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NEWS
March 12, 1996 | JOHN JOHNSON and KATE FOLMAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Those who tout local decision making as a panacea for failing schools might take a lesson from two San Fernando Valley campuses trying to make positive changes while facing lousy choices. After months of acrimonious debate--punctuated by student sit-ins--North Hollywood and Van Nuys high schools dug in their heels and refused to adopt a year-round calendar to accommodate an impending flood of new students.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Faced with deep funding cuts and strong student demand, Santa Monica College is pursuing a plan to offer a selection of higher-cost classes to students who need them, provoking protests from some who question the fairness of such a two-tiered education system. Under the plan, approved by the governing board and believed to be the first of its kind in the nation, the two-year college would create a nonprofit foundation to offer such in-demand classes as English and math at a cost of about $200 per unit.
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BUSINESS
October 9, 2010 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
A sharp falloff in local-government payrolls, mostly at public schools, added an ominous new weight to the depressed labor market last month as the American economy lost 95,000 jobs and the unemployment rate remained at 9.6%. In the last monthly employment report before the Nov. 2 midterm elections, which many see as a referendum on the economy, the Labor Department said Friday that private employers added just 64,000 jobs in September ? not nearly enough to offset the large cuts in public payrolls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2011 | Anthony York
Joining the battle over California taxes, a group of billionaires and political insiders say they will place a $10-billion tax increase on the November 2012 ballot. The Think Long Committee, which includes Google Chairman Eric Schmidt, former governors Gray Davis and Arnold Schwarzenegger and Los Angeles philanthropist Eli Broad, says its proposal would provide $5 billion more for public schools every year and billions for public universities and local governments. Although the group has prepared a report outlining its proposals, it has not taken the preliminary steps needed to place the ideas before voters.
NEWS
April 12, 2003 | Mark Fineman, Times Staff Writer
As Saddam Hussein's regime continued to collapse into chaos Friday, the Bush administration announced that it has hired two private American companies to lay the groundwork for rebuilding Iraq's school system and usher in a new era of democratic local government in a nation that has spent a quarter-century under iron-fisted rule. The companies won two of eight contracts the U.S. Agency for International Development has offered to U.S. firms to rebuild postwar Iraq.
NEWS
December 26, 1995 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One recent morning, Ann Viar spotted Lamar Alexander strolling down her street, knocking on doors. She turned the radio up loud and retreated to her backyard. It wasn't so much that Viar is a Democrat and Alexander, the former governor of Tennessee, aspires to the Republican presidential nomination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1989 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major policy reversal that could have statewide repercussions, the Los Angeles County counsel has told the county supervisors that they do not have to consider potential school overcrowding in reviewing requests to build housing developments. Just four months ago, County Counsel De Witt W. Clinton said the opposite, telling the supervisors that they could reject zone changes for developments that threatened to overwhelm school districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Board of Supervisors Chairman Harriett M. Wieder said Wednesday that the county will not defy a state-mandated shift of local property tax revenue to fund California public schools. Wieder's decision effectively ends Orange County's opposition to the Legislature's controversial budget plan, which takes $2.6 billion in property taxes from local governments.
NEWS
April 19, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court said Monday it will decide whether the federal government can make it a crime to carry a gun within 1,000 feet of a school, a ruling that could put a major crimp in Congress' power. The case of a San Antonio teen-ager who took a handgun to school raises a potentially far-reaching issue of federal authority to combat crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000 | TONY LYSTRA and CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was well after the lunch hour and Clancy Priest figured he had better order pizza or face mutiny. Priest, who oversees the computer systems for the city of Ventura, had his staff working through lunch to battle a ruthless computer virus that ravaged computer networks around the world Thursday. The virus attacked businesses, government agencies, schools and home offices. Victims included the Pleasant Valley School District and biotechnology firm Amgen, the county's largest private employer.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2010 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
A sharp falloff in local-government payrolls, mostly at public schools, added an ominous new weight to the depressed labor market last month as the American economy lost 95,000 jobs and the unemployment rate remained at 9.6%. In the last monthly employment report before the Nov. 2 midterm elections, which many see as a referendum on the economy, the Labor Department said Friday that private employers added just 64,000 jobs in September ? not nearly enough to offset the large cuts in public payrolls.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2007 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
It's difficult to nail down the last time this antique city was considered cutting edge. Was it the 1850s, when a coffeehouse owner created the Sazerac cocktail? Or perhaps the 1940s, when a teenager named J.M. Lapeyre invented the automatic shrimp peeler? Whatever the answer, New Orleans was not defined by its spirit of innovation in the decades preceding Hurricane Katrina.
SPORTS
May 25, 2005 | David Wharton and Dan Arritt, Times Staff Writers
A high school relay team, among the fastest in California, is disqualified from a championship race because one of the runners is wearing different-colored underpants. In another meet, a triple-jumper has the best performance of her life nullified when the opposing coach notices a thin, beaded cord around her ankle, a violation of a rule prohibiting jewelry. As a result, her team loses, ending a 22-year unbeaten streak.
NEWS
April 12, 2003 | Mark Fineman, Times Staff Writer
As Saddam Hussein's regime continued to collapse into chaos Friday, the Bush administration announced that it has hired two private American companies to lay the groundwork for rebuilding Iraq's school system and usher in a new era of democratic local government in a nation that has spent a quarter-century under iron-fisted rule. The companies won two of eight contracts the U.S. Agency for International Development has offered to U.S. firms to rebuild postwar Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000 | TONY LYSTRA and CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was well after the lunch hour and Clancy Priest figured he had better order pizza or face mutiny. Priest, who oversees the computer systems for the city of Ventura, had his staff working through lunch to battle a ruthless computer virus that ravaged computer networks around the world Thursday. The virus attacked businesses, government agencies, schools and home offices. Victims included the Pleasant Valley School District and biotechnology firm Amgen, the county's largest private employer.
NEWS
January 6, 2000 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Invoking wartime images, Gov. Gray Davis on Wednesday issued a "call to arms" to young people to become teachers, proposing everything from cash bonuses to breaks on tuition and mortgages if they agree to work in lower-performing schools. Outlining his goals for 2000, Davis devoted half of his second State of the State speech to education, the cornerstone of his administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1994 | ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Laguna Beach High School students and staff members met with city officials Friday to discuss the racist flyers that were distributed on campus earlier this week and programs to promote racial harmony. Four student leaders spent an hour at City Hall with the police chief, mayor, school principal and school activities director, after student government President Sarah O'Rourke received Principal Barbara Callard's permission to set up the first-ever meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1997
Another year of a booming economy and low unemployment have left Orange County residents remarkably optimistic about the way they live. The shadows of the bankruptcy continue to recede, lingering mainly in the distaste with which county government is viewed. Those findings emerge from the Orange County Annual Survey, conducted by Mark Baldassare and Cheryl Katz of UC Irvine. For 16 years the surveys have been providing a valuable snapshot of the county and the feelings of its residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1997
Another year of a booming economy and low unemployment have left Orange County residents remarkably optimistic about the way they live. The shadows of the bankruptcy continue to recede, lingering mainly in the distaste with which county government is viewed. Those findings emerge from the Orange County Annual Survey, conducted by Mark Baldassare and Cheryl Katz of UC Irvine. For 16 years the surveys have been providing a valuable snapshot of the county and the feelings of its residents.
NEWS
March 12, 1996 | JOHN JOHNSON and KATE FOLMAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Those who tout local decision making as a panacea for failing schools might take a lesson from two San Fernando Valley campuses trying to make positive changes while facing lousy choices. After months of acrimonious debate--punctuated by student sit-ins--North Hollywood and Van Nuys high schools dug in their heels and refused to adopt a year-round calendar to accommodate an impending flood of new students.
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