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NEWS
July 23, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public health authorities snapped into action Monday to tackle a virulent strain of bacteria that has sickened at least 6,333 people in southern Japan, most of them children believed to have contracted acute food poisoning from their school lunches. The culprit in Japan's worst food poisoning outbreak in a decade is the same strain of E. coli bacteria that tainted American hamburgers in the West in 1993, killing four people and making about 500 others ill.
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WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
The parents were furious: Why, they demanded, had Japanese officials raised the acceptable level of radiation exposure for schoolchildren near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant? By upping the limit, children were allowed on playgrounds containing higher levels of radioactivity than had been permitted before the nearby atomic plant was damaged by the devastating March 11 earthquake and tsunami, the parents said. While it may be impossible to rid the air of dangerous isotopes, they added, the ground is a different matter.
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NEWS
July 15, 1996 | Associated Press
Contaminated school lunches may have sickened as many as 1,228 elementary school children in central Japan since Friday, a health official said Sunday. Ninety-three of the children have been hospitalized. Officials suspect that children from 40 elementary schools in the city of Sakai were poisoned by E. coli--the same strain of bacteria suspected in hundreds of similar cases nationwide since May.
WORLD
January 16, 2011 | By Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
It was just another lunch by chef Kiyomi Mikuni: an umami consomme from scallops and shiitake mushrooms, a codfish and burdock risotto, pot-au-feu beef stew, and chocolate and saffron ice cream with a kumquat elixir. Mikuni's flair for fusing classical French cooking and fresh Japanese ingredients marked him as a pioneer from the first day 25 years ago that diners sat down in his Hotel de Mikuni restaurant in Tokyo. And, in the course of opening six more restaurants, he became one of Japan's most celebrated chefs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1997
Regarding the Feb. 16 article about cram schools for Japanese preschoolers: Sure, the Japanese culture can be viewed as being a trifle extreme, especially to our Western mind-set. On the one hand, they have a culture that takes education and manners very seriously--perhaps too much so. On the other hand, we have an American culture where teenagers can't speak even one sentence without using the words "you know" or "like" at least five times. I've seen our future politicians, lawyers and business leaders and frankly, I'm worried.
SPORTS
April 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jack Nicklaus announced a deal today with the Mitsubishi Corp. and Suntory Ltd. to build a network of golf schools in Japan. Nicklaus said he signed an exclusive contract giving Mitsubishi and Suntory the right to develop the schools. He said each school will have three holes and a driving range, adding that there also are plans for several driving ranges in urban areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
A teacher at a La Crescenta magnet high school will travel to Japan next month as part of an intensive program aimed at giving educators an in-depth look at the country and its people. John Laue, who teaches U.S. history, English and psychology at Anderson W. Clark Magnet High School with Emphasis on Science and Technology, said he is looking forward to seeing Japanese schools and businesses up close for the first time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
It makes perfect sense for the students and staff at Santa Susana School to aid quake victims in Kobe, Japan. They know the feeling. Last January, many of them suffered severe damage in the Northridge quake. Some lost their homes and still haven't moved back. "We went through that trauma ourselves," said Farida Nassery, the director of elementary programs at the private school in Chatsworth. "We really feel for the Japanese."
WORLD
February 23, 2010 | By Ju-min Park
The portraits of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il have been taken down from the classrooms in the run-down Tokyo Chosen No. 2 Elementary School. But a quick look into the teachers lounge reveals the Dear Leader in all his glory. The school for ethnic Koreans in Japan, one of about 60 in the country that are funded by North Korea, faces a delicate balancing act as money from the reclusive regime has decreased amid economic turmoil there. Since the 1950s, the schools have been run by the General Assn.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miki Kurosu's most vivid memory of Japanese high school is cramming for his university entrance exam. For more than six hours a night, he memorized Chinese dynasties, kings and queens of England, the dates of the Napoleonic Wars. He endlessly drilled himself in calculus, trigonometry and the "almost Shakespearean English" tested in the exams. "Why do I have to memorize these small details?" the 35-year-old manager at Nissan Motor Corp. in USA recalls wondering in frustration.
WORLD
February 23, 2010 | By Ju-min Park
The portraits of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il have been taken down from the classrooms in the run-down Tokyo Chosen No. 2 Elementary School. But a quick look into the teachers lounge reveals the Dear Leader in all his glory. The school for ethnic Koreans in Japan, one of about 60 in the country that are funded by North Korea, faces a delicate balancing act as money from the reclusive regime has decreased amid economic turmoil there. Since the 1950s, the schools have been run by the General Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
A teacher at a La Crescenta magnet high school will travel to Japan next month as part of an intensive program aimed at giving educators an in-depth look at the country and its people. John Laue, who teaches U.S. history, English and psychology at Anderson W. Clark Magnet High School with Emphasis on Science and Technology, said he is looking forward to seeing Japanese schools and businesses up close for the first time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1997
Regarding the Feb. 16 article about cram schools for Japanese preschoolers: Sure, the Japanese culture can be viewed as being a trifle extreme, especially to our Western mind-set. On the one hand, they have a culture that takes education and manners very seriously--perhaps too much so. On the other hand, we have an American culture where teenagers can't speak even one sentence without using the words "you know" or "like" at least five times. I've seen our future politicians, lawyers and business leaders and frankly, I'm worried.
NEWS
July 23, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public health authorities snapped into action Monday to tackle a virulent strain of bacteria that has sickened at least 6,333 people in southern Japan, most of them children believed to have contracted acute food poisoning from their school lunches. The culprit in Japan's worst food poisoning outbreak in a decade is the same strain of E. coli bacteria that tainted American hamburgers in the West in 1993, killing four people and making about 500 others ill.
NEWS
July 15, 1996 | Associated Press
Contaminated school lunches may have sickened as many as 1,228 elementary school children in central Japan since Friday, a health official said Sunday. Ninety-three of the children have been hospitalized. Officials suspect that children from 40 elementary schools in the city of Sakai were poisoned by E. coli--the same strain of bacteria suspected in hundreds of similar cases nationwide since May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
It makes perfect sense for the students and staff at Santa Susana School to aid quake victims in Kobe, Japan. They know the feeling. Last January, many of them suffered severe damage in the Northridge quake. Some lost their homes and still haven't moved back. "We went through that trauma ourselves," said Farida Nassery, the director of elementary programs at the private school in Chatsworth. "We really feel for the Japanese."
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | TERRIL JONES, Associated Press
Chinese are flocking to Japan as language students, but many come only for the big money they can earn--20 times the wages they would get at home--in jobs outside the classroom, immigration officials say. Some come in hopes of eventually getting to the United States. Many fall victim to unscrupulous language schools that charge inflated fees for bogus study programs and introductions to the Japanese sponsors they need to obtain visas. Foreign students in Japan are allowed to earn the equivalent of $1,000 a month, a fortune by Chinese standards.
WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
The parents were furious: Why, they demanded, had Japanese officials raised the acceptable level of radiation exposure for schoolchildren near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant? By upping the limit, children were allowed on playgrounds containing higher levels of radioactivity than had been permitted before the nearby atomic plant was damaged by the devastating March 11 earthquake and tsunami, the parents said. While it may be impossible to rid the air of dangerous isotopes, they added, the ground is a different matter.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miki Kurosu's most vivid memory of Japanese high school is cramming for his university entrance exam. For more than six hours a night, he memorized Chinese dynasties, kings and queens of England, the dates of the Napoleonic Wars. He endlessly drilled himself in calculus, trigonometry and the "almost Shakespearean English" tested in the exams. "Why do I have to memorize these small details?" the 35-year-old manager at Nissan Motor Corp. in USA recalls wondering in frustration.
SPORTS
April 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jack Nicklaus announced a deal today with the Mitsubishi Corp. and Suntory Ltd. to build a network of golf schools in Japan. Nicklaus said he signed an exclusive contract giving Mitsubishi and Suntory the right to develop the schools. He said each school will have three holes and a driving range, adding that there also are plans for several driving ranges in urban areas.
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