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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1990
As a high school senior and editor of Santa Barbara High School's newspaper, the Forge, I was interested to read of the financial demise of numerous Los Angeles-area high school newspapers. The problems faced by these high school publications are disturbing and sad. As school districts across the state face the fact that budgets need to be reduced, high school papers are an easy target for cuts. Our school district is no exception, and as a result the Forge's staff and adviser have been forced to look in new directions for the money we need to print our paper.
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OPINION
December 22, 2010 | By Donna Myrow
Every Christmas, I think about Julie Smit. As a 16-year-old in 1994, Julia wrote a first-person article about her life for L.A. Youth, a nonprofit newspaper written by and for Los Angeles teenagers. It started like this: "As a couple of friends and I cruised down an alley to find a spot to kick back and smoke a joint, we saw a head with long blond hair pop up from a dumpster. In front of the dumpster was an old 10-speed that had been put together piece by piece. Every piece on the bike was a different color.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1992 | CAITLIN ROTHER
The Stinger, Camarillo High School's student newspaper, has earned the highest ranking among California high schools of its size in a national contest for school newspapers. The American Scholastic Press Assn. of College Point, N.Y., grouped the Stinger with seven other outstanding high school newspapers nationwide this year, each of which earned first place with special merit. The Stinger was chosen from more than 75 newspapers in its category, earning 980 out of 1,000 points possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
Darryl Adams was an advisor to the school newspaper at South East High School in South Gate when he refused the principal's request to cancel publication of a student-written editorial criticizing random searches on campus. He was removed from the post last year after the confrontation, lost his basketball coaching position and was prevented from continuing to announce football games at school. On Monday, the state Senate approved a measure inspired by Adams' story that prohibits an employee from being dismissed or otherwise retaliated against for acting to protect a student's speech in school newspapers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1988
I am an attorney in practice now for more than eight years and I am a member of the bar of the U.S. Supreme Court. I can understand the high court's rationale in holding that "educators do not offend the First Amendment by exercising editorial control" in school newspapers in certain circumstances. Nevertheless, I am morally offended by the hypocrisy of a school that, on the one hand, teaches constitutional rights, including free speech, and on the other hand, censors students' well-intentioned work product and limits their access to relevant and timely information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
Darryl Adams was an advisor to the school newspaper at South East High School in South Gate when he refused the principal's request to cancel publication of a student-written editorial criticizing random searches on campus. He was removed from the post last year after the confrontation, lost his basketball coaching position and was prevented from continuing to announce football games at school. On Monday, the state Senate approved a measure inspired by Adams' story that prohibits an employee from being dismissed or otherwise retaliated against for acting to protect a student's speech in school newspapers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1994
In response to "Ways Sought to Lead Poor Onto Information Highway," Jan. 11: One only needs to look at Val Verde Unified School District to see how it can be done. Val Verde School District, 15 miles south of Riverside, is composed of a very broad socioeconomic group. In five or six years we have gone from a handful of computers to almost 1,000 computers in the district. The article quoted MacWorld Magazine's Charles Piller, saying that the computer in the classroom should go to the teacher first, and that there should be sophisticated in-service training.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1991
I disagree with Bill Honig and the various school officials throughout California who oppose the use of Channel 1 in the public school system ("Who Controls TV," Oct. 13). Considering the dire straits their system's budgets have been in, they should welcome any additional teaching tools. Two or three minutes of commercials is a small price to pay to bring necessary supplemental current information to our students. Many teachers I have spoken with admit that textbooks cannot keep up with the fast-changing events of today's world.
NEWS
January 21, 1987 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to decide whether the Constitution's guarantee of freedom of the press extends to a high school newspaper. The case pits the right of students to report on subjects of interest to their readers--in this instance, on teen-age pregnancies and divorce by their parents--against the responsibility of school officials to control the curriculum.
OPINION
December 22, 2010 | By Donna Myrow
Every Christmas, I think about Julie Smit. As a 16-year-old in 1994, Julia wrote a first-person article about her life for L.A. Youth, a nonprofit newspaper written by and for Los Angeles teenagers. It started like this: "As a couple of friends and I cruised down an alley to find a spot to kick back and smoke a joint, we saw a head with long blond hair pop up from a dumpster. In front of the dumpster was an old 10-speed that had been put together piece by piece. Every piece on the bike was a different color.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2008 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Grover Cleveland High School Principal Bob Marks has his limits. On Thursday, it was the labeled diagram of a vagina splashed across the front page of the student newspaper's Valentine's Day issue. Flustered teachers rushed to confiscate the publication, but with some copies already in circulation and the Reseda campus in an uproar, it quickly became a hot read for the school's roughly 3,700 students. And some of the contraband issues made their way home, getting a quick reaction from parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2006 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
Carson High School pulled this month's school newspaper because of an anonymous article that likened rowdy black students at a nearby Taco Bell to "a pack of monkeys." The article, titled "Looks like the circus is in town," was on the editorial page of the issue distributed Tuesday, school officials said. The piece describes raucous and impolite behavior: "The one thing that I hate more than anything is standing in that line with dumb-ass people paying and acting a fool around me."
OPINION
June 26, 2003
Re "Students Assail School's Move to Kill Article," June 21: I am appalled that The Times would choose to further publish alleged details of a Venice High School teacher's background -- all of which are irrelevant to that teacher's job performance. The entire incident smacks of a vendetta arising from that teacher's tireless work to rid the school of soda and junk food. The teacher and her students endeavored to raise public awareness of health problems such as obesity, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, conditions that are at the very least exacerbated by poor dietary choices.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2002 | From Associated Press
School officials in a district where the policy allows students freedom of speech confiscated thousands of copies of the high school newspaper after learning it contained an article in which students talked about drinking alcohol at a party. Student editors said the article quoted the daughter of a school board member saying she had consumed alcohol, and they believe that was the reason about 4,500 copies of the biweekly Wooster Blade were seized Thursday. Supt.
NEWS
December 30, 2001 | PHIL ROONEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Register is recognized as one of the best high school newspapers in the nation, but it isn't receiving much praise from some school administrators, teachers and parents. Student reporters have been focusing on hard news, including student drug use, and just won their second straight "Best of Show" honor from the National Scholastic Press Assn. and the Journalism Education Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2001
Monica Lozano, president of the Spanish-language newspaper La Opinion, quit the State Board of Education this week, citing personal reasons. Gov. Gray Davis, who appointed Lozano in 1999 to a three-year term, could fill the vacancy at any time, said Greg Geeting, the board's interim deputy executive director. Lozano, the only Latino on the board, was sent off this week by other board members "with warm remarks and a round of applause," Geeting said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1989
The principal of Marshall Fundamental School in Pasadena has declared that all articles written for the school newspaper must be reviewed by him before they can be published. His decision has resulted in charges of censorship by students. The dispute began after publication of an article on the Pledge of Allegiance and another story criticized by Principal Joseph Caldera as being racially insensitive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2000 | ANNA GORMAN
The former editor of Camarillo High School's student newspaper has received an award for supporting free press rights of students, after he exposed censorship of a student publication at a neighboring school. Nick Edwards, who was the co-editor-in-chief of the Stinger, was this year's recipient of the Scholastic Press Freedom Award. Last spring, administrators at neighboring Rio Mesa High School prevented students from printing a story about teen pregnancy in their paper, the Spartan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1998 | LISA FERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Glue and scissors won't cut it anymore for many Ventura County school newspaper and yearbook editors. Students are turning to the computer--and complex software such as QuarkXPress, Adobe Photoshop and Pagemaker--to help them create better work--and to learn the latest tools of the publishing trade.
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