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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Myriam Ortiz, who entered the country illegally with her parents 19 years ago, finally has a chance to get a job, thanks to recent changes in federal policy. That prospect sent her to the Los Angeles Unified School District for the necessary documents - along with thousands of others, creating a backlog and new challenges for the nation's second-largest school system. Ortiz is among an estimated 200,000 current and former students who are potentially eligible for the "deferred action" program of the Obama administration.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Los Angeles schools Supt. John Deasy has told Board of Education members that he plans to resign in February, according to high-level district officials, including some who asked not to be named. The reaction from the office of board President Richard Vladovic left little doubt. “We are shocked,” said Mike Trujillo, a spokesman. “Dr. Vladovic is shocked, saddened and surprised.” Deasy, 52, was not immediately available for comment, but his departure would end the relatively brief tenure of a leader who made his mark with aggressive, sometimes controversial policies in L.A. Unified, the nation's second-largest school system.
NATIONAL
June 13, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
NEW YORK * Gov. George Pataki signed legislation that gives New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg control of the city's school system. The 1.1-million-student system will become Bloomberg's direct responsibility beginning July 1. The law also expands the Board of Education to 13 members. Currently, the system is run by a seven-member board and a chancellor. The mayor appoints two of the board members; the rest are appointed by each of the city's five borough presidents.
MAGAZINE
October 22, 1989
I would like to suggest to Poole that his next focus be the privatization of our public school system. If all primary and secondary schools were privately owned and operated, they could compete with one another for excellence in curriculum and instruction. This system would force schools to develop specific standards of performance and accountability ("production" in the business world) and may motivate parents to become more involved. By operating as a business, a privatized school system would reward our excellent teachers, weed out poor teachers and provide incentives for new teachers to become excellent teachers.
OPINION
May 5, 2007
Re "A drill can't fix LAUSD," Opinion, April 28 The rest of the world scores quick and easy political points by bashing our public school system. Virtually alone in the world of punditry, Sandra Tsing Loh identifies the successes of public schools. As a parent with children in public school, I love her work on this front, because school staff are properly more concerned with teaching than with rehabilitating their battered image. For readers who merely skim headlines, "A drill can't fix LAUSD" cynically echoes the conventional wisdom that our school system is broken beyond repair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1991
Regarding your editorial "Public Schools at the End of the Rope" (Aug. 15): The Times says that immigration and a record birth rate are having a negative impact on the public school system. In fact, these are not separate issues since immigrants (both legal and illegal) have the largest birth rate of any group in California. At this country's busiest obstetrics hospital, located at the USC-Los Angeles County Medical Center, 85%-90% of the births are to mothers who are illegal aliens.
OPINION
June 8, 2007
Re "LAUSD, the school bully," Opinion, June 7 Bruce William Smith shows what's wrong with our school system. Teachers who use their own resources and time to help students should be rewarded, not persecuted. The retaliation of the L.A. Unified School District is proof that it's more concerned with control of budget than quality of education. Students deserve better. JOE D'AUGUSTINE Los Angeles
OPINION
June 15, 1986
Atheism is also a religion--probably the most narrow, fanatic and paranoid of all religions since the atheist not only goes against the drift of the culture, but also against the witness of all he is as a human being. Practically speaking, atheism is now the officially established religion in the Los Angeles school system. JERRY SWEERS Claremont
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