Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSchools Administrators
IN THE NEWS

Schools Administrators

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1990
A Japanese-American attorney has complained that the superintendent of the Las Virgenes school district referred to "slant-eyed" Asians in an appearance before a civic group, and then refused her demand for an apology. Lyn K. Philipps of Calabasas, the attorney, said Supt. Albert Marley made the reference while showing vacation slides to the Optimist Club of Calabasas. Marley does not deny using the term, but said it was not meant to be derogatory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
A former Alhambra school administrator pleaded not guilty Friday to sexual abuse charges that were filed after a former student went public with her accusations and uploaded a recorded phone confrontation with the woman to YouTube. Andrea Michelle Cardosa, former vice principal at Alhambra High School, resigned in January after the video posted by former student Jamie Carillo went viral. Soon after, another woman came forth with her own sexual abuse allegations involving Cardosa.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1991
Although it denies wrongdoing, the California State University system has agreed to pay a total of $110,000 to six former teachers and administrators who sued the system, alleging they were forced out of jobs because of their feminist beliefs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Jason Felch and Jason Song
The president of Occidental College this week made an emotional plea for support to some 60 faculty members, saying his administration was "shell shocked" by criticism over its handling of student sexual assault allegations. Speaking for 20 minutes without taking questions, President Jonathan Veitch pleaded for reconciliation on campus, saying the controversy had taken a toll "on my health and my soul," according to several people who attended the meeting. He mentioned that his five-year contract was up for renewal, which suggested to some that he needed the faculty's backing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Kent Taylor, the administrator in charge of the financially troubled Inglewood school district, resigned Friday after the state Department of Education learned of tentative agreements he made with the teachers union without the authority to do so. Taylor's resignation comes two months after he was appointed by state Supt. of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson to lead the school system - which was taken over by the state in September when Gov. Jerry Brown approved legislation granting $55 million in emergency loans to help the 14,000-student district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1988
I applaud Davis for pointing out the excessive number of administrators in California schools. As a teacher, I know that excess administrators do more than take in extra money--they actually have a negative effect on the quality of our schools. Good administrators who are in needed posts enable teachers to do a better job through enabling, supporting, and instructing teachers. Redundant administrators in unneeded positions are a bother to teachers. They conduct unnecessary meetings and ask for superfluous paper work, thus taking teacher time from teaching and planning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2006
Jane Russo, a top city schools administrator, is now interim superintendent of the Santa Ana Unified School District, trustees announced Thursday. Russo, currently a deputy superintendent, takes over Aug. 1 from Supt. Al Mijares, who is ending a 12-year tenure to become vice president of the College Board's western region.
NEWS
September 22, 1990
John J. Lingel, former administrator of 67 elementary and junior high schools in the South Bay area of the Los Angeles Unified School District, has died. He was 70. Lingel, who retired in 1986 after 40 years with the district, died Monday of cancer. For the last four years he had served as consultant to the Center for Quality Education at Cal State Dominguez Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Kent Taylor, the administrator in charge of the financially troubled Inglewood school district, resigned Friday after the state Department of Education learned of tentative agreements he made with the teachers union without the authority to do so. Taylor's resignation comes two months after he was appointed by state Supt. of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson to lead the school system - which was taken over by the state in September when Gov. Jerry Brown approved legislation granting $55 million in emergency loans to help the 14,000-student district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Richard Winton and Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
Mark Berndt, the teacher accused of committing lewd acts against nearly two dozen elementary school children, was the target of a police investigation 18 years ago when a female student reported that he had tried to fondle her, authorities said. The alleged incident occurred in September 1993, though officials said the girl did not tell her mother about it until four months later, after seeing an episode of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" that explained the difference between "good touches" and "bad touches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2011 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Laura Custodio, dean of Porter Middle School in the San Fernando Valley, sprang into action after hearing that an eighth-grader was selling pot to other students. Without consulting police or parents, she asked a 12-year-old boy with a history of discipline problems to act as a decoy buyer and gave him a marked $5 bill. "I was pretty scared," the decoy, a seventh-grader, later testified in court. "She told me it was the right thing to do and I had to do it … and I didn't want to disappoint her. " The sting roiled a suburban campus better known for its academic achievement and led to a more than $1-million jury award to the seventh-grader and his family in a lawsuit against the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2011 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Last school year, Carson High School students skipped 1,926 days of class. This year, the school reduced that figure by 20%, thanks to an aggressive intervention program that included tracking down students and meeting with parents. Much of the credit goes to Sally Stevens, one of two school attendance counselors who are responsible for finding chronic truants. "They're the ones who deal with the hard-core students, and they find a way to get them to school," said Ken Keener, Carson's principal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
The Web never stops and it never forgets. On a recent Friday night, a UCLA student posted a video on YouTube. The young woman made the video, in which she complained about and mocked Asian students at UCLA, the day after the Japan earthquake. She took down the clip within hours of posting it. She was too late. By then it was being reposted and remixed, taking on a life of its own. By that Sunday, it had come full circle. UCLA officials watching the situation unfold noticed considerable surges in traffic on the university's Facebook and YouTube profiles, said Phil Hampton, a UCLA spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Administrators of the flagship downtown Los Angeles arts high school neglected to mention one crucial fact in their application materials: that enrollment is first-come, first-served for students outside the neighborhood. It was the latest snafu in the short, troubled history of the $232-million campus. That admissions information isn't explained on the school's website or on its application form. Instead, instructions note that families from other areas can apply between Feb. 7 and March 4. Principal Luis Lopez characterized the incomplete information as an oversight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2010 | By Howard Blume
Green Dot Public Schools, a leading charter school operator, is shutting down a campus because of low enrollment, financial pressures and subpar performance, officials confirmed Monday. The action prompted a daylong student protest Monday at Animo Justice Charter High School, south of downtown Los Angeles. The closure marks a first for locally based and nationally recognized Green Dot, which has 19 area campuses and one in New York City. The nonprofit Green Dot opened five independently run, publicly funded charters, including Animo Justice, four years ago, near long-struggling Jefferson High School in South Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2009 | By Lisa Girion
Kaiser Permanente, the state's largest nonprofit HMO, has been ordered to pay a former Valencia middle school administrator $5 million after its physicians misinterpreted signs of an impending stroke that left him partially paralyzed and disabled for life. An infection related to his subsequent treatment led to the amputation of both his legs. A panel of three arbitrators ruled Nov. 18 in favor of Timothy Howard, who said Kaiser physicians were negligent for failing to properly diagnose the cause of his episodic blindness, headaches and other complaints.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|