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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1990
The 1990-91 Torrance schools budget has been accepted by the Los Angeles County Office of Education, after school officials answered the county's earlier questions about the adequacy of their reserve fund. "What we showed was that we have had a number of funds with reserves," Torrance Trustee Owen Griffith said. "We really made no change in the budget, but I think we provided some explanations, and they said those explanations are OK."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2013 | Cindy Chang
Yosemite High School once offered six wood shop classes. Now there are three. Things got worse when a new high school opened in a neighboring district and many students transferred. Campus enrollment is down from 1,100 five years ago to about 700 today. School officials are now looking to a faraway place for salvation. As soon as next fall, Yosemite High could welcome 25 students from China who would pay $10,000 or more in tuition to enjoy an American public education amid mountain scenery.
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NEWS
January 7, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speaking to third- and fourth-graders in a suburban classroom, Gov. Pete Wilson said Monday his 1992-93 budget will increase spending for public schools, despite the prospect of another multibillion-dollar budget deficit. In what he called a "sneak preview" of the budget to be unveiled Thursday, Wilson said it will "fully fund" Proposition 98, the 1988 voter-approved initiative that guarantees roughly 40% of state general fund revenues for public schools and community colleges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2012 | By Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
On the menu at the Miguel Contreras Learning Complex cafeteria on a recent Friday was petite beef patties on whole wheat buns, a cup of roasted potato wedges, an apple and a carton of 1% milk. Together, the carefully portioned and paired foods amounted to about 730 calories - safely below a recently implemented 850-calorie cap for high school lunches. But walk out of the cafeteria, through the circle of giggling cheerleaders and the huddle of boys eyeing them, to the long line of students snaking around a corner and you'll find another option: the student store.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1994 | JON NALICK
The governing board of the Westminster School District has approved its 1994-95 budget, which calls for no significant cuts in programs or staff for the first time in four years. The Board of Education approved the $35-million spending plan without comment at its regular meeting on Thursday. It proposes a 2% raise for classified personnel, and no change in the current level of staffing or programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990
The Tustin Unified School District's tentative $44.7-million budget adopted by the school board this week includes a $2.1-million shortfall. District officials anticipate that expenditures will exceed income by $819,000. A state requirement for a 3% reserve is responsible for the remainder of the shortfall. "It's a shortfall when you just talk about revenues and expenditures," said Chief Business Administrator Paul Fisher. But the expected beginning and ending balances are positive, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1991 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
The Conejo Valley school board approved a $67.8-million budget Thursday night that includes spending $2 million of the district's reserves. During the 1991-92 school year, the Conejo Valley Unified School District will take in $65.8 million. However, the financial picture will be brighter than had been anticipated because 17,502 students showed up for classes--335 more than district officials had projected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1995 | BILL BILLITER
The Cypress School District Board of Trustees has approved a 1995-96 budget that allows room for adjustments during the school year, including possibly hiring up to five new teachers. The trustees, meeting Tuesday night, approved the new budget unanimously. It totals $18.4 million, compared to $17.7 million for the fiscal year ending June 30. Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990 | JOHN PENNER
Faced with enrollment figures that continue to slide, the Huntington Beach Union High School District has adopted a tentative budget for 1990-91 that includes a $1.4-million deficit. However, the district can easily cover the shortfall in the $78.2-million spending plan by tapping into the $3.2-million balance from last year, officials said. In addition, the district has $5 million stashed away in a special reserve fund set up in anticipation of such deficits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A feuding, frustrated Los Angeles Board of Education on Thursday ground out a precariously balanced, tentative budget that triggers 269 layoffs and hinges in part on improving student attendance. Most of the layoffs, part of an overall work force reduction that took about 1,000 jobs, are among the lower-paying, so-called "classified" jobs--including clerical and other office workers, custodians, maintenance workers and cafeteria staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Students from Western Avenue Elementary's special education classes sat in the shade and counted rings on "tree cookies" taken from redwoods on a recent field trip. "This is where learning comes alive and is more meaningful," said teacher Mysie Dela Pena about the Christensen Math Science and Technology Center in San Pedro. "We talk about a lot of these elements in the classroom, but this is where they get the experience firsthand. " The interactive life science classroom is a beleaguered survivor of the Los Angeles Unified School District's budget cuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2011 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Debra Engle went to a celebration of the city school district's arts program with a dark cloud hanging over her head. Like almost 7,000 other school district employees, Engle had received a preliminary layoff notice earlier this year and could lose her job by midsummer. For the last several years, the Los Angeles Unified School District has faced large budget shortfalls and the school board has approved cutting positions and programs to try to balance the budget. The nation's second-largest school system is facing an estimated $408-million shortfall, and many unions have agreed to their members' taking four unpaid days off. But, depending on the state's budget, district officials could still approve cutting jobs over the summer.
OPINION
December 1, 2009
Guests . . . not! Re "Crashers made it to the top," Nov. 28 The Secret Service's reaction to the breach of its own White House security during the recent state dinner appears to be obfuscation, or missing the point, or both, in concerning itself more with whether unauthorized guests broke the law rather than on how it happened. Whatever the interlopers' nonmalicious motivation -- a prank, a dare, a wager, publicity or social climbing -- they literally exposed a serious weakness in security, yet without tragic consequences to the president and a visiting head of state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Facing multibillion-dollar state funding cuts, school districts across California are asking residents to tax themselves to fund local schools. Parcel taxes -- some topping $2,000 annually per family -- have been proposed this year from Sebastopol to San Marino.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2009 | Kim Murphy
This misty stretch of wide sand dunes, like much of the Oregon coast, has always had an intimate connection to the forest. The old lumber mill for years was the biggest employer in town, after the fishing fleets. So it was with "horrible" regret that Siuslaw School District Supt. George Winterscheid announced recently that to plug an unexpected budget shortfall, wood shop was being canceled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2008 | Mike Anton, Times Staff Writer
Tucked away in a fold of Orange County's canyons, Silverado Elementary is an anachronism, a small-town school in a big-city district. With just 93 students and four teachers, the school is small by Wyoming standards, let alone Southern California. It's been this way for generations. Whether it will last, though, is in doubt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990 | JOHN PENNER
Ocean View School District trustees, grappling with a large budget deficit, this week approved a tentative budget that includes $800,000 in spending cuts. But deep additional cuts still need to be made before the board adopts its final 1990-91 spending plan in September, trustees said. As proposed, the $37.1-million budget would not result in staff layoffs or reduce the level of direct spending to schools, district officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2005 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Board of Education on Thursday approved a $13.2-billion budget for the 2005-06 school year that included $222.9 million in cuts to offices and programs, including an attendance incentive initiative and books for special education students, while increasing spending for school maintenance and preserving a 2% salary increase for teachers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An independent audit detailing the state's $60-million takeover of the Vallejo City Unified School District finds the former superintendent and her finance chief falsified budgets and duped board members to hide mounting financial problems. The audit says the district projected a 10% enrollment boost in 2003, worth $8 million in state funding, even though it was losing students.
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