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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1995
They've grown accustomed to their tax. Three years ago, Torrance homeowners were up in arms over a $25-a-year tax increase to maintain school property. This week, without so much as a peep from residents, the Torrance Unified School District voted unanimously to extend the maintenance assessment district for one more year.
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OPINION
July 10, 2013
Re "Closer to majority rule," Column, July 4 George Skelton's advocacy for making it easier to pass bonds and higher taxes is troubling, given how overtaxed Californians already are. California has the highest income tax rate, the highest state sales tax rate and, as of July 1, the highest gasoline tax in the nation. Even with Proposition 13's protections, property taxes in California are the 15th highest per capita in the nation. Skelton believes that "majority rule" is what July 4 is all about.
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NEWS
March 8, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Voters on Tuesday overwhelmingly rejected a $100-per-parcel tax that would have restored more than $900,000 in budget cuts to the Westminster School District. The vote, with all precincts reporting but without the absentee count, was 3,227 against the tax and 1,119 in favor. Board President Nancy Blumenthal said: "I guess people don't want to contribute to the educational future of their children. And this tax just came to about 30 cents a day."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
With a slate of bold and controversial budget proposals, Gov. Jerry Brown has placed a renewed focus on the state's struggling community colleges, the world's largest system of two-year schools that are often overshadowed by the University of California and Cal State systems. The governor's recommendations are aimed at keeping community colleges affordable, keeping classes accessible and moving students faster through the system to allow them to graduate or transfer to a four-year university at higher rates.
NEWS
December 5, 1985
A special school tax that failed to get the required two-thirds vote in the Nov. 5 election will appear again on the April ballot. Three new Board of Education members--David Destino, Debby Giesler Bowes and Nancy Bartlett--took office Tuesday and joined Mary Snaer and Selma Sax to unanimously approve putting the tax measure on the April ballot. Several residents at the board meeting opposed the action and said they will continue their fight against a special levy.
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | JOHN MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
Voters will be asked in November to approve a six-year extension of the $58-a-year school tax on each parcel of land in the financially troubled Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District. The tax brings in $1.6 million a year for the schools from the more than 27,000 parcels of land in the district. With little debate or controversy, the Board of Education this week unanimously agreed to place a proposition on the Nov. 8 ballot that would seek voter approval of the extension.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite its relative obscurity, the little school district of La Canada Flintridge last week kicked off a campaign for a proposed new school tax by bringing in state schools Supt. Bill Honig to personally attest to the need for the tax. Parents in the La Canada Unified School District had been preparing for a year to launch the tax proposal and managed to persuade Honig to appear after relentless lobbying in Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
With a slate of bold and controversial budget proposals, Gov. Jerry Brown has placed a renewed focus on the state's struggling community colleges, the world's largest system of two-year schools that are often overshadowed by the University of California and Cal State systems. The governor's recommendations are aimed at keeping community colleges affordable, keeping classes accessible and moving students faster through the system to allow them to graduate or transfer to a four-year university at higher rates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1988
Voters will be asked in November to extend for six years a $58 annual school tax on each parcel of land in the financially troubled Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District. The tax brings in $1.6 million a year for the schools from the more than 27,000 parcels in the district. With little debate, the Board of Education unanimously agreed to place a proposition on the Nov. 8 ballot to extend the tax, which is scheduled to expire June 30, 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ojai voters soundly defeated a school tax that would have added $150 to the annual tax bill of property owners for the next five years. In unofficial returns Wednesday, the parcel tax was supported by 46% of those who voted Tuesday, far below the 67% needed for approval. School officials said the tax was needed to keep class sizes small at the lowest grade levels, to save music programs and to pay teachers.
OPINION
May 24, 2010
Unwelcome message Re "Calderon urges assault rifle ban," May 21 I never would have believed it: The president of Mexico, standing on our congressional floor, impugning our immigration laws and policies. This from a president whose country has a far more draconian immigration policy than ours. This from the leader of country whose caste system drives its poor to our nation, so its can use us as its welfare system. All this, in front of Obama administration officials, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and a Democrat legislature that gave Calderon a standing ovation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2010 | Steve Lopez
Good morning. May I have your attention? Go ahead, enjoy your caramel macchiato while we chat, or is it an iced cinnamon dolce latte? I'm not going to kid you, folks. As my colleagues on the editorial board pointed out last week, there are lots of good reasons to vote against Measure E on the June ballot, the temporary $100 annual parcel tax that would raise $92.5 million a year during each of the four years it would be in effect for Los Angeles Unified schools. For starters, times are tough, and people don't want to dig into their pockets right now, especially since there's no citizen oversight written into the measure.
OPINION
December 9, 2009
They seem remarkably similar at first, the two cases involving leaders of publicly funded educational organizations in California who, within the same week, were reported to have racked up tens of thousands of dollars in inappropriate expenses over three years. Founder Steve Barr repaid close to $51,000 to Green Dot Public Schools after an internal review initiated by the charter operator found that he had been reimbursed for inappropriate expenses and lacked the required receipts for others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2009 | Howard Blume
School trustees voted Monday to place a parcel tax on the November ballot. The measure, if approved by a two-thirds majority, would raise $11.5 million annually for five years with the goal of offsetting reduced state funding for schools. Individual property owners within Long Beach Unified would pay $92 per parcel. Voters in the state's third-largest school system have previously approved two local school construction bonds that remain on the tax rolls. Money from the two construction bonds cannot be used to pay for ongoing operations, unlike the parcel tax. The sales pitch to voters will include the district's being recognized as one of the more successful urban school systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2009 | Rich Connell
A profound shift away from California's more transient and migrant-dependent past will soon produce the state's first generation of adults whose majority will be native-born, researchers at USC said in a study released Monday. More than 70% of Californians ages 15 to 24 were born and raised in the state, according to the report, "The New Homegrown Majority in California." By contrast, nearly two-thirds of state residents 45 to 54 years old were born out of state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ojai voters soundly defeated a school tax that would have added $150 to the annual tax bill of property owners for the next five years. In unofficial returns Wednesday, the parcel tax was supported by 46% of those who voted Tuesday, far below the 67% needed for approval. School officials said the tax was needed to keep class sizes small at the lowest grade levels, to save music programs and to pay teachers.
OPINION
July 10, 2013
Re "Closer to majority rule," Column, July 4 George Skelton's advocacy for making it easier to pass bonds and higher taxes is troubling, given how overtaxed Californians already are. California has the highest income tax rate, the highest state sales tax rate and, as of July 1, the highest gasoline tax in the nation. Even with Proposition 13's protections, property taxes in California are the 15th highest per capita in the nation. Skelton believes that "majority rule" is what July 4 is all about.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2005 | Jean Merl, Times Staff Writer
Stepping up his campaign against the governor's proposal for education spending in the coming budget year, California's elected schools chief called for higher taxes Monday as the best means to "stop starving our schools." Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2004 | Karima A. Haynes, Times Staff Writer
Responding to California's fiscal crisis, the Las Virgenes Unified School District has placed an $8-million tax measure on Tuesday's ballot to preserve current class sizes, electives and staff in the district's 13 schools. Under Measure E, all parcels would be levied $98 annually for four years, raising about $1.9 million a year for the district that serves Calabasas, Agoura Hills and Westlake Village.
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