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School Integration

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE and ELAINE WOO, Times Staff Writers
The state was ordered Tuesday to pay up to $35 million to the Long Beach Unified School District for money spent on voluntary desegregation efforts from 1977 to 1984, a ruling that could affect dozens of school districts around California. The order by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert I. Weil followed more than five years of efforts by the Long Beach district to recover the expenses of its desegregation program, which began in 1972.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2013
Julius Chambers, a tenacious North Carolina civil rights lawyer whose house was bombed and office torched as a result of his advocacy, died Friday. The 76-year-old attorney, whose cases paved the way for public school integration in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg area, had been in failing health for several months, his law firm said. Over the years, his opponents also set his car ablaze, along with his father's general store and garage business, but Chambers, known for his unflappable nature, persisted.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1991
Jonathan Gaw's article "Integration Plan Draws Ire in Vista" (Jan. 11) attempted to explain what has become a snowballing problem in the Vista Unified School District for many years--the "ethnic imbalance" of Vista schools. This is not an issue of "rich people in north Vista wanting to keep Mexicans out of their neighborhoods," (as one parent said), and I truly resent that implication. If the new Mission Meadows elementary school had the radical imbalance that currently exists at Santa Fe/California school, I would still want my children to go to Mission Meadows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2013 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Tom Bartman, whose election to the Los Angeles Board of Education in 1980 gave board conservatives a majority for the first time in years and helped spell the end of mandatory school busing in the sprawling district, died Monday at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 67. The cause was cancer, said his wife, Eleanor. A Republican, Bartman served seven years on the school board, including two terms as its president, from 1981 to 1983. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 An attorney for the anti-busing group Bustop, Bartman was first elected to the seven-member board in February 1980, when he won a special election to fill a vacancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1991 | JOHN PENNER
Parents of Latino students at Oak View Elementary School are questioning whether a district desegregation plan will curtail bilingual programs and services aimed at helping students from low-income families. Some of the 150 parents who attended an Oak View community meeting for Spanish-speaking residents Thursday said they feared that integration might subject their children to racial discrimination by their Anglo schoolmates.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | United Press International
Sumner Elementary School, a focal point of the Supreme Court's landmark school desegregation decision in 1954, has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places, a federal historian said Thursday.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
Elnora Crowder liked to ease into her Saturdays after a week of teaching school. But on this particular day in 1963 she got up early and headed for Watts, a journey that would leave a lasting mark on the public schools of Los Angeles. When Crowder approached some teen-agers in a park, "They actually recoiled from me saying, 'Blacks go to a white school?' " she recalls. "It was like I was asking them to go to the moon."
NATIONAL
June 29, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
In a decision that may herald a new era in the long struggle over racial integration in public education, the Supreme Court declared Thursday that officials may not use race to assign children to schools, even if the goal is greater diversity. Neither white nor black students may be turned away from a particular school simply because of their race, the court said in a 5-4 decision.
NATIONAL
June 2, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court heads into the final month of its term next week, and is expected to deliver major decisions on the future of school integration, the role of corporate money in political campaign ads and a taxpayer challenge to President Bush's faith-based initiative. There will probably be more 5-4 rulings and sharply worded dissents as the justices hand down rulings in the 26 remaining cases by the end of June and then leave town for the summer. If new Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2012 | Sandy Banks
They aren't the kind of heroes usually honored during Black History Month. They didn't challenge Jim Crow laws or invent more ways to use peanuts. But they were pioneers 40 years ago in this city's first school integration campaign. Rudy Pittman, now a teacher, was 14 when he took that first bus ride from Watts, one of seven kids, escorted by police, headed over the hill to Van Nuys' Birmingham High. It was 1972 and the Los Angeles Unified School District had been found guilty of intentionally segregating city schools.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2013 | By Jenny Jarvie
Like many high school seniors about this time of year, Mareshia Rucker and Stephanie Sinnott ooh and aah over gowns with heart-shaped bodices and jewel-encrusted necklines. Yet the ritual of picking a prom dress is little more than an afterthought for these teens, amid all the pressure of organizing their county's first integrated prom. Rucker is black and Sinnott is white. More than 40 years after the Supreme Court ordered school integration, the two classmates are pushing one of south-central Georgia's slowest-moving counties to overturn a long-standing tradition of segregated proms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2012 | Sandy Banks
They aren't the kind of heroes usually honored during Black History Month. They didn't challenge Jim Crow laws or invent more ways to use peanuts. But they were pioneers 40 years ago in this city's first school integration campaign. Rudy Pittman, now a teacher, was 14 when he took that first bus ride from Watts, one of seven kids, escorted by police, headed over the hill to Van Nuys' Birmingham High. It was 1972 and the Los Angeles Unified School District had been found guilty of intentionally segregating city schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2011 | Sandy Banks
This is not going to be some rambling tome about the glory days of public education. It will be well-written, thorough yet concise, precise in language and even-toned. It had better be, because I'm writing about my high school English teacher, who will probably read this, red pen in hand. The fact that, 40 years after our last class, I still care what Mr. Telecky might think speaks volumes about my teachers' impact on me. I reunited with Stuart Telecky last weekend, thanks to the efforts of Lelia McBath, my high school math teacher, now a Los Angeles resident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2010 | Jean Merl
By the time Democratic Rep. Diane Watson announced Thursday that she would end her political career after more than three decades, word of her impending retirement had spread so widely that she joked about the anticlimactic nature of the news conference she held in her Wilshire Boulevard office. But Watson had at least one surprise up her sleeve -- she declined to endorse a candidate to succeed her, raising eyebrows among the many political observers who expected her to back state Assembly Speaker Karen Bass (D-Los Angeles)
NATIONAL
May 3, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A federal judge has ruled that the Galveston public school system is desegregated, ending a civil rights lawsuit that was initiated in 1959. U.S. District Judge Sim Lake of Houston issued the ruling Friday, saying the district's history of compliance with a 1969 desegregation plan showed that the schools had fully integrated. In 2007, the League of United Latin American Citizens filed a complaint over the closure of a school with a heavily Latino student body. Lake, who approved that school's closure, wrote in Friday's ruling that he found no segregation in faculty and staff assignments, pupil transportation, achievement or special programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2009 | Richard Fausset
Griffin B. Bell, a Southern judge who earned both enmity and praise during the civil rights era -- and later served as a reform-minded attorney general under President Carter -- died Monday morning at an Atlanta hospital. He was 90. Bell died of complications from pancreatic cancer, said Les Zuke, a spokesman for King & Spalding, the Atlanta-based law firm that Bell helped build into a national powerhouse. Bell will be best remembered for his life in government, first as a justice in the U.S.
NEWS
September 9, 1996 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World War II had just ended and the United States had established itself as a leader of freedom and democracy in the Western world--but not for everyone. Gonzalo Mendez and his three children were in the middle of a war at home for a simple freedom--the right for the children to attend school with other Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2013 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Tom Bartman, whose election to the Los Angeles Board of Education in 1980 gave board conservatives a majority for the first time in years and helped spell the end of mandatory school busing in the sprawling district, died Monday at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 67. The cause was cancer, said his wife, Eleanor. A Republican, Bartman served seven years on the school board, including two terms as its president, from 1981 to 1983. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 An attorney for the anti-busing group Bustop, Bartman was first elected to the seven-member board in February 1980, when he won a special election to fill a vacancy.
OPINION
September 16, 2007
The achievement gap between African American and Latino students and their white peers is stark and persistent. It has existed for decades, and it's growing more pronounced. The data refute what would be reassuring explanations. The gaps in reading and math test scores are not due to income disparities, nor are they attributable to parents' educational levels. The simple fact is that most black and brown children do not do as well in school as most whites.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
In a decision that may herald a new era in the long struggle over racial integration in public education, the Supreme Court declared Thursday that officials may not use race to assign children to schools, even if the goal is greater diversity. Neither white nor black students may be turned away from a particular school simply because of their race, the court said in a 5-4 decision.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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