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School Integration

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1999 | PETER M. WARREN and KATE FOLMAR and JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
UC Irvine's cadaver program paid more than $15,000 over three years to companies that are now under scrutiny in a criminal investigation, according to financial records released Friday. The three companies are linked to Willed Body Program Director Christopher S. Brown, who was fired last month amid suspicions that he or associates profited from the program.
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NEWS
September 11, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A court decision that helped launch the contentious era of forced school busing was nullified Friday with a federal judge's ruling that the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school district in North Carolina had done all it could to end segregation. Although the ruling by U.S. District Judge Robert Potter is not the first to declare a district officially desegregated, the case has been closely watched around the country because of what it symbolizes: the potential close of a chapter in American history.
NEWS
April 19, 1999 | From Reuters
A lawsuit filed for a white first-grader threatens school desegregation policies in Charlotte, N.C., where a landmark ruling 30 years ago cleared the way for busing to integrate public schools nationwide. The federal trial, set to open here today, is the latest attack on racial quotas and busing plans drawn up since the late 1960s by local school boards to end segregation.
NEWS
February 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
Chinese American parents challenging racially based admissions in San Francisco's school desegregation program reached a tentative settlement with the school district and the NAACP on Tuesday, the day their suit was to go to trial. U.S. District Judge William Orrick ordered details kept confidential until a hearing today on preliminary approval of the settlement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1999
A federal lawsuit's allegations that the Pasadena school district's lottery system for entry to its three best schools is based on race has no foundation, district officials said Friday. Supt. Vera Vignes and school board President Lisa Fowler said the Pasadena Unified School District will give immediate entry to siblings of those already at the schools, but beyond that, the selection will be entirely random.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1999 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A group of parents sued the Pasadena Unified School District on Monday in an attempt to dismantle a new lottery system that uses ethnicity to help determine which children are admitted to some of the district's best schools. In the federal lawsuit, five Pasadena-area parents are alleging that the school district's consideration of ethnic origin in admissions to three schools violates federal law requiring equal treatment regardless of race.
NEWS
November 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
They circled the Wal-Mart shipping trailers Friday for President Clinton's homecoming--his first post-election trip beyond Washington's Beltway. "This is where I started," he reflected. The president flew to Arkansas, where he attended an airport dedication, after stoking more home state memories in a White House ceremony with the "Little Rock Nine"--the black students who integrated Central High School in 1957.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Felicitas Mendez died this week secure in the knowledge that the accomplishments of her family, who led a landmark fight to integrate Orange County schools, finally had been recognized. Mendez and her husband, Gonzalo, sued the Westminster School District in 1945 when their children were barred from attending school with white children and were ordered instead to enroll in a school for Mexican Americans.
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court sidestepped a dispute Tuesday over whether Mississippi has done enough to desegregate state-supported colleges and universities--an issue the Justice Department said the court may need to reconsider. The justices turned down an appeal by black residents who say a revised college-admission plan and a long-standing funding formula have left in place remnants of the old segregated system.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four decades after their bid to enter an all-white school sparked the most volatile state-federal conflict since the Civil War, nine middle-aged black men and women scaled the steps of Little Rock Central High once again Thursday. But unlike the day in 1957 when the "Little Rock Nine" were greeted by a hostile, spitting mob outside the school, the mayor, governor--and president of the United States--showed up to welcome them as heroes.
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