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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2008
Re "USC Acts by Popular Demand," by Randy Lewis, Oct. 22: Musicians Institute in Hollywood has been offering accredited bachelor's degrees in popular music performance since 1995. MI's bachelor of music in performance (contemporary styles) includes majors in guitar, bass, drums, keyboards and voice. The article raised questions about the potential for coexistence between popular music and higher education. We feel that these concerns were answered long ago by the countless MI students who have gone on to careers in every facet of contemporary music, including members of bands like Weezer, Nine Inch Nails and Red Hot Chili Peppers, artists like Keb' Mo' and Jeff Buckley, and musicians working with artists from Pink and Mariah Carey to Dwight Yoakam and John Doe. The marriage between pop music and higher education has proved to be happy and long-lasting, and we welcome USC to the field.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Comedic actor Jack Black and composer Andrew Lloyd Webber could soon have a bond. The seven-time Tony winner said he'd like to bring Black's comedy "School of Rock" to the stage. Lloyd Webber told CBC Radio that he was “very excited” about recently acquiring the rights to the 2003 film, which starred Black as a cash-strapped musician-turned-teacher who transforms a prep school class into a rock band. "There may be songs for me in it,” he said of the potential score, “but it's obviously got songs in it as it stands.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Comedic actor Jack Black and composer Andrew Lloyd Webber could soon have a bond. The seven-time Tony winner said he'd like to bring Black's comedy "School of Rock" to the stage. Lloyd Webber told CBC Radio that he was “very excited” about recently acquiring the rights to the 2003 film, which starred Black as a cash-strapped musician-turned-teacher who transforms a prep school class into a rock band. "There may be songs for me in it,” he said of the potential score, “but it's obviously got songs in it as it stands.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010 | By Melinda Newman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Roll over Beethoven. At the School of Rock, studying the classics means learning the Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop" and Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall," not "Moonlight Sonata. " On Nov. 13, the nationwide chain of music schools opened its 60th location, in West Los Angeles, to teach 7-to-18-year-olds how to jam on guitar, bass, drums, keyboards and vocals. The Wilshire Boulevard outlet is the second area location for the school, joining the 4-year-old School of Rock in North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2003 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
Inside a dim rehearsal studio off Sunset Boulevard, Jack Black is tuning the guitar that rests on his belly. Behind him, a spiky-haired drummer starts the beat. A mop-top guitar player does his imitation Pete Townsend windmill stroke. A button-nosed keyboardist curves his delicate fingers over the keys. And the bass player, cool and aloof, nods rhythmically as she picks at the strings. All eyes turn to Black, waiting, expecting ... something ... as if anything could happen at any moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010 | By Melinda Newman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Roll over Beethoven. At the School of Rock, studying the classics means learning the Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop" and Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall," not "Moonlight Sonata. " On Nov. 13, the nationwide chain of music schools opened its 60th location, in West Los Angeles, to teach 7-to-18-year-olds how to jam on guitar, bass, drums, keyboards and vocals. The Wilshire Boulevard outlet is the second area location for the school, joining the 4-year-old School of Rock in North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2003 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
"School of Rock" premiered at the head of the class this weekend with an estimated gross of $20.2 million for the music-themed comedy starring Jack Black, while "Out of Time," a noirish thriller with Denzel Washington in the lead, came in second with about $17 million. Although "School of Rock" fell short of Black's highest opening of $22.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | August Brown, Times Staff Writer
If you want to know the state of indie rock in 2007, watch Ben Gibbard perform on a college campus. The Death Cab for Cutie and the Postal Service frontman is arguably the genre's apotheosis right now. He's got impeccable aw-shucks pop smarts, a gold record with each of his major projects and is on the speed dial of practically every music supervisor in town.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | STEVE APPLEFORD
"Turn up the music, man. Turn it up!" The annoyance on Kid Frost's face looked real enough, even if the rapper's insistence on more volume was probably just hip-hop bravado. At least 1,500 students had scattered across UCLA's central plaza and pressed against a small outdoor stage in anticipation of the week's free noontime concert. Kid Frost was pacing aggressively across the stage in black sunglasses, as if waiting for the sound man to inch up the volume before starting the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | Dean Kuipers, Special to The Times
"If the devil had a voice, this would be it," remarked one of the younger fans out to see ex-Screaming Trees singer Mark Lanegan's set at the El Rey on Wednesday. It was an appropriate comment, considering that Lanegan sings about the devil. A lot. Old Scratch would be proud of that voice, a smoky, whiskey-etched baritone that first earned Lanegan accolades with the Trees' 1992 hit "Nearly Lost You" and which seems to have only increased in power in the intervening years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2008
Re "USC Acts by Popular Demand," by Randy Lewis, Oct. 22: Musicians Institute in Hollywood has been offering accredited bachelor's degrees in popular music performance since 1995. MI's bachelor of music in performance (contemporary styles) includes majors in guitar, bass, drums, keyboards and voice. The article raised questions about the potential for coexistence between popular music and higher education. We feel that these concerns were answered long ago by the countless MI students who have gone on to careers in every facet of contemporary music, including members of bands like Weezer, Nine Inch Nails and Red Hot Chili Peppers, artists like Keb' Mo' and Jeff Buckley, and musicians working with artists from Pink and Mariah Carey to Dwight Yoakam and John Doe. The marriage between pop music and higher education has proved to be happy and long-lasting, and we welcome USC to the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | August Brown, Times Staff Writer
If you want to know the state of indie rock in 2007, watch Ben Gibbard perform on a college campus. The Death Cab for Cutie and the Postal Service frontman is arguably the genre's apotheosis right now. He's got impeccable aw-shucks pop smarts, a gold record with each of his major projects and is on the speed dial of practically every music supervisor in town.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | Dean Kuipers, Special to The Times
"If the devil had a voice, this would be it," remarked one of the younger fans out to see ex-Screaming Trees singer Mark Lanegan's set at the El Rey on Wednesday. It was an appropriate comment, considering that Lanegan sings about the devil. A lot. Old Scratch would be proud of that voice, a smoky, whiskey-etched baritone that first earned Lanegan accolades with the Trees' 1992 hit "Nearly Lost You" and which seems to have only increased in power in the intervening years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2003 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
"School of Rock" premiered at the head of the class this weekend with an estimated gross of $20.2 million for the music-themed comedy starring Jack Black, while "Out of Time," a noirish thriller with Denzel Washington in the lead, came in second with about $17 million. Although "School of Rock" fell short of Black's highest opening of $22.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2003 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
Inside a dim rehearsal studio off Sunset Boulevard, Jack Black is tuning the guitar that rests on his belly. Behind him, a spiky-haired drummer starts the beat. A mop-top guitar player does his imitation Pete Townsend windmill stroke. A button-nosed keyboardist curves his delicate fingers over the keys. And the bass player, cool and aloof, nods rhythmically as she picks at the strings. All eyes turn to Black, waiting, expecting ... something ... as if anything could happen at any moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | STEVE APPLEFORD
"Turn up the music, man. Turn it up!" The annoyance on Kid Frost's face looked real enough, even if the rapper's insistence on more volume was probably just hip-hop bravado. At least 1,500 students had scattered across UCLA's central plaza and pressed against a small outdoor stage in anticipation of the week's free noontime concert. Kid Frost was pacing aggressively across the stage in black sunglasses, as if waiting for the sound man to inch up the volume before starting the show.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2011 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
A small-town boy from Washington state, Jason James Murphy has spent much of the last decade working his way up in the world of Hollywood movie casting. He's helped place actors, including children, on a variety of movies, from small independent films to last summer's science fiction hit "Super 8. " But few of the power players he encountered knew his secret: He is a registered sex offender who was convicted of kidnapping and molesting an 8-year-old boy in suburban Seattle 15 years ago. This week, J.J. Abrams, the director and co-producer of "Super 8," one of the most prized titles on Murphy's resume, found out. On Thursday, Los Angeles police began looking into whether Murphy was in compliance with state registration requirements for sex offenders.
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