sunsets. Then he buckles on his stainless steel .357 magnum.
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