Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSchools Layoffs
IN THE NEWS

Schools Layoffs

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1991
It was sad to read that 980 teachers, nurses, counselors, psychologists and librarians received layoff notices from the Los Angeles Unified School District (Metro, April 15). Having worked on projects for that district at its central headquarters at Sunset and Grand, I would like to share with you one of my secret fantasies. The earth under the Sunset and Grand headquarters opens up and swallows the entire bureaucracy, together with all off-site regional offices. Instantly there is a surplus of funds for all on-site administrators, teachers, nurses, counselors, psychologists and librarians.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2011 | Steve Lopez
The news rippled across the campus Friday morning, and students were falling apart. They texted their parents and sought out one another to see if it could all be true. "I saw kids crying in the quad," said Portia Amofa, student body president at Hamilton High School in West Los Angeles. The students were finding out that some of their favorite teachers were among roughly 7,000 in L.A. Unified who had gotten layoff notices. In addition, the directors of two enormously popular and successful Hamilton programs, the humanities magnet and the music magnet, had been told by L.A. Unified that their positions were being eliminated.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1990 | MARY HELEN BERG
About 150 union members, teachers and parents packed the boardroom of the Orange Unified School District this week to protest the proposed layoffs of 79 classified employees. After the district signed a two-year contract with the classified workers earlier this month, Supt. Norman Guith gathered school principals and employees at the district office last week to announce the proposed cuts.
OPINION
March 2, 2010 | By Nicholas Melvoin
When the Los Angeles Unified School District laid off thousands of teachers last spring, the school where I teach, Markham Middle School in Watts, was decimated. Already one of the lowest performing in the state, Markham lost more than half its teachers. The number was so high because inner-city schools like ours tend to have a disproportionate share of teachers just starting their careers, and in last year's layoffs, the most recently hired were the first to receive pink slips. But at Markham, many of those teachers were extremely dedicated and hoped to build a career at the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1994
I am responding to your two letter writers ("Wrong People Laid Off in Orange Schools," Feb. 13). First of all, no one wants to see any layoffs of school employees; particularly those who most affect our children's education. I have three children attending Orange Unified public schools. The last thing I want to see is a cut in my children's educational services. The layoffs are the result of nine months of failed contract negotiations with the classified union. It should be noted, however, that the teachers' union did reach an agreement with our administration, as unpleasant as that agreement was for them.
NEWS
March 21, 1991
With a deficit next year estimated at $1.1 million, the Culver City school board has proposed laying off 30 teachers, counselors and school administrators and is looking at cuts in non-teaching staff as well. Six high school teachers, five elementary school teachers, two counselors, two nurses and two assistant principals are among those slated for layoffs. Notices to them went out before March 15, as required by state law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1990 | CARLOS V. LOZANO
A state-appointed arbitrator has ruled in favor of Simi Valley Unified School District in 10 of 11 grievances filed by the teachers union, district officials said Thursday. The Simi Valley Educators Assn. filed the grievances in March, claiming that the district violated its contract when it decided to lay off 32 temporary teachers and five school nurses to offset an $8-million budget deficit. The teachers union charged that the personnel cuts left the secondary schools understaffed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1990
The Beverly Hills school district has sent layoff notices to 60 teachers and other employees, prompting a community group to call on voters Tuesday to support a new property tax. The proposed parcel tax, if passed by voters in June, would generate $22 million for public schools over five years, enough to offset the lack of funds that threatens 48 full-time positions at the end of the school year and others in the future, school district officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1991
Seven students were detained for truancy Friday at Robert Frost Junior High in Granada Hills when a demonstration against proposed faculty layoffs led to vandalism of a handful of cars in the neighborhood. During the brief rampage, protesters broke the antennas and rear-view mirrors on two parked cars and smashed the window of a pickup truck, slightly injuring its driver, Los Angeles police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1991 | GREG HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At an emotional meeting attended by an overflow crowd of more than 400, the trustees of the Santa Ana Unified School District on Tuesday considered a controversial plan to establish a school-based health clinic that opponents fear could promote birth control. More than 60 members of the crowd lined up to speak on the issue after the district trustees voted on another emotional matter: employee layoffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ojai voters soundly defeated a school tax that would have added $150 to the annual tax bill of property owners for the next five years. In unofficial returns Wednesday, the parcel tax was supported by 46% of those who voted Tuesday, far below the 67% needed for approval. School officials said the tax was needed to keep class sizes small at the lowest grade levels, to save music programs and to pay teachers.
NEWS
March 16, 1995 | SHELBY GRAD and ALAN EYERLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even as they move to cut costs to deal with losses they suffered in the collapse of the county's investment pool, most Orange County school districts decided against sending layoff notices to teachers as Wednesday's deadline passed. Six of the county's 27 school districts have forwarded notices to more than 200 temporary teachers and full-time administrators. Several other districts received permission from teachers to delay the mailing of notices until April 15.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1994
I am responding to your two letter writers ("Wrong People Laid Off in Orange Schools," Feb. 13). First of all, no one wants to see any layoffs of school employees; particularly those who most affect our children's education. I have three children attending Orange Unified public schools. The last thing I want to see is a cut in my children's educational services. The layoffs are the result of nine months of failed contract negotiations with the classified union. It should be noted, however, that the teachers' union did reach an agreement with our administration, as unpleasant as that agreement was for them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1993 | MIMI KO
The Brea-Olinda Unified School District has unveiled plans to lay off teachers, librarians, high school counselors and other staff members and to eliminate programs if Proposition 174, the school voucher initiative, passes on the Nov. 2 ballot. District officials said Brea-Olinda will lose 10%, or $2 million, in funds if voters approve the measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1993
The state administrator for the Compton school system has ordered 38 layoffs, demoted several administrators and proposed a 10.5% salary reduction for teachers as part of ongoing efforts to balance a $91.2-million budget. All five financial managers and 33 part-time instructional assistants will lose their jobs in the Compton Unified School District. The financial managers controlled school accounts such as student council funds.
NEWS
May 13, 1993
Facing a $3-million shortfall for the 1993-94 school year, ABC Unified School District officials are considering employee layoffs, reduced campus budgets and the elimination of junior high athletics programs to balance their budget. In February, the school board approved $5.9 million in cuts that increased class sizes, reduced library and nursing services and eliminated pool and gym attendants. But last month the district learned it would lose $1.
NEWS
March 7, 1985 | THERESA WALKER, Times Staff Writer
The defeat Tuesday of a proposed property tax that would have aided the La Canada Unified School District will cause extensive layoffs of school employees, the district's superintendent predicted. Measure A, which would have authorized the tax, was approved by 56.8% of the voters, but a two-thirds majority was required to put the measure into effect. "There's no money. There's no choice," Supt. Donald Ziehl said about layoffs, which he said were "definitely going to happen."
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
Some of the parents attending last week's public forum on the Beverly Hills Unified School District's proposed budget cuts roundly criticized a proposal to reduce the staff by up to 90 positions. More than 200 people attended the Board of Education's public forum at Hawthorne School Wednesday to hear details of the district's plan to trim $2.4 million from a projected $3.7-million budget deficit at the end of the 1986-87 school year. "We don't want cuts," parent Bobbi Siegman told the board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Faced with a potential $137-million budget shortfall next fiscal year, Los Angeles school officials Monday began laying the groundwork for widespread layoffs and educational program cuts they intend to make by the end of June. Although Supt. Sid Thompson has not offered recommendations for specific budget cuts, he said at a special school board meeting that "there is no way we can avoid layoffs," and there will be "no way to keep the effects of the cuts from being felt at the school level. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antelope Valley Union High School District officials, trying to cope with an unexpected $4.6-million budget deficit, said Wednesday they have eliminated the need for immediate layoffs by getting a loan from the county, but will ask all employees to take a 7% pay cut in the next school year to avoid layoffs then.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|