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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1990 | JOHN PENNER
A budget-cutting plan that would force nearly 20% of the students in the Ocean View School District to switch schools next fall will be considered by the board tonight. The emotion-laden issue, marked by two weeks of parents protesting the proposed closure of Golden View, Haven View and Lake View elementary schools and radical boundary changes at other schools, was intensified Monday when the advisory committee making the recommendation refused to fully endorse its own plan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
May 3, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A federal judge has ruled that the Galveston public school system is desegregated, ending a civil rights lawsuit that was initiated in 1959. U.S. District Judge Sim Lake of Houston issued the ruling Friday, saying the district's history of compliance with a 1969 desegregation plan showed that the schools had fully integrated. In 2007, the League of United Latin American Citizens filed a complaint over the closure of a school with a heavily Latino student body. Lake, who approved that school's closure, wrote in Friday's ruling that he found no segregation in faculty and staff assignments, pupil transportation, achievement or special programs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1991
Jonathan Gaw's article "Integration Plan Draws Ire in Vista" (Jan. 11) attempted to explain what has become a snowballing problem in the Vista Unified School District for many years--the "ethnic imbalance" of Vista schools. This is not an issue of "rich people in north Vista wanting to keep Mexicans out of their neighborhoods," (as one parent said), and I truly resent that implication. If the new Mission Meadows elementary school had the radical imbalance that currently exists at Santa Fe/California school, I would still want my children to go to Mission Meadows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2009 | Richard Fausset
Griffin B. Bell, a Southern judge who earned both enmity and praise during the civil rights era -- and later served as a reform-minded attorney general under President Carter -- died Monday morning at an Atlanta hospital. He was 90. Bell died of complications from pancreatic cancer, said Les Zuke, a spokesman for King & Spalding, the Atlanta-based law firm that Bell helped build into a national powerhouse. Bell will be best remembered for his life in government, first as a justice in the U.S.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | Associated Press
A federal judge today dismissed a 26-year-old public school desegregation case against the Chattanooga Board of Education, ruling that the city's students no longer are segregated by race. District Judge R. Allan Edgar ruled that the reassignment of teachers earlier this year to racially balance faculty and staff removed the last stumbling block to the dismissal.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2005 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Finding Jonathan Kozol's house is a bit like looking for a Prohibition-era speak-easy. The directions, passed through a middleman, are a series of descriptions. You take a certain exit off I-95, make a left where the road ends, drive until you see a tall wooden fence abutting a low stone wall, turn onto a dirt lane and look for a red car next to a brown-shingled farmhouse built when this exurban stretch north of Boston was still British. Then you park and start hollering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1985 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Education Writer
The Los Angeles school district has thousands of black students concentrated in predominantly black schools in South-Central Los Angeles, evidence of what the NAACP calls "continuing acts of segregation." Meanwhile, in rapidly growing areas near downtown Los Angeles, the school system has even more Latino and Asian students in badly overcrowded schools operating year-round--evidence, Latino organizations say, of unequal treatment of these minority students.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Charles S. Scott Sr., 67, an attorney who helped integrate public schools nationwide by bringing suit in the landmark Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education case, died Friday after a long illness following a stroke. In 1951, Scott, his brother, the late John J. Scott, and the late Charles Bledsoe sued the Topeka Board of Education in U.S. District Court on behalf of Linda Brown, a black elementary school student.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1991 | JOHN PENNER
The Ocean View School District this week started holding neighborhood meetings to tell parents about a racial integration plan that would close one school and reorganize at least three others. The informal meetings, which began Wednesday, precede two public hearings that the Board of Trustees has scheduled for next month before it decides whether to adopt the integration proposal. Upcoming neighborhood meetings, all of which will begin at 7 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1992 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the relief of parents and teachers, the Board of Education on Monday spared key elements of the Los Angeles Unified School District's integration program, choosing to make up an $18-million funding shortfall with savings from anticipated cuts in employee salaries and reductions in transportation costs. The board voted 6 to 0 in favor of recommendations that would balance the integration program's $405.7-million budget for the 1992-93 fiscal year. Board member Roberta Weintraub was absent.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
In a decision that may herald a new era in the long struggle over racial integration in public education, the Supreme Court declared Thursday that officials may not use race to assign children to schools, even if the goal is greater diversity. Neither white nor black students may be turned away from a particular school simply because of their race, the court said in a 5-4 decision.
NATIONAL
June 2, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court heads into the final month of its term next week, and is expected to deliver major decisions on the future of school integration, the role of corporate money in political campaign ads and a taxpayer challenge to President Bush's faith-based initiative. There will probably be more 5-4 rulings and sharply worded dissents as the justices hand down rulings in the 26 remaining cases by the end of June and then leave town for the summer. If new Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
For the first time in a decade, the Supreme Court will revisit the legacy of a landmark: the Brown vs. Board of Education decision of 1954 that declared unconstitutional the racial segregation of public schools. Separate schools for black and white children are "inherently unequal," Chief Justice Earl Warren said in an opinion that helped launch the civil rights movement.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court agreed Monday to take up two cases that could mark a historic shift in the role of race in education and spell the end of official efforts to integrate the nation's public schools. The justices said they would hear appeals from parents in Seattle and Louisville, Ky., who say it is unconstitutional for officials to consider race when deciding which school a student will attend.
OPINION
August 30, 2005
Re "A Painful Lesson in Division," Aug. 28 I experienced racial integration as a teacher in a rural northwest Alabama 12th-grade school. The first year it was voluntary because there were all-black schools available to students. I had one black student in each of my five 11th-grade English classes. There were no problems. A few more joined them the following year. Everything went smoothly. Two black teachers joined our faculty the next year. Still no problems. When the all-black schools were closed, we were fully integrated and everything was as normal as it had always been.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2005 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Finding Jonathan Kozol's house is a bit like looking for a Prohibition-era speak-easy. The directions, passed through a middleman, are a series of descriptions. You take a certain exit off I-95, make a left where the road ends, drive until you see a tall wooden fence abutting a low stone wall, turn onto a dirt lane and look for a red car next to a brown-shingled farmhouse built when this exurban stretch north of Boston was still British. Then you park and start hollering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2004 | William Wan, Times Staff Writer
More than 50 years ago, Sylvia Mendez sat in the witness chair, a frail 9-year-old all but lost in the courtroom where her parents were suing to open up a "whites-only" public school in Westminster to her and her two brothers. School officials argued that Mexican American children weren't fit for "white" schools because they couldn't speak English. Sylvia Mendez was on the stand to prove that she could.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2003 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Roberto R. Alvarez, who made millions as an international produce distributor but made history at age 12 when he won a landmark court case to desegregate his San Diego-area grammar school, has died. He was 84. Alvarez was the lead plaintiff in a 1931 lawsuit against the school district in Lemon Grove, which had tried to move Mexican American students into a separate building at its grammar school. A court in San Diego County ruled that the school could not legally separate the children.
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