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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1993
Students from low-income families might be eligible for free or reduced-price meals in the Garden Grove Unified School District. Only students whose families meet federal requirements based on family size and income are accepted by the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Program, said district spokesman Alan Trudell. For example, students in a family of four are eligible for free school meals if their family's yearly income is under $18,655.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Alicia Banks,
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. An illness that caused flu-like symptoms among roughly 20 students at an elementary school in Watts last week has spread to another school, sickening about 10 others, Los Angeles Unified officials said. At least eight students Monday at Dolores Huerta Elementary School in South Los Angeles reported symptoms that included upset stomach, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea around 12:50 p.m. That episode came after about 20 students at Ritter Elementary School in Watts also fell ill with flu-like symptoms on Friday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996
Students in the Anaheim Union High School and Anaheim City School districts may be eligible for free meals from the National School Breakfast and Lunch programs. Application forms are available at schools. Children are automatically eligible if their family receives food stamps, gets assistance from Aid to Families with Dependent Children or receives benefits from the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations. For other eligibility requirements, contact school or district officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2013 | By Melanie Mason and Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - Facing the prospect of a prolonged federal government shutdown, Gov. Jerry Brown will soon need to decide if the state will shoulder the cost to keep running federal programs used by millions of Californians. State officials say there's no guarantee that critical social services in California - such as food stamps, subsidized school meals and nutrition assistance for pregnant women and infants - could run without interruption in November. The Brown administration has not yet said if it plans to plug the gaps for social programs at the end of the month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1995 | IRA E. STOLL
Students in the Simi Valley public schools who may qualify for free or reduced-price lunches and breakfasts should apply now so the meals will be ready on the first day of school, school officials said. About 2,300 students in the district took advantage of the free or reduced-price lunches last year, and 400 ate breakfast at the schools, said Judy La Rossa, director of food services for the Simi Valley Unified School District.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting the stage for clashes between House and Senate Republicans, a Senate committee on Wednesday rejected House GOP plans to shift control of the school meals program to the states and cut other nutrition programs for children. The action emphasizes the reluctance of Senate Republicans to follow their House colleagues in transferring responsibility for social programs from the federal government to the states.
NEWS
September 3, 1992
The cost of most meals in the school cafeteria will be more expensive this year in the Long Beach Unified School District. For elementary school students, meals will increase 10 cents: breakfast from 50 to 60 cents, and lunch from 90 cents to $1. Middle and high school students will pay 75 cents for breakfast, an increase of 25 cents, and $1.50 for lunch, which had cost $1.25 to $1.75. District officials said that the price increase is the first in three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1995 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
A third more children than expected are taking advantage of a federally funded summer meals program for low-income families, administrators of the Newport-Mesa Unified School District said. Carolyn Stocker, the district's executive director of business and auxiliary operations, said that officials anticipated serving 550 meals a day, based on last year's total, but have been serving about 775 meals a day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1990 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State officials announced that they will audit the Compton Unified School District's program for feeding low-income children in an effort to determine if the district used inflated figures in applying for state and federal reimbursements for meals. State and federal inspectors who visited the district in December said the number of low-income meals reported at five schools may have been inflated as much as 52%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2008 | Mary MacVean, MacVean is a Times staff writer.
California may run out of money again this year to supplement school meals, in part because more struggling families are taking part in the free or reduced-price school lunch programs, the state's superintendent of public instruction said Tuesday.
WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - The principal at an Indian elementary school where 23 children died last week after eating free lunches contaminated with pesticide was arrested Wednesday on murder and criminal conspiracy charges after eight days on the run. Principal Meena Devi, 35, was caught in Chhapra, the city where the tragedy occurred in India's impoverished northern state of Bihar. On July 16, about 50 children - most younger than 10 - attending Dharmasati Gandaman Primary School complained of feeling sick after eating their lunch, which was provided free under a national government program that feeds an estimated 120 million children.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Ninety percent of Americans said schools should take a role in combating obesity -- a surprising cut away from the idea that being overweight is a personal choice. That doesn't meant people don't see that they need to take action as well for themselves and their families, according to the results of a Field Research poll released Wednesday. “It really indicates a sea change in how people view the problem,” Loel Solomon, vice president for community health at Kaiser Permanente, said in an interview.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
More than three-quarters of the nation's public elementary schools face no state or district limits on the sale of sugary drinks, candy or salty snacks, according to a survey. Children eat at least a third of their meals at school, and spend many waking hours there, the researchers noted in their study, published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Pediatrics. At a time when about a third of children are overweight or obese, the researchers noted, those laws and regulations that do exist are meant to reduce children's access to junk food.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Researchers have found an association between stricter school meal standards and the weight of students, especially those from low-income families. States that require more nutritious school lunches than the federal government mandated were compared with those that did not, looking at 4,870 eighth-graders in 40 states. And, the researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Pediatrics that students didn't compensate for the stricter standards by buying chips, cookies or other snacks elsewhere at school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Fatty corn dogs and sugary coffee cake may become extinct in thousands of school cafeterias nationwide under a landmark new alliance among Los Angeles Unified and five other major urban school districts to leverage their vast purchasing power for healthier fare and lower prices. School districts in L.A., New York, Chicago, Dallas, Miami and Orlando, Fla., plan to announce Thursday efforts to use their collective clout - 2.5 million daily meals served and $530 million annually spent - to make wholesome food a national standard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
At Mark Twain Middle School in Los Angeles, a blooming garden serves as a classroom. Students learn math by measuring the growth of wheat, ancient history by building a Mesopotamian-style irrigation system and the science of evaporation, evolution and genetics by watching their garden grow. At lunchtime, they may be found snacking on pasta tossed in a sauce featuring just-picked tomatoes and basil. Aiming to expand such links between classroom and cafeteria, the Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education voted this week to further strengthen what is regarded as one of the leading school nutrition programs in the nation.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state this week will begin auditing the Compton Unified School District's program for feeding low-income children in an effort to determine if the district used inflated figures in applying for state and federal reimbursements for meals. State and federal inspectors who visited the district in December said the number of low-income meals reported at five schools may have been inflated as much as 52%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
For every three California public school students who think school meals are yummier than usual, there's only one who thinks they're worse, according to a new poll released Wednesday. The survey by the California Endowment, the state's largest healthcare foundation, was the first to tally the attitudes of California students and parents since new national nutrition standards took effect in July. The changes by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, put into place partially to help curb childhood obesity, require schools to offer whole grains and low-fat milk and to cut back on sodium and saturated fat levels.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Anyone who's gone on a diet knows: It's easier to avoid potato chips if you don't have any. So it's not a surprise that researchers found that California high school students eat less fat and sugar and fewer calories at school than their peers in states that allow the sale of snacks with more of those items. What's more, the California students didn't compensate outside of school; they ate an average of 158 calories a day fewer than students in the other states, according to the study published Monday in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.The California students' consumption outside of school was approximately the same as the students in the other states.
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