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Schools Pakistan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran, Los Angeles Times
The girls were excited to return to their classrooms in Pakistan's Khairpur district after a summer break, eager to start their new lessons. But a few days later, monsoon rains hit, devastating much of Pakistan. The swelling waters damaged several schools run by Developments in Literacy, a nonprofit organization based in Garden Grove that has established 150 schools in Pakistan to educate students, mostly girls, in underdeveloped regions. Fiza Shah, the organization's founder, said she was worried.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran, Los Angeles Times
The girls were excited to return to their classrooms in Pakistan's Khairpur district after a summer break, eager to start their new lessons. But a few days later, monsoon rains hit, devastating much of Pakistan. The swelling waters damaged several schools run by Developments in Literacy, a nonprofit organization based in Garden Grove that has established 150 schools in Pakistan to educate students, mostly girls, in underdeveloped regions. Fiza Shah, the organization's founder, said she was worried.
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WORLD
September 24, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Religious schools in Pakistan have agreed to register with the government on condition the process is approved by parliament and they don't have to reveal their sources of funding. An umbrella group representing 13,500 madrasas met with Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz to resolve a standoff over a government drive to combat Islamic extremism and bring the schools into the mainstream. The government wants the schools to teach a range of subjects besides Islam.
NEWS
April 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
Six months after the army toppled his government, Nawaz Sharif was sentenced today to life in prison on charges that he refused to let a passenger plane land in Pakistan, endangering the 198 people on board. Judge Rehmetullah Jaffri found the former prime minister guilty of hijacking and terrorism. He was acquitted of attempted murder and kidnapping. Six other men, including Sharif's brother, who were also charged were acquitted of all charges. Sharif is expected to appeal.
OPINION
December 15, 2001
Afghanistan could become a canvas for the more benevolent intentions of prosperous, civilized nations. If the right amounts of resources and attention are devoted to its prosperity, Afghanistan (its condition arguably sustained by the long Cold War between two powerful, belligerent nations) could receive the benefit of the competence that those democratic, free-market societies often presuppose. The work could be done transparently, delicately, in full view of those communities and nations that have been questioning democratic, free-market competence.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Two Montana state legislators have filed suit in federal court against author and philanthropist Greg Mortenson, demanding that donations and proceeds from his book "Three Cups of Tea" be seized by the courts and placed in a trust for construction of schools in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The petition to certify a nationwide class action against Mortenson and his Central Asia Institute is the latest fallout from allegations that his best-selling book contained significant misrepresentations of how Mortenson came to launch his school-building charity, and from revelations suggesting that proceeds from the book went to Mortenson, not the charity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
It sounds like an art project that could swiftly go awry: A dozen writer-directors -- NYU students -- collaborate to turn a book of poems into a feature film. What could make it be a success? James Franco, of course. Franco is the tireless movie star slash literary figure, a writer and director in his own right, who is ready to throw his megawatt smile behind the most improbable of projects. To which now can be added "Tar. " The independently produced "Tar" is based on the 1983 book of the same name by poet C.K. Williams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2001
While I am saddened by the rash of hate crimes against Arab Americans, I must admit that after reading about the schools in Pakistan where isolated children are taught extreme hatred toward America and Jews, my tolerance turned to seething rage and tears of despair ("Pakistan's Muslim Schools Preach Dark View of U.S.," Sept. 19). We cannot fight terrorism until this kind of indoctrination comes to an end. And the West cannot make that happen; the international Islamic community must take responsibility.
WORLD
July 30, 2005 | Mubashir Zaidi and Paul Watson, Special to The Times
All foreign students studying at Islamic schools in Pakistan will be ordered to leave the country, President Pervez Musharraf said Friday. About 1,400 foreign students are enrolled in madrasas, or Islamic seminaries, some of which have been linked to militant groups. The foreign students "have to be removed from the country," Musharraf said at a news conference. "Even those having dual nationality. No one in the madrasas will be allowed to spread extremism and hatred in the society."
NEWS
December 3, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He said his name was Abdul Hamid. He said he came from Washington. And he said he'd been fighting for the Taliban. Among more than 80 Taliban fighters who surrendered to Northern Alliance forces Saturday was a grimy, light-skinned fighter who said he was an American. Abdul Hamid had a 15-minute conversation with a newsmagazine reporter as he sat with other injured Talibs in an open-bed truck and waited to be transported to a military hospital.
WORLD
December 13, 2011 | By Nasir Khan and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Pakistani police rescued about 68 students from an Islamic seminary in Karachi, several of whom were reportedly chained in a basement, denied food and pressured to join the Taliban, officials said Tuesday. It wasn't immediately clear why the students, some as young as 12 and some in their 40s, were subjected to such treatment. But police, who conducted the raid late Monday after a tip from neighbors, told local news media that some of the students were drug addicts sent there by parents or other relatives unaware of the horrible conditions.
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