Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSchool Lunch Programs
IN THE NEWS

School Lunch Programs

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1990 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Mark Stevens, principal at Santa Paula's Mupu Elementary School, lunch duty begins before 7 a.m. That's when Stevens, who is also a teacher and a crossing guard at the 100-student school, leaves his house in Ojai for nearby Nordhoff High School, picks up 15 to 20 brown-bag lunches and delivers them at Mupu before classes begin. Stevens' duty as lunch deliveryman began this year, after Mupu's kitchen was closed last year due to budget cuts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
When the National School Lunch Program began in 1946, the idea was to get nutritious food into the stomachs of malnourished children from low-income families. Ironic, then, that these days the school lunch program is being scrutinized for its role in contributing to the growing problem of childhood obesity in America. The latest report was published online this week by the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. It concludes that girls who participate in the National School Lunch Program gain weight at a faster clip than other girls from low-income families who do not get the subsidized lunches (and sometimes breakfasts)
Advertisement
NEWS
August 8, 1988
Two government employees were charged in San Juan, Puerto Rico, with embezzling thousands of dollars from school lunch programs by allegedly reporting food had spoiled and then selling it to private firms. Justice Department officials said the charges, filed after a two-year investigation, involve hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of food that was marked as rotten and then sold to wholesalers and stores instead of destroying it, the San Juan Star reported.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Senate approved a sweeping boost to school nutrition programs Thursday, adding $4.5 billion to bring more meals and healthier nutrition standards to low-income children nationwide. The legislation, approved without a vote under a bipartisan strategy that sponsors hoped could be swiftly replicated in the House, was designed to give added help to jobless and low-income parents at a time when the economy continues to lag and a new school year is about to start. The bill would continue existing school nutrition programs that expire at the end of the federal fiscal year Sept.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1997 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
School cafeterias have rarely been havens of innovation, unless you count discovering new ways to disguise leftover meatloaf. But the computer revolution is so pervasive that even cafeterias can't escape. More and more districts are using computer networks to manage their school lunch programs, arrange menus and even calculate nutritional content of meals. One of the companies that provides such systems, Panda, was sold last week by Alpha Microsystems of Santa Ana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1998
The city of Lawndale will serve free meals to youths under the age of 18 in area parks through its Summer Food Service Program. The program would pick up where school lunch programs left off in June, said Alicia Thomason, community services supervisor for the city. "It's a service to the community," she said. "We wanted to offer kids a nutritious lunch free of charge because they used to get free lunches at school. It's also a way to get them into the parks and involved with park activities."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN
The U.S. secretary of agriculture on Monday called a House Republican proposal to transfer responsibility for school lunch programs to states a "wrong-headed measure" and "a very stupid idea." "Block granting these programs will mean the end of a national commitment to school lunch and school nutrition programs," Dan Glickman told more than 1,000 school food service directors who have gathered in Anaheim for a national conference. "It will not necessarily happen overnight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2001
Re "Back in the Wild, Condors Succumb to Old Nemesis: Lead," June 10: Banning the use of lead bullets on public lands can help save not only endangered condors but people and the environment. Spent bullets from recreational shooting are one of the major sources of lead pollution in the United States. A typical outdoor shooting range can become contaminated to Superfund levels after just a few years' use. Despite the costly problems of cleaning up abandoned sites, protecting nearby water from lead contamination and treating lead-poisoned kids, many cities, counties, parks districts and other jurisdictions throughout California maintain shooting ranges, at least in part with public funds.
NEWS
August 31, 1989 | From Associated Press
School lunch cooks are hampered in efforts to provide nutritious meals because the government donates mainly "fat-laden foods" such as ground beef, pork and processed luncheon meats, a consumer health group said Wednesday. Ellen Haas, director of the Public Voice for Food and Health Policy, criticized the Agriculture Department, which administers the National School Lunch Program, for "not providing the critical leadership necessary to speed progress in reducing fat in school lunches."
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | From The Washington Post
The Bush administration has proposed reversing a federal policy that required ground beef used in government school lunch programs to be tested to ensure it is free of salmonella, officials said Wednesday. The Agriculture Department is moving to change the Clinton administration policy after concluding that less costly and more effective alternatives for protecting meat safety could be as effective.
NATIONAL
October 20, 2009 | Mary MacVean
Children would get fewer French fries and more dark green vegetables in school cafeterias under recommendations being issued Tuesday by an Institute of Medicine panel. In addition, for the first time in the National School Lunch Program, the committee called for calorie limits on meals in an effort to curb obesity. The lunch recommendations allot 650 calories for students in kindergarten through fifth grade, 700 calories in sixth to eighth grade, and 850 calories in high school.
FOOD
August 19, 2009 | Mary MacVean; Betty Hallock; Krista Simmons
Whole Foods is partnering with "Renegade Lunch Lady" Ann Cooper, who helped reform Berkeley's school food program, to help other schools improve what they serve to the 30 million children who eat school lunches in the U.S. Whole Foods Market Co-President Walter Robb and Cooper are going to Washington to try to persuade lawmakers to improve federal school breakfast and lunch programs in the Child Nutrition Act, which is up for review by Congress....
NATIONAL
November 17, 2007 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
A drive to revamp the nation's costly farm subsidies died Friday in the Senate, leaving in place a system widely criticized for being out of step with the modern agriculture economy, for favoring crops with minimal nutritional value and for funneling large federal payouts to wealthy investors.
SCIENCE
January 13, 2005 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
Americans should cut their salt intake to about a teaspoon a day, keep their intake of trans fats "as low as possible," limit added sugars and eat 4 1/2 cups of fruits and vegetables a day, according to the new national dietary guidelines unveiled Wednesday. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, short pieces of pithy advice accompanied by several dozen pages of explanatory text, must be revamped every five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2003 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
Eric Bost could have chosen any school in the country to kick off National School Lunch Week. But the undersecretary for food and nutrition services for the U.S. Department of Agriculture wanted youngsters at E.P. Foster Elementary School in Ventura to know their campus was something special. Touting the school's farm-fresh salad bar and classroom lessons on food and diet, Bost promoted E.P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2001
Re "Back in the Wild, Condors Succumb to Old Nemesis: Lead," June 10: Banning the use of lead bullets on public lands can help save not only endangered condors but people and the environment. Spent bullets from recreational shooting are one of the major sources of lead pollution in the United States. A typical outdoor shooting range can become contaminated to Superfund levels after just a few years' use. Despite the costly problems of cleaning up abandoned sites, protecting nearby water from lead contamination and treating lead-poisoned kids, many cities, counties, parks districts and other jurisdictions throughout California maintain shooting ranges, at least in part with public funds.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Some people, mostly people who ate at school, say good cafeteria food is a contradiction in terms, like military music or jumbo shrimp. Not Rick De Burgh, director of food services for the Glendale Unified School District. "I'm very pleased with the meals we serve," said De Burgh, 44, whose cafeteria program is rated A+ by both the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the California Department of Education. Nonetheless, De Burgh is realistic about school food.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dwindling stockpiles of surplus food are creating severe shortages in school food programs throughout the country, causing school districts to raise prices and students to drop out of lunch programs in large numbers, educators and government officials say. While schools are being pressured to improve student nutrition, many are losing large chunks of their cafeteria budgets because federal surpluses of cheese, powdered milk, beef and other commodities have dried up.
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | From The Washington Post
The Bush administration has proposed reversing a federal policy that required ground beef used in government school lunch programs to be tested to ensure it is free of salmonella, officials said Wednesday. The Agriculture Department is moving to change the Clinton administration policy after concluding that less costly and more effective alternatives for protecting meat safety could be as effective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1998
The city of Lawndale will serve free meals to youths under the age of 18 in area parks through its Summer Food Service Program. The program would pick up where school lunch programs left off in June, said Alicia Thomason, community services supervisor for the city. "It's a service to the community," she said. "We wanted to offer kids a nutritious lunch free of charge because they used to get free lunches at school. It's also a way to get them into the parks and involved with park activities."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|