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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1994 | ROBERT BARKER
Huntington Beach City School District Trustee Shirley Carey wants the federal government to pay for the programs it requires the district to offer. She said much of the money that is intended for books, teachers and classroom supplies is diverted to a variety of programs mandated by the government.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2001 | From Times staff and wire reports
A coalition of educational organizations has launched a national campaign to raise federal funding for education. The 100-member organization, the Committee to Raise Education Funding, wants the Bush administration to raise federal support from the current level of 2 cents on the dollar to 5 cents within five years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1992 | ANNA CEKOLA
In an attempt to help "redefine this nation's priorities," Capistrano Unified School District trustees have unanimously approved joining a national campaign aimed at urging Congress to spend more on education. "With the 1992 presidential election behind us, one national fact is crystal clear: The Cold War is over and it is time to reinvest in America," Supt. James A. Fleming said in a report to the board.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1999 | From Reuters
A federal appeals court on Friday upheld a $2-billion annual federal program to subsidize Internet connections for schools and libraries. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals backed the Federal Communications Commission's decisions to allow the subsidies to be used to pay directly for Internet access as well as needed internal wiring at schools and libraries. Major telephone carriers such as GTE Corp. had argued that the money could only be spent on telecommunications services.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
A National Governors' Assn. task force adopted a six-point program Saturday for upgrading American education by the start of the next century. But the group skirted what many educators and politicians consider the thorniest scholastic problem of all--funding. The major points of the plan are expected to receive the approval of all of the governors attending the association's mid-winter conference, along with at least a qualified endorsement from President Bush.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1991 | GREG HERNANDEZ
The Santa Ana Unified School District has been awarded a $158,000 federal grant to fund a language program for 300 students who are not literate in English or their native language. The program, called Project Adolescent Literacy, is for sixth-graders on up. It is intended to develop reading, writing and speaking skills in the student's native language as well as prepare them for English instruction.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
President Bush is considering a plan advocated by his budget director to prevent any growth beyond inflation in the defense budget over at least the next three years, budget officials said Friday. That freeze in the defense budget would yield substantial savings from former President Ronald Reagan's proposed 2% annual real growth rate for the next five years. But despite the defense cutbacks, White House Budget Director Richard G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1989
The La Habra City School District has applied for $250,000 in federal funds to be used to promote English skills for kindergarten through second-grade pupils. "Our goal in the La Habra City School District is to have every student that comes to us with a limited English-speaking proficiency become English-speaking," said Ruth Fehr, assistant superintendent of schools. Funding would become available for the 1990-1991 school year. The money will go mostly for teachers and aides.
NEWS
September 29, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Asked what President Bush could do for schools, the sixth grade students in Becki Robinson's class at First Street Elementary School were quick with answers. They would like more computers, new reading books, grass on the playground, even a swimming pool. Ask their principal and teachers what Bush could do and the list grows longer and more complex. Though heartened by the spotlight on schools cast by Bush's historic education summit with all 50 governors in Charlottesville, Va.
NEWS
June 28, 1987
Federal money to help schools clean up asbestos is not reaching those with the worst problems, Rep. James J. Florio (D-N.J.) said. Florio released an internal Environmental Protection Agency audit that said the agency gave $387,000 to 10 schools with a total of 36 hours of human exposure weekly, while eight schools with a combined 19,173 exposure hours did not get the $391,000 they needed. Inhaling asbestos fibers can lead to lung cancer and other diseases.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
As part of last week's balanced budget deal, the Clinton Administration had to give up on a plan that would have provided $450 million to help build and modernize schools in California. Details of the budget compromise are still coming into focus. But administration officials confirmed Friday that they had to sacrifice the proposal to spend $5 billion over five years to help finance school construction projects in order to win Republicans' support for the budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Despite an appeal from Trustee Wendy Leece, Newport-Mesa Unified School District's board has voted to seek federal funds for a number of school programs. In a lengthy presentation, Leece argued that accepting money from Washington is akin to giving the federal government the keys to your car. Once that happens, she said, the government will become the driving force behind school district policy, subverting local control over academic programs.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration's ambitious plan to channel more money toward school districts with large numbers of poor students is faltering and a glimpse of where it might be headed could come today at a congressional hearing. The threat to the initiative comes from middle-class districts that could lose federal funds that would be funneled instead, under the Administration's proposal, to those with high concentrations of poor children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1994 | ROBERT BARKER
Huntington Beach City School District Trustee Shirley Carey wants the federal government to pay for the programs it requires the district to offer. She said much of the money that is intended for books, teachers and classroom supplies is diverted to a variety of programs mandated by the government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1992 | ANNA CEKOLA
In an attempt to help "redefine this nation's priorities," Capistrano Unified School District trustees have unanimously approved joining a national campaign aimed at urging Congress to spend more on education. "With the 1992 presidential election behind us, one national fact is crystal clear: The Cold War is over and it is time to reinvest in America," Supt. James A. Fleming said in a report to the board.
NEWS
January 16, 1987
Education Secretary William J. Bennett resubmitted to Congress a proposal to lift restrictions on the $143-million bilingual education program and allow local school districts to decide how to use the money. Bennett announced the action in remarks prepared for delivery at the Texas Education Conference in San Antonio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
The Santa Ana Unified School District has been awarded $1.3 million in federal funds to establish two three-year programs in bilingual education for Spanish-speaking students. The district, which has nearly 26,000 students with limited English skills, will use the money for programs designed to assist students during critical transition periods in their education.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Tuesday approved a Democrat-sponsored school aid bill that rejects most of President Bush's education plan, which the White House had proposed last April in an effort to seize the initiative on the issue. Although the Administration hailed the measure as a compromise, analysts said the bill, passed 92 to 6, was so different from Bush's plan that the White House will have a difficult time claiming any sort of election year victory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1991 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A biology teacher who does not want to teach evolution sues for $5 million. A school board trustee is poisoned with cyanide. The district attorney starts an investigation into possible campaign violations. A judge threatens to withdraw federal funding over a harassment case. The controversies just keep on coming in the Capistrano Unified School District. The district for the last several years has been hit with a seemingly unending stream of problems.
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