Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSchool Lunch
IN THE NEWS

School Lunch

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The American school lunch, long the butt of schoolyard jokes, is in for a nutritional makeover, fueled by concern over a national epidemic of childhood obesity and funded by the first hike in federal contributions in three decades. Starting next school year, U.S. schoolchildren will see changes in school lunch programs that are expected to bring fruits and vegetables, more whole grains and potentially smaller portions to every meal served in...
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
No one should have expected that putting more vegetables in front of elementary school students would instantly turn them into an army of broccoli fans. Plenty of food has been thrown out since new federal rules took effect in 2011 requiring students in the subsidized school lunch program to choose a fruit or vegetable each day. Nevertheless, studies find that continued exposure to produce is resulting in more children eating at least some of it. That's worth a certain amount of wasted food.
Advertisement
WORLD
July 17, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Indian authorities on Wednesday were trying to determine how food served as part of a free school lunch program got tainted with insecticide, leading to the deaths of at least 22 children and the hospitalization of more than two dozen others. The children, who were between the ages of 5 and 12, attended a school in a small village in the eastern state of Bihar. After eating a lunch of potatoes, soybeans, rice and lentils on Tuesday, they began complaining of severe stomach pain and were vomiting, authorities said.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Karin Klein
Congress and the U.S. Department of Agriculture should have consulted some everyday, health-conscious moms and dads before they drew up their amazingly byzantine rules for school lunches. I'm all in favor of the new policy's aim to put more fruits and vegetables in front of school kids, especially those who are poor enough to qualify for subsidized school meals. Even if that means a few veggies get tossed in the trash. Most parents know that children, especially those more used to Pringles than parsnips, do a lot of refusing before they develop a taste for vegetables.
NATIONAL
August 26, 2009 | Mary MacVean
When Michelle Obama and her fifth-grade partners harvested lettuce and peas in the White House garden this spring, she made a point of saying that American children are "not eating right and not moving their bodies at all," and she cited what they eat in school as part of the problem. On just about every schoolyard, the nation's obesity problem is apparent: A fifth of U.S. children are overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nutrition advocates said the first lady's comments gave them increased hope that Congress would bolster the school lunch program when it takes up renewing the Child Nutrition Act, which expires Sept.
WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - The principal at an Indian elementary school where 23 children died last week after eating free lunches contaminated with pesticide was arrested Wednesday on murder and criminal conspiracy charges after eight days on the run. Principal Meena Devi, 35, was caught in Chhapra, the city where the tragedy occurred in India's impoverished northern state of Bihar. On July 16, about 50 children - most younger than 10 - attending Dharmasati Gandaman Primary School complained of feeling sick after eating their lunch, which was provided free under a national government program that feeds an estimated 120 million children.
FOOD
September 16, 1993 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Washington was consumed last week with the nuts and bolts of the Clinton Administration's plan to shrink the government gravy train, another announcement about a federal meat-and-potatoes issue went mostly overlooked. Specifically, there will be less meat and more potatoes in the nation's school lunches if U.S. Department of Agriculture officials can enact their proposed reforms in the $4-billion program. Under its "Fresh Start" initiative, USDA will double the 8.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Karin Klein
Congress and the U.S. Department of Agriculture should have consulted some everyday, health-conscious moms and dads before they drew up their amazingly byzantine rules for school lunches. I'm all in favor of the new policy's aim to put more fruits and vegetables in front of school kids, especially those who are poor enough to qualify for subsidized school meals. Even if that means a few veggies get tossed in the trash. Most parents know that children, especially those more used to Pringles than parsnips, do a lot of refusing before they develop a taste for vegetables.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1993
President Harry S. Truman started the federally subsidized school lunch program in 1946. Those meals reduced hunger in America. Now the Clinton Administration wisely has embarked on a mission to cut some of the fat out of school lunches. Nearly 25 million children eat lunch at school. Most get an unnecessary extra helping of fat from menus that feature such favorites as hamburgers, fried chicken, french fries and pizza.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services and
America's schoolchildren will eat healthier lunches if schools lock up the candy and soda machines and put more fruits and vegetables--and fewer fatty foods--on the cafeteria menu, a panel of experts said today. The unofficial Citizens Commission on School Nutrition also urged a sharp increase in funding for the school lunch program, which feeds about 24 million children a day.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2013 | By David Pierson
Fourteen bipartisan members of the House of Representatives urged lawmakers Wednesday to block Chinese poultry from school lunches and other national nutrition programs because of the country's poor food safety record. In a letter , the 12 Democratic representatives and two Republicans called for language in the 2014 agriculture appropriations bill to ensure chicken processed in China is not included in the national school lunch program, the school breakfast program, the child and adult care food program and the summer food service program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | By Richard Winton
A former Rialto school district accountant accused of embezzling $1.8 million in schools' lunch money after being seen on video stuffing cash in her bra pleaded not guilty Wednesday to 16 felonies. After entering the not guilty pleas, Judith Oakes, 48, was held in lieu of $1.8-million bail by a San Bernardino County Superior Court judge Oakes could serve up to 11 years in prison if convicted of all the charges in what Rialto police say is the largest white-collar crime case they have ever handled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | By Richard Winton
Prosecutors allege that a former Rialto school district accountant charged with embezzling $1.8 million stole more than $4,200 a week for eight years. Judith Oakes, 48, faces 16 felony counts and the prospect of up to 11 years in prison if convicted of all the charges in what Rialto police say is the largest white-collar crime case they have ever handled. Oakes, who was allegedly caught on video stuffing school lunch money into her bra, was charged Tuesday. As nutrient services accountant, Oakes oversaw the lunch money collected from the district's 29 schools, along with related state and federal funds.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Cookie Monster was in the house! Everyone's favorite furry blue cookie lover stopped by our own Test Kitchen this morning to talk cookies (of course), fill us in on his new " Sesame Street " segment, and teach us a little about -- of all things -- self-control. "Sesame Street" begins its 44th season today, and Cookie Monster, one of its longtime stars, has appeared on the PBS children's program since its premiere in 1969. This season, Cookie Monster is starring in a new recurring feature called "Cookie's Crumby Pictures.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
The start of school carries extra anxiety for the parents of kids who have celiac disease or an intolerance for gluten. Packing lunch can be a challenge, as can getting everyone educated about what foods could cause problems. Packing lunch “is almost a topic of obsession for me,” says Lucy Gibney, whose 9-year-old son cannot eat wheat or dairy products. Especially for parents who are sending children to school for the first time, the cafeteria can seem like a minefield of problems.
WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - The principal at an Indian elementary school where 23 children died last week after eating free lunches contaminated with pesticide was arrested Wednesday on murder and criminal conspiracy charges after eight days on the run. Principal Meena Devi, 35, was caught in Chhapra, the city where the tragedy occurred in India's impoverished northern state of Bihar. On July 16, about 50 children - most younger than 10 - attending Dharmasati Gandaman Primary School complained of feeling sick after eating their lunch, which was provided free under a national government program that feeds an estimated 120 million children.
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Meals containing less fat and more fruits and vegetables will be on school lunch menus this fall under new government dietary rules. Congress voted in 1994 to require school meals to reflect the government's dietary guidelines but allowed two years for preparations. Most school districts, perhaps 80%, will try to meet the new regulations this fall, according to informal assessments.
FOOD
June 9, 1994 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-awaited federal proposal on reforming government-subsidized school lunches was criticized on several fronts even before its formal release Wednesday in Washington. The plan, which was hailed as a major reform by U.S. Department of Agriculture officials, actually did not address some of the most controversial aspects of food service in the nation's elementary and secondary schools.
WORLD
July 17, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Indian authorities on Wednesday were trying to determine how food served as part of a free school lunch program got tainted with insecticide, leading to the deaths of at least 22 children and the hospitalization of more than two dozen others. The children, who were between the ages of 5 and 12, attended a school in a small village in the eastern state of Bihar. After eating a lunch of potatoes, soybeans, rice and lentils on Tuesday, they began complaining of severe stomach pain and were vomiting, authorities said.
OPINION
June 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Many factors are relevant in determining how much the state should spend to provide a child with an "adequate" public education, but this is not one of them: whether the child lives in an area that was largely agricultural during the early 1970s. Yet agricultural zoning is, to this day, a significant component in the stupefyingly complicated formula that determines California's per-pupil funding. Everyone knows the formula is a mess, but for decades the Legislature did nothing to change it. Now, taking advantage of an unusual moment in state budget history, Gov. Jerry Brown has sliced through the paralysis and reached a compromise with legislators to create an immeasurably more sensible, comprehensible and fair formula for funding schools.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|