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TRAVEL
August 25, 1996 | LUCY IZON
If your travel plans to Scotland overlap with a school vacation period, keep in mind that there are plenty of extra beds available in student residences at economical rates. Basic rooms are available for $23.25 or $26.35 with breakfast at the new Ardmore and Roseneath Halls at Customhouse Quay, Greenock--a 20-minute drive from the center of Glasgow and 14 miles from the Glasgow International Airport.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014 | By Jason Song
Starting this year, UC Riverside and all other University of California campuses will be tobacco-free, part of a nationwide trend. The campuses are following the lead of UCLA, which barred cigarettes and other tobacco products from campus last year. Former UC system President Mark G. Yudolf called for all campuses to be free of tobacco by 2014. In a survey of nearly 1,700 Riverside students and staff, 84% of respondents said they did not smoke or use tobacco products. Nearly 86% of people who responded said they were exposed to secondhand smoke on a regular basis.
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SPORTS
July 23, 1994
There seem to be two schools of thought about Tommy Lasorda: those who think he should stop managing the Dodgers and those who think he should start. D.M. CATES Ventura
OPINION
October 3, 2013 | By Charles Taylor Kerchner
Under the Los Angeles city charter, the mayor has no formal power over the Los Angeles Unified School District. But this has not stopped mayors - including Richard Riordan and Antonio Villaraigosa - from using the bully pulpit and the power of office. With his recent appointment of veteran Superintendent Thelma Melendez de Santa Ana as his deputy for education, Mayor Eric Garcetti has signaled that he, like his predecessors, is going to take a keen interest in education. However, instead of using all of his political energy on the school district, Garcetti and the city would be further ahead by connecting schooling to out-of-school learning, making Los Angeles a more educational place to grow up. As David Rattray, senior vice president of education and workforce development at the L.A. Area Chamber of Commerce, told me in an interview, "The mayor is perfectly positioned to connect the schoolhouse to the community and link what students know to high-paying jobs.
OPINION
August 31, 2004
Back in 1967, when John Burton and John Vasconcellos were young pups in the California Legislature, Ronald Reagan had just taken office as governor. The state had a $5-billion annual budget and fewer than 20 million residents. Reagan, after inheriting a budget deficit, signed into law what still ranks as the biggest tax increase in state history. This was before legalized abortion, before the California Environmental Quality Act, before Proposition 13 and term limits.
SPORTS
December 19, 2003 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Coach Pete Carroll, who has been sporting vintage Rose Bowl sweatshirts at USC practices this week, kept to the "Old School" theme Thursday. After the top-ranked Trojans completed a full-contact scrimmage, actor and USC alumnus Will Ferrell, decked out in a Trojan home uniform and helmet, was ushered onto the field. "Let's go streaking!" yelled some of the surprised players, in reference to Ferrell's nude jogging scene in the movie comedy "Old School."
NEWS
June 21, 2005
Regarding "An Outside Chance for Schoolkids" [June 7]: In 50 cities, Sierra Club Inner City Outings volunteers take youngsters hiking, camping and river rafting and engage them in conservation activities. Hooray for research that shows these activities build confidence and promote understanding of the environment. Shirley Weisman Los Angeles
NATIONAL
March 19, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
During the warm months, when students at Westport High School got too hot, they cooled down by moving to one of the many vacant classrooms on campus. It was one of the advantages of having 400 students assigned to a school that could hold 1,200. The downside became apparent last week, though, when the Kansas City school board voted to close Westport and 25 other schools -- nearly half of the district's campuses. Big-city districts shutter schools all the time. Cities such as Denver and Portland, Ore., have seen childless young families repopulate their urban cores and have adjusted accordingly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990
I am a retired elementary school principal from Illinois. While visiting California recently, I learned that the certain school board members in the Fountain Valley district are being challenged due to school closures. At first, I shrugged, thinking "that's politics." But--and this is a big but-- part way through the article the issue of "electromagnetic field" was mentioned. There is a comprehensive article in the July 9 New Yorker magazine that discusses an abnormal amount of cancerous tumors, leukemia, birth defects, etc. experienced by individuals living near or attending school under the cross-country wires.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1995 | DEBRA CANO
John B. Bushard Elementary School has finally met its date with the wrecking ball. Demolition is underway at the closed school to make way for 58 single-family homes. The Fountain Valley School District recently finalized the sale of the 10-acre site to the Presley Cos. for about $5 million. "We've been looking forward to this for so long," said Catherine Hacker, school board president.
SPORTS
March 14, 2013 | Eric Sondheimer
The decision by Long Beach Poly boys' basketball Coach Sharrief Metoyer to knowingly play an ineligible player, Kameron Chatman, on Tuesday night against Santa Ana Mater Dei in protest of a CIF eligibility decision is going to require major damage control. Metoyer inserted Chatman, a junior forward, into the state playoff game with 1:12 left. Poly lost, 83-63, so it had no impact on the game, but ignoring a CIF eligibility ruling is unprecedented in Southern Section history. That's because the potential punishment to a school can be severe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2011 | Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
Echo Lau drove to Whitney High School on a recent Monday evening to pick up her kids. She left with dinner. The student parking lot at the Cerritos campus is transformed every week into a congested food truck stop as eight mobile eateries attract the business of loyal followers, parents and students. But this isn't a typical stop for these catering trucks; this is a school fundraiser, in which a portion of the proceeds go directly to Whitney to help pay for a new multi-media center.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2011 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: My kids are signed up for day camps this summer. How else can I keep them busy while working at home? Answer: Summer schedules often lower productivity for self-employed parents. Abbey Fatica, president of Living Your Moment — a Columbus, Ohio, marketing firm specializing in home-based businesses — offered some tips: Explain to your children that you need an uninterrupted block of time to work each day. Line up activities for them, such as crafts or play dates, or get a babysitter during that time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Verdugo Hills High School has abruptly canceled a three-day "stay at home" field trip for seniors after a parent and officials questioned it. The idea was to get seniors off campus during the three days of annual standardized testing of underclassmen. Other schools fill the seniors' time with prepping for graduation ceremonies, special assemblies, senior picnics, career days, class photos, movies, make-up work — you name it. The academic rigor varies. Field trips during this period also are popular, but students elsewhere typically go somewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
It was a battle of the old school versus the new — a cook-off that pitted some of the city's veteran vendors of tacos and bacon-wrapped hot dogs against a new guard of gourmet food trucks known for fashionable menus and for sharing their locations via Twitter. But after the last bite was swallowed at the first L.A. Vendy Awards this weekend, tradition triumphed when judges crowned Nina Garcia the queen of L.A.'s street food scene. Garcia, who has served up supple Mexico City-style quesadillas and pambazos on street corners in Boyle Heights for two decades, beat out street vendor newcomers like the Grilled Cheese Truck along with old favorites, like East L.A.'s Tacos el Galuzo.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
During the warm months, when students at Westport High School got too hot, they cooled down by moving to one of the many vacant classrooms on campus. It was one of the advantages of having 400 students assigned to a school that could hold 1,200. The downside became apparent last week, though, when the Kansas City school board voted to close Westport and 25 other schools -- nearly half of the district's campuses. Big-city districts shutter schools all the time. Cities such as Denver and Portland, Ore., have seen childless young families repopulate their urban cores and have adjusted accordingly.
SPORTS
March 19, 2007 | Mike Penner, Times Staff Writer
First Notre Dame stopped winning the big ones, going 0-9 in bowl games since 1994. Then it stumbled against a little one, tiny Winthrop University, in the first round of the NCAA men's basketball tournament. Looking for an opponent it could finally handle, Notre Dame is now down to picking on high schools. Sorry as it sounds, Notre Dame has devoted several years to seeing that Indianapolis' Cathedral High School give up its longtime usage of the fighting leprechaun logo owned by the university.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1996 | KAREN KAPLAN
Think "multimedia CD-ROM" and you'll probably think of "Myst," "Doom" and other popular interactive games. But what about "How to Use Microsoft Windows NT"? No, it's not the latest arcade-style release for computer geeks. It's part of a trend among corporate training circles of substituting classrooms with CD-ROMs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2009 | By Victoria Kim
One morning in May 2008, an eighth-grader walked into Janice Hart's office at a Beverly Hills school crying. She was upset and humiliated and couldn't possibly go to class, the girl told the counselor. The night before, a classmate had posted a video on YouTube with a group of other eighth-graders bad-mouthing her, calling her "spoiled," a "brat" and a "slut." Text and instant messages had been flying since. Half the class must have seen it by now, she told Hart. Hart took the problem to the vice principal and principal, who took it to a district administrator, who asked the district's lawyers what they could do about it. In the end, citing "cyber-bullying" concerns, school officials suspended the girl who posted the video for two days.
NATIONAL
August 8, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Educators should be conservative when they consider shutting schools because of outbreaks of swine flu, or the H1N1 virus, federal officials said Friday as they released guidelines for school districts. While emphasizing that such matters are local decisions, the officials said a desire to prevent the virus' spread must be balanced with the fallout from school closures -- parents struggling to find child care, children left unsupervised, and disruption to education. "Once you close a school, as we saw last spring, that causes a very significant ripple effect because children need to stay home," Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said at a morning news conference with education and health officials in Washington.
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