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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
California school districts and the state appear to be on the verge of settling a two-decade squabble over the cost of special-education services. Under terms of a settlement still being hammered out, the state would agree to pay schools about $520 million, according to individuals familiar with the negotiations.
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HEALTH
February 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Erica Eihl speaks in a voice that her kindergartners can hear only if they are as quiet as the church mice in children's storybooks. And with a couple of squirrelly exceptions, they stay that quiet for 15 or 20 minutes - a near eternity - as Eihl guides them to use all their senses to consider a piece of apple, with directions such as, "Looking at the apple, look on the outside. Look on the inside.… Remember, keep it in your palm and just look at it. " When she asks for their input, she gets raised hands and comments such as: "It smells juicy and apple-y" and "I see little tiny white spots.
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BUSINESS
May 8, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Yes, we all know how lousy California schools are. Each day seems to bring new evidence of failure--poor reading scores, administrative incompetence, political infighting that is totally irrelevant to the central issue of how to improve learning by students. The business community complains--lately even more pointedly--about the need for better education, yet is in a quandary about how to achieve it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2013 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Over the years, it wasn't unusual to see a Southern California school dominate the Academic Decathlon national competition. After California teams took 19 national titles since 1982 - including the last 10 in a row - it was almost expected. But this year comes with a twist: The closest competition for Granada Hills Charter High School - California's first-place team - is another school from Los Angeles Unified. A change in the rules in the rigorous 10-subject event has allowed more than one team from each state to compete at the nationals, creating a freeway series between two of the strongest teams vying to bring the title back to Los Angeles once again.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a victory for schoolchildren and a defeat for the tax man, Gov. George Deukmejian signed into a law Friday a bill that would exempt school-sponsored youth groups from having to collect sales tax on items they sell. The measure, sponsored by Assemblyman Johan Klehs (D-Castro Valley), nullifies a decision by the State Board of Equalization that required most school groups to collect sales tax on many items they sell to earn money for after-school activities.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Proposition 187 is approved by California voters, most of its get-tough provisions eliminating government services to illegal immigrants would be scheduled to take effect immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1998 | MICHAEL BAKER
The governor has signed legislation championed by Assembly member Bob Hertzberg as a way to crack down on speeders near schools and to cut red tape that entangles traffic law enforcement. The bill written by Hertzberg (D-Sherman Oaks) and signed Thursday, eliminates the requirement of a traffic study in a school zone before police can use radar equipment to nab speeders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1994 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trustees of the Cabrillo Unified School District in the tiny coastal town of Half Moon Bay voted late Thursday before an audience of nearly 200 people to review their homework policies rather than abolish homework. With television cameras from around the country present, the board voted 3 to 1, with one abstention, to create a task force to review the district's homework policies, investigate how assignments are given and come back in January with preliminary proposals for change.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | ROBERT CHOWBD Times Staff Writer
Joyce Waite no longer lets her 9-year-old daughter walk alone to Fredrickson Elementary School in Dublin, even though the family lives only half a block away. "There's no way I let her walk alone," Waite said. "It's very upsetting when your child can't be a child anymore. You can't let them run around or go out and play." Elsewhere around the East Bay, other worried parents are showing up to collect their children at the end of the school day.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Proposition 187 is approved by California voters, most of its get-tough provisions eliminating government services to illegal immigrants would be scheduled to take effect immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday signed a $55-million emergency bailout and state-takeover plan for the nearly bankrupt Inglewood Unified School District. In addition to authorizing the emergency loans, the measure requires Supt. of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson to assume the duties of the Inglewood school board. Torlakson will work with the county schools superintendent to appoint a state administrator for day-to-day operation of the 15,000-student district. State Sen. Roderick Wright (D-Inglewood)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Johnnica Hababag planned to take two classes this summer so she could transfer from Los Angeles Valley College to a four-year school. But those plans were upended when she learned that the community college had all but canceled its summer session because of budget cuts. Hababag, an anthropology major, now will have to return to the two-year school in the fall. "This is definitely going to delay my goals," said Hababag, 21. "For me, living in the Valley, it's hard to get to other campuses, and even if I could, they're not offering the classes I need either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- Public school funds will probably be cut this year even if voters approve Gov. Jerry Brown's proposed tax hikes in November, the state's top budget advisor said Wednesday. That analysis undercuts a central premise of Brown's new budget plan: that his tax hikes would save schools from billions of dollars in reductions. Districts are likely to trim spending anyway, said Legislative Analyst Mac Taylor, rather than wait for voters to decide in November. "Districts have to plan for the worst case," said Taylor, whom lawmakers look to for nonpartisan financial advice.
OPINION
September 19, 2011
For better or worse, the stakes attached to standardized test scores are higher than ever. Now that schools can be taken over if their students' scores don't improve on the annual state tests, and now that the test results are considered in teacher evaluations, educators have more incentive to cheat, by giving students correct answers or erasing incorrect ones — or by looking the other way when others do it. Incentive, yes. Excuse, no. The rising...
NEWS
April 25, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
What's old will be new again when Disney California Adventure in Anaheim  reopens the unimaginative Mulholland Madness roller coaster June 3 with a new Goofy's Sky School theme. The Goofy overlay removes the giant Southern California foldout map and Caltrans roadwork signs from the off-the-shelf wild mouse ride that justly earned Disney California Adventure its on-the-cheap reputation. Photos : Concept art of Goofy's Sky School at Disney California Adventure Inspired by the 1940 cartoon short "Goofy's Glider," the ride's new flying-academy backstory follows the attempts by the clumsy anthropomorphic dog to teach a group of novice pilots how to fly. Naturally, things go awry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Granada Hills Charter High School emerged Monday from two days of intense competition ? and nearly a year of preparation ? as the winner of the state Academic Decathlon, grabbing the chance to represent California at the national level and joining other Los Angeles Unified schools in a strong showing. Los Angeles Unified School District campuses nabbed the top three spots in the competition, with Marshall High School in second place and last year's national winner, El Camino Real , placing third.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Schoolchildren from around the state take field trips to this historic gold rush town and relive what school was like in 1860. Classes are conducted for the visitors as they were when the Columbia school opened that year. The two-story, red-brick schoolhouse stands on a hill overlooking this hamlet in Tuolumne County. Students learn old-fashioned penmanship. They read from McGuffey's Eclectic Readers. They work math problems from 130-year-old arithmetic books.
NEWS
November 1, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A Monterey-based division of a New York publishing firm received $30 million worth of potentially good news Friday when state schools Supt. Delaine Eastin reluctantly recommended that the company be selected to supply the standardized tests that 4 million California students are to take next spring. Eastin's recommendation now goes to the state Board of Education, which will review tests submitted by CTB/McGraw Hill as well as two other major publishers before selecting one of them Nov. 14.
OPINION
February 15, 2011 | Jim Newton
Marlene Romero watched with growing anxiety as her 8-year-old son suffered through third grade at McKinley Elementary School in Compton. She was unhappy with his progress and felt trapped at a failing school. Then, taking advantage of a state law that allows parents to band together and demand change, she signed a petition: "I did it for a better education for my son. " Theresa Theus' daughter had liked preschool, but soon after enrolling at McKinley, she began saying she was bored.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Joe Deal, a photographer who documented Southern California's increasingly man-made landscape as a pioneer of an influential fine-art movement known as New Topographics, has died. He was 62. Deal, a former UC Riverside photography professor who also chronicled the building of the Getty Center, died June 18 of bladder cancer at a hospice-care facility in Providence, R.I., said his wife, Betsy Ruppa. In 1975, he was one of 10 young American photographers whose work was showcased in a landmark exhibition, "New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape," at the George Eastman House in Rochester, N.Y. The show, restaged last fall at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, identified a phenomenon: photographers who had moved away from romanticizing scenery and instead reported with detachment on how the American landscape was changing.
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