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NATIONAL
December 16, 2012 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The massacre of 26 children and adults at a school in western Connecticut may break the logjam in Congress on long-stalled gun-control legislation, although some longtime opponents said they plan to fight any new measures, lawmakers and analysts said Sunday. “I think we could be at a tipping point can get something done,” Sen. Chuck E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said on CBS's "Face the Nation," noting that there had been several mass shootings this year alone. “The public will not accept as a new normal one of these incidents every month” Schumer called for restoring the ban on assault-style weapons, limiting the number of bullets in ammunition clips and making it harder for “mentally unstable” individuals to obtain firearms.
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NATIONAL
December 4, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - "Newtown 911, what's the location of your emergency?" The voice on the other end shook with fear. "Sandy Hook school," the woman said. "I think there's somebody shooting in here. " It was the first call received by police in Newtown, Conn., the morning of Dec. 14 after Adam Lanza had shot his way into the elementary school and begun rampaging down the corridors and into classrooms. When he was done, 20 first-graders and six school employees lay dead. Lanza, 20, who had shot his mother, Nancy, to death in their Newtown home, then killed himself.
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NATIONAL
December 15, 2012 | By Tina Susman
NEWTOWN, Conn. -- All of the people killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School died from multiple wounds from a long gun and are classified as homicide victims, the state's chief medical examiner said Saturday. At a news conference, Dr. H. Wayne Carver II described the postmortems on the 20 children and six adults killed in Friday's attack. “I've been at this a third of a century and my sensibilities may not be the same as the average man,” Carver told reporters, “but this is probably the worst I have ever seen, the worst that I know any of my colleagues having seen.” Officials distributed a list of all of the victims to reporters and were preparing to release the bodies to the families for burial.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEWTOWN, Conn. - The firehouse is still there, just as it was on the day of the shooting, except for the 26 bronze stars adorning its roof: one for each victim of the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre. The school is still there too, a short walk up the road, but not for long. This week, gates guarding one of the nation's most notorious crime scenes quietly swung open to heavy machinery and construction trucks as work began to demolish the campus where 20 first-graders and six school employees died Dec. 14. Rarely has a major tear-down been conducted in such a hushed manner, but rarely has a project been steeped in such tragedy and debated in the midst of a town in mourning, in full view of those hit hardest.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2012 | By Tina Susman and Michael Muskal
NEWTOWN, Conn. -- Two more of the children killed by a gunman who invaded a Connecticut elementary school were buried on Tuesday as officials released new details of the deadly spree that has reshaped the debate over gun control. The National Rifle Assn., which has been under pressure to comment on the Newtown shootings, broke its silence and issued a statement saying it was ready to offer its plans at a Friday news conference. “We were shocked, saddened and heartbroken by the news of the horrific and senseless murders in Newtown,” said the pro-gun rights lobbying group, which has repeatedly fought gun-control legislation on the national, state and local levels.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several American newspapers and television networks called this week's mass killing in Littleton, Colo., "the worst U.S. school massacre." The people of Bath, Mich., a small farming town just outside Lansing, know differently. On the sun-drenched morning of May 18, 1927, 45 people--including 38 children--where killed when an embittered school board official set off a series of bombs inside the town's three-story brick schoolhouse. That horrific attack has been called the bloodiest ever on a U.S.
NEWS
April 20, 2002 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was always his dream to be a small-town sheriff in the California mountains. Instead, John Stone became sheriff of Colorado's largest county. And four months into the job, he was leading the investigation of a national tragedy: the deadly shooting at Columbine High School. Since then, Stone has been called incompetent and pathetic. He's been given the nickname "Sheriff Stonewall." And the credibility of his investigation into the massacre has been questioned.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2013 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
NEWTOWN, Conn. - Hours after a gunman killed 20 first-graders and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Lee Shull sent an email to friends and neighbors in Newtown and urged them to join him in doing something to prevent another mass shooting. "I knew we had to act.... We needed to do something," said Shull, whose two children attended Sandy Hook, where a killer with an assault weapon opened fire on the morning of Dec. 14. But the answer to exactly what that "something" should be remains elusive even in this town hit so hard by gun violence, as was evident Monday when the group that Shull helped create formally announced itself without taking a stand on new gun laws.
NEWS
July 3, 2005 | Mike Eckel, Associated Press Writer
Grief and graveside visits share time with hunger strikes and political organization. Beslan's raw emotions have given way to steely-eyed purpose since September's school massacre. At the vanguard is a committee of mostly women who lost children and grandchildren. They are demanding answers from a government they think has failed them. Founded in anguish as Middle School No.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Four teenagers accused of plotting to kill teachers and students in a lunch period massacre at Winslow Township High School were charged in Camden under a terrorism law created after the Sept. 11 attacks. The boys, ages 14 to 16, were arrested after police heard about the alleged plot from administrators at the school, where three of the teens are students. Their names were not released because of their ages. A family court judge ordered the four youths held for psychiatric evaluations.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2013 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - New York became the first state since the Newtown, Conn., school massacre to tighten gun laws, passing a wide-ranging bill Tuesday cracking down on assault weapons and ammunition that lawmakers say should set an example for Washington as it tackles the issue on the national level. The Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act, or SAFE Act, gives New York the toughest gun laws in the nation and touches on the mental health issues that both pro-gun and anti-gun activists say should be part of any new legislation.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2013 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
NEWTOWN, Conn. - Hours after a gunman killed 20 first-graders and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Lee Shull sent an email to friends and neighbors in Newtown and urged them to join him in doing something to prevent another mass shooting. "I knew we had to act.... We needed to do something," said Shull, whose two children attended Sandy Hook, where a killer with an assault weapon opened fire on the morning of Dec. 14. But the answer to exactly what that "something" should be remains elusive even in this town hit so hard by gun violence, as was evident Monday when the group that Shull helped create formally announced itself without taking a stand on new gun laws.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WARRENTON, Va. - Late on a weekday morning, Clark Brothers Guns is busy, busier than normal. The small parking lot is full, and the crack of gunfire from the outdoor shooting range behind the store cuts through the whoosh of traffic out front. A life-sized statue of a brown bear looms over the front doors, dressed in a red and white Santa suit. Inside, past a wall of gun safes, the store is stacked with guns and ammunition and its ceiling is papered with target silhouettes, including one that resembles Osama bin Laden.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Elizabeth Guzman will never forget the day last year when she came home from work to find her 25-year-old stepson, Bobby, holding a knife. In a threatening voice, he asked her, "Where are you from?" "I broke out in a sweat," she said. "I thought, 'I'm alone in the house. If anything happens, no one will know.'" Guzman tricked him into putting the knife down by handing him two chocolate chip cookies, one for each hand. But she fears it's only a matter of time until it happens again.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2012 | By Tina Susman and Michael Muskal
NEWTOWN, Conn. -- Two more of the children killed by a gunman who invaded a Connecticut elementary school were buried on Tuesday as officials released new details of the deadly spree that has reshaped the debate over gun control. The National Rifle Assn., which has been under pressure to comment on the Newtown shootings, broke its silence and issued a statement saying it was ready to offer its plans at a Friday news conference. “We were shocked, saddened and heartbroken by the news of the horrific and senseless murders in Newtown,” said the pro-gun rights lobbying group, which has repeatedly fought gun-control legislation on the national, state and local levels.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Brian Bennett and Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
NEWTOWN, Conn. - Before a town devastated by a rampage against its children, and a nation wondering how it could happen again, President Obama vowed to use the power of his office to prevent such calamities and fulfill what he called America's foremost obligation. "Can we honestly say that we're doing enough to keep our children, all of them, safe from harm?" Obama asked. "I have been reflecting on this in the past few days, and if we are honest with ourselves, the answer is no. We are not doing enough and we will have to change.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEWTOWN, Conn. - The firehouse is still there, just as it was on the day of the shooting, except for the 26 bronze stars adorning its roof: one for each victim of the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre. The school is still there too, a short walk up the road, but not for long. This week, gates guarding one of the nation's most notorious crime scenes quietly swung open to heavy machinery and construction trucks as work began to demolish the campus where 20 first-graders and six school employees died Dec. 14. Rarely has a major tear-down been conducted in such a hushed manner, but rarely has a project been steeped in such tragedy and debated in the midst of a town in mourning, in full view of those hit hardest.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON and ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The school locker, long feared as a repository of drugs and weapons, is making a comeback. Some administrators are returning the metal boxes to campus, figuring it's better than creating a generation of students with back problems. In one Orange County school district, a board member who watched a student wobble and fall over from the weight of her backpack has proposed reinstalling lockers in middle schools.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - As gun control advocates cheered President Obama's call to action on gun violence, the White House began to weigh its options Monday on how to fulfill the president's vow to use all the power of his office to prevent future mass killings. The most likely initiatives following Friday's Connecticut school shooting - efforts to tighten gun show sales, for example, or to reinstate a ban on assault weapons - are laden with political pitfalls and challenges. Although several members of Congress indicated they were newly open to gun control measures, opposition to stiffer gun laws is expected to remain firm, particularly in the Republican-led House.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2012 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The massacre of 26 children and adults at a school in western Connecticut may break the logjam in Congress on long-stalled gun-control legislation, although some longtime opponents said they plan to fight any new measures, lawmakers and analysts said Sunday. “I think we could be at a tipping point can get something done,” Sen. Chuck E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said on CBS's "Face the Nation," noting that there had been several mass shootings this year alone. “The public will not accept as a new normal one of these incidents every month” Schumer called for restoring the ban on assault-style weapons, limiting the number of bullets in ammunition clips and making it harder for “mentally unstable” individuals to obtain firearms.
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