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December 6, 2002 | Bob Baker, Times Staff Writer
Frank Abagnale, who is about to become America's most popular con man, is standing in a darkened auditorium in downtown L.A., scaring the bejesus out of a couple hundred business people. He has been talking in a calm, quick, flawless cadence for more than two hours, flashing his 140 slide projections on a big screen, listing every manner of fraud that could befall these men and women: forgery, embezzlement, bogus checks, identity theft.
February 21, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A deeply satisfying feat of storytelling, "Bless Me, Ultima" makes a difficult task look easy. It combines innocence and experience, the darkness and wonder of life, in a way that is not easy to categorize but a rich pleasure to watch. Taken from Rudolfo Anaya's landmark book, perhaps the bestselling Chicano novel of all time, "Bless Me, Ultima" presented certain obstacles. Though its protagonist is a very young boy, what he observes of life is not exclusively kindhearted. The story has the honesty of emotion you'd associate with having a 6-year-old as protagonist, but likely material for a Disney film this is not. More than that, "Bless Me, Ultima," set in the New Mexico of 1944, posits an age of wonders and miracles where magic realism informs young Antonio Marez's sense of how strange and unfathomable the world can seem.
July 23, 1996
A popular reading program for children at the San Fernando Library is combining guest performers with creative incentives to promote multiculturalism. "Read About Me," a twice-weekly program, has been popular among parents looking for educational--and free--ways to help their 6- to 12-year-olds have some fun and beat the heat. "It's really a fun time for the staff as well as for the kids," said library assistant Diane Gavin.
April 14, 1993
"Get It if You Can" and "Girls Also Use Sex" (March 25) featured students' responses to the Lakewood High School posse story. Only one respondent (Gloria) mentions the real possibility of contracting a venereal disease in indiscriminate sexual encounters. Do any of these boys, anxious to up their sex scores, practice safe sex? This should have been part of your article. LOUISE HAUTER La Canada
September 10, 1986 | Associated Press
Three gunmen kidnaped the top official of the International Lions Club in Lebanon and Jordan today, a day after an American educator was abducted in Muslim West Beirut on his way to play golf. Police identified today's kidnaping victim as Victor Kenou, a Christian Lebanese of Syrian origin. He was abducted at gunpoint at 9:35 a.m. near the French Embassy compound in West Beirut, authorities said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility.
April 3, 2012 | Maria La Ganga and Joel Rubin
A former student at a small Christian college opened fire in the middle of a classroom, police said, leaving seven people dead in one of California's worst mass killings. Authorities and witnesses described the suspect, identified as 43-year-old One L. Goh, as calmly spraying bullets around the classroom of Oikos University on Monday morning, seemingly without discrimination. "He stood up and began shooting," Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan said Monday evening. Goh allegedly then left the classroom and continued his attack.
July 9, 1998 | RICHARD WARCHOL
Thirteen high school journalists and two high school programs were selected Wednesday as winners and honorable mentions in The Times Ventura County and Valley editions' first high school journalism awards program. The winners, whose works were selected from hundreds of entries, are: * Nick Edwards, Adolfo Camarillo High School, feature story. * Luis Chavarin, Channel Islands High School, feature photo. * Eric Cheung, Thousand Oaks High School, cartoon/illustration.
November 5, 2000 | NANCY FORREST-YOSNOW
Two children's programs are being offered by the Fillmore Library to encourage greater interest in reading. During this election week, youngsters of all ages will have an opportunity to vote for their favorite books at the library as part of the Fillmore Friends of Library's "Books Get Our Vote" program. The votes will be taken from Nov. 6 through Nov. 11 at the library. Children who participate will receive a sticker and bookmark, according to library supervisor Cathy Thomason.
February 9, 2010 | By Yuriko Nagano
She likes Care Bears, doesn't wear makeup yet, and took her nom de plume from a character in the Disney classic "Bambi." And last year, 15-year-old "Bunny" became one of Japan's top authors of a genre called keitai -- cellphone -- novels. After getting its start as a tale told on tiny cellular screens, her three-volume novel "Wolf Boy x Natural Girl" has gone on to sell more than 110,000 paperback copies since its release in May, according to Starts Publishing Co. The "Wolf Boy" author, who took her alias from Thumper's friend Miss Bunny, started writing when she was in the sixth grade, after her parents bought her a cellphone.
June 12, 2010 | By Charles Solomon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Readers over 30 may not recognize manga artist Takehiko Inoue's name, but teens and twentysomethings in America, Japan, France, Brazil and 19 other countries follow the misadventures of basketball star wanna-be Hanamichi Sakuragi in "Slam Dunk," samurai Miyamoto Musashi's progress on the musha shugyo ("warrior's path") in "Vagabond" and the struggles of wheelchair basketball ace Kiyoharu Togawa in "Real." Inoue has sold more than 157 million books worldwide. Born in 1967 in Kagoshima prefecture, Inoue attended Kumamoto University but dropped out to concentrate on manga.
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