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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
The new film "Won't Back Down" tells the story of a crusading single mother and a dedicated teacher who take on a bad principal, an unforgiving union and an entrenched bureaucracy in an attempt to improve a failing public elementary school. The real-life tale couldn't be more topical: The Chicago teachers strike brought public school reform to the forefront of the national conversation. But the film's relevance is proving problematic too. Pro-union, anti-charter school advocates began denouncing "Won't Back Down" weeks ahead of its Friday release, making the movie a target in ways its makers hadn't intended.
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OPINION
October 25, 2012
Re "Downtown charter a dream," Column, Oct. 23 South Park resident Mike McGalliard is quoted as saying of downtown elementary schools that their performance "has been frighteningly poor. " I've been reassured by McGalliard that his remarks were not directed at our charter school, and with good reason. With an Academic Performance Index score of 773, a statistic recently released by the state, the Para Los NiƱos Charter Elementary School posted a gain of 5% over last year and also significantly beat the goal established by the state.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1990
I am writing about your article on Oak Ridge Private School ("Noisy New Neighbor Shows Up on Block," Nov. 21). More exactly, I am writing about the duty inherent in the exercise of privilege. I would have hoped that the reporters, as professional journalists, would have taken the time to investigate the entire story rather than only one side. The obvious slant with which this story was written leads me to believe that the reporters were either sloppy in their research attempts or that they intentionally misrepresented facts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
The new film "Won't Back Down" tells the story of a crusading single mother and a dedicated teacher who take on a bad principal, an unforgiving union and an entrenched bureaucracy in an attempt to improve a failing public elementary school. The real-life tale couldn't be more topical: The Chicago teachers strike brought public school reform to the forefront of the national conversation. But the film's relevance is proving problematic too. Pro-union, anti-charter school advocates began denouncing "Won't Back Down" weeks ahead of its Friday release, making the movie a target in ways its makers hadn't intended.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012
Rachel Renee Russell is the bestselling author of the "Dork Diaries" series, which will continue in October with book No. 5, "Tales From a Not-So-Smart Miss Know-It-All. " We asked the lawyer-turned-writer what she's been reading. Her answer: "Merits of Mischief Book One: The Bad Apple," by T.R. Burns. Here's Russell's review: "Quiet and shy Seamus Hinkle is a normal 12-year-old just trying to survive middle school - until the unfortunate apple incident with his substitute teacher in the lunchroom.
BOOKS
August 11, 1996 | KAREN STABINER
It's a chicken-and-egg question: Do women buy more books than men because they grew up with better books to read than boys--or do girls get better books than boys because the female sex is inherently more interested in words? A friend with a 10-year-old son complains that there is little of value out there but that girls can choose from an array of titles. The New Girls by Beth Gutcheon, is a republication of a 1979 novel, a second cousin to the classic boys' prep school story, "A Separate Peace" and younger sister to Mary McCarthy's college-and-beyond coming-of-age story, "The Group."
NEWS
March 13, 1988
I feel I represent many active parents of children in California public schools when I say I was greatly disturbed after reading the article printed in the Westside section on March 3 concerning the public survey given about California public schools. The most damaging effect of the article was having it read by parents who are undecided as to whether they should investigate their neighborhood schools. Many parents of L.A. public schools try hard to make the schools the best possible place for our children.
NEWS
September 2, 1993
The Compton Citizen's Power Action Committee takes issue with your paper, The Los Angeles Times, and the obvious slant in an Aug. 5 article in the Long Beach section by Howard Blume, entitled "3 Emerge as Front-Runners for School Superintendent." The article includes information about the three candidates. However, two of the candidates have accolades and compliments offered as testimonies to their achievements and experiences. Both have others say "wonderful and glowing words" about them.
OPINION
June 11, 2007
Re "LAUSD, the school bully," Opinion, June 7 This article denigrates and patronizes the teachers of Los Angeles. By publishing only one side of a complex debate about the future of Locke High School, this article shows the animus toward teachers and their union. If those favoring the Green Dot charters were honestly committed to reform, they would have provided a forum for all of the concerned parties to debate converting Locke to a charter school before the teachers voted. If the teachers were not offered all of their choices and the ramifications of their votes from their union and their employer before they voted, the results would mean little.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1996
As a parent of a school-age child in the Oxnard School District, as well as an employee of the same district, I gasped in disbelief at the opening sentence of the article "Schools Demonstrate Internet Progress" March 30. Obviously, your reporter was able to see "kids with guns" outnumbering "kids with computers" in an environment so positive and constructive that anything but downright pride and satisfaction in our children would be totally out of...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012
Rachel Renee Russell is the bestselling author of the "Dork Diaries" series, which will continue in October with book No. 5, "Tales From a Not-So-Smart Miss Know-It-All. " We asked the lawyer-turned-writer what she's been reading. Her answer: "Merits of Mischief Book One: The Bad Apple," by T.R. Burns. Here's Russell's review: "Quiet and shy Seamus Hinkle is a normal 12-year-old just trying to survive middle school - until the unfortunate apple incident with his substitute teacher in the lunchroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Marc Olsen
At times it seems the simple ineptitude of "Beneath the Darkness" surely must mask some undercurrent of deeper sophistication and intention on behalf of the filmmakers. Alas, as it turns out, such things never surface. The film plays as an odd, distinctly unsuccessful pairing of the Southern Gothic thriller with a rather mundane high school story. A group of small-town Texas youngsters (including Aimee Teegarden from TV's "Friday Night Lights") become convinced something weird is up with the sad, strange widower who runs the local funeral parlor.
OPINION
June 8, 2011 | Tim Rutten
Equal access to a high-quality education may be the defining civil rights issue and economic challenge of our time. Year by year, the social and material distances that separate Americans from one another are growing at an accelerating rate. The wealthiest and, not coincidentally, best-educated among us now enjoy advantages over the middle class and the working poor unseen since the burnished indifference of the Golden Age. Among the most damning of these increasing disparities is access to a decent education.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The reputation of the Long Beach Polytechnic High School football team is such that when I casually mentioned the new reality show "4th and Forever," my husband, who played for Poly rival Lakewood High School, instantly (and rather alarmingly) rattled off five or six plays that contributed to Lakewood's defeat one year as well as the names of Poly's then-backfield, which included future NFL Hall of Famers Earl McCullouch and Gene Washington. Named the sports school of the century by Sports Illustrated, Long Beach Poly has sent more players to the NFL than any other high school, so it's a bit surprising that no one has done a documentary on its football program before.
SPORTS
October 23, 2009 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
There were teenage zombies running around St. Genevieve High in Panorama City this week as part of homecoming activities, their faces red and their T-shirts torn. Michael Jackson's "Thriller" is the homecoming theme, and that could be the motto for Southern California's only 7-0 football team. That's a remarkable achievement for any program -- especially one with seven losing seasons this decade. And it fits in with the success story of a Catholic school that has gone through a transformation, if not a resurrection, over the last 10 years.
OPINION
June 11, 2007
Re "LAUSD, the school bully," Opinion, June 7 This article denigrates and patronizes the teachers of Los Angeles. By publishing only one side of a complex debate about the future of Locke High School, this article shows the animus toward teachers and their union. If those favoring the Green Dot charters were honestly committed to reform, they would have provided a forum for all of the concerned parties to debate converting Locke to a charter school before the teachers voted. If the teachers were not offered all of their choices and the ramifications of their votes from their union and their employer before they voted, the results would mean little.
OPINION
August 10, 2006
NEARLY 80% OF THE STUDENTS at Richard J. Murphy School, a worn but clean building in a neighborhood that's slightly more worn and slightly less clean, are poor. The vast majority are minorities. Many of them come from risky neighborhoods. In other words, Murphy is like many schools in Los Angeles -- except that it's in the Boston neighborhood of Dorchester. And most of its students go on to astounding academic success.
OPINION
August 10, 2006
NEARLY 80% OF THE STUDENTS at Richard J. Murphy School, a worn but clean building in a neighborhood that's slightly more worn and slightly less clean, are poor. The vast majority are minorities. Many of them come from risky neighborhoods. In other words, Murphy is like many schools in Los Angeles -- except that it's in the Boston neighborhood of Dorchester. And most of its students go on to astounding academic success.
NEWS
May 2, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
All second-grader Tyrend Goins did was read enthusiastically from a story about a group of kids flying through space on a bus. But his teachers couldn't have been more astonished if the boy sitting cross-legged on the floor had himself begun to fly. "I don't believe it!" exclaimed Myron Jantzen, who was Tyrend's first-grade teacher. "Is this the same kid who wasn't reading last year?" Such outpourings--a combination of surprise, relief, pride and joy--are becoming common at James A.
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