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October 22, 1997 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was bad enough when high school psychology and physical education teacher Wendy Weaver lost her job as a volleyball coach in July after school district officials learned she is a lesbian. The next day, the district issued a vaguely worded memorandum warning Weaver, 40, that she also could lose her 17-year tenured teaching position at Spanish Fork High School if she spoke about her sexual orientation to anyone--on or off campus. Weaver was shocked.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2010 | By Jason Song
Concepciona Manuel-Flores couldn't answer many of the questions on a standardized English test in December, even though she says she's a straight-A student. "I had six or seven substitute teachers," the Markham Middle School seventh-grader said. "All we did in English was silent reading or the same assignments, over and over." Concepciona is one of the plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit filed Wednesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court on behalf of students at three of the city's worst-performing middle schools.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1995
In a decision that apparently resolves a knotty factional dispute, the California Supreme Court has ruled that former Paramount schools Supt. Richard Caldwell cannot sue the members of the city's school board who fired him in 1991. Caldwell, 69, who is white, claimed that he was dismissed from the job he had held for 13 years on the grounds of age and racial discrimination. The board replaced him with Michele Lawrence, a Latina in her 40s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2009 | Garrett Therolf
Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science has agreed to drop a $125-million claim that alleged Los Angeles County breached its contract by halting inpatient services at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center. In return, the university will receive county building space under favorable rental terms, a long-term payment schedule for its share of a multimillion-dollar age discrimination lawsuit payout and the ability to forge a new relationship with the county as the Board of Supervisors moves to reopen the hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1992 | ANNA CEKOLA
Capistrano Unified School District officials say they are shocked that Gov. Pete Wilson has included $1 million in his budget proposal to fight a lawsuit initiated by the district to seek equal funding for schools. "The value of a student in this district is far less than the value of students in neighboring districts, and indeed in the entire state," Supt. James A. Fleming said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has ruled that a Christian graduate school may proceed with its civil suit against state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig, whom school officials allege has violated the school's constitutional rights. In a 14-page opinion, Judge Rudi M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1986 | ROBERT SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
A judge this week dismissed five key arguments of a lawsuit filed by a parents' group over the Capistrano Unified School District's use of Project Self-Esteem, a program aimed at boosting the self-confidence of elementary school children. Claims that the program violated students' religious and privacy rights and that it constituted unauthorized psychological treatment of schoolchildren were summarily dismissed late Thursday by Superior Court Judge Robert H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1995 | TRACY WILSON
Lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union and the Simi Valley school district will meet March 2 to discuss settling a federal lawsuit against the school district. The settlement hearing was ordered by U.S. District Judge Irving Hill, ACLU attorney Marvin Krakow said, "to see if there is a way to resolve this without a lawsuit."
OPINION
January 1, 2007
Re "Judge delays plans for new school," Dec. 22 I am the attorney representing the Echo Park community group that successfully fought the Los Angeles Unified School District's attempt to start construction of a new elementary school in a dangerous location near Sunset Boulevard and Alvarado Street. Although the article described our lawsuit as a "small victory against the mammoth Los Angeles Unified School District," the victory is a major one for communities affected by school sites that are not justified by student enrollment projections and demographic studies, and that rest only on the shaky foundation of the district's improper environmental review process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1989 | STEVE PADILLA, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge Monday reaffirmed his dismissal of two lawsuits filed by three overcrowded Santa Clarita Valley school districts to block development in the rapidly growing valley. The ruling by Judge Kurt J. Lewin is the second setback for valley schools this month. On Feb. 16, the state Supreme Court struck down a voter-approved tax on new development to build schools in the fastest growing region in Los Angeles County. The suits were filed by the William S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Beverly Hills Unified School District is not liable for illnesses in a series of cases related to an oil-drilling site at the city's high school, a judge ruled Friday. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Wendell Mortimer ruled that the drilling site did not constitute "a dangerous condition" for which the district could be held liable under state law. The ruling moved the district "out of harm's way," said Supt. Kari McVeigh. Plaintiffs are expected to appeal the ruling.
OPINION
January 1, 2007
Re "Judge delays plans for new school," Dec. 22 I am the attorney representing the Echo Park community group that successfully fought the Los Angeles Unified School District's attempt to start construction of a new elementary school in a dangerous location near Sunset Boulevard and Alvarado Street. Although the article described our lawsuit as a "small victory against the mammoth Los Angeles Unified School District," the victory is a major one for communities affected by school sites that are not justified by student enrollment projections and demographic studies, and that rest only on the shaky foundation of the district's improper environmental review process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge has set a Dec. 15 trial date for a lawsuit challenging recent legislation that gives Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa some control of the Los Angeles Unified School District. The trial is expected to last only a few hours, with most of the arguments in written briefs, said Kevin Reed, general counsel for the district, a plaintiff. The suit contends that the law violates the state Constitution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2006 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles federal judge said Tuesday that he would allow a discrimination lawsuit filed against the University of California by a small Christian school in Riverside County to proceed. Acting in a case that is being closely tracked by educators and free speech advocates nationwide, U.S. District Judge S. James Otero rejected UC's effort to dismiss several major allegations in the suit and allowed it to move forward. The written order followed a tentative ruling in the case in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2006 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
After a lengthy and bitter legal battle, a split Rio School District board has agreed to a $1.4-million settlement with former Supt. Yolanda Benitez, who was fired nearly three years ago over allegations of mismanagement and an overly aggressive pro-bilingual agenda. "It's awful that we had to pay this amount of money, but it was necessary to stop the bleeding," said school board President Simon Ayala, one of two panelists who voted against Benitez's firing in June 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The parents of the two students killed in the Santana High School shooting in 2001 offered to drop their lawsuit against the school district if it agreed to hold a conference on school violence. The district has refused, saying it held forums on the topic. Michelle and George Zuckor and Mari Gordon-Rayborn sued the district, saying that officials failed to detect warning signs in the behavior of Charles "Andy" Williams, who opened fire on the Santee campus on March 5, 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1989
The city of Moorpark won a round Wednesday in one of its two lawsuits with the Moorpark Unified School District, but the two sides disagreed on the decision's importance. Ventura Superior Court Judge Edwin Osborne granted the city's motion to quash the announcement of a lawsuit the school district filed against the city. In ruling for the city, the judge agreed that the district failed to advertise its suit in a local newspaper, which is a legal requirement.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | LUCILLE RENWICK, Times Staff Writer
The state Department of Transportation has agreed to pay nearly $342,000 to the Downey Unified School District, which had filed a lawsuit to try to recover costs of protecting students from dust and noise from construction of the Century Freeway. The lawsuit settlement, announced last week, concluded 9 months of negotiations between the district and Caltrans. District Supt. Edward A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2005 | David Rosenzweig, Times Staff Writer
Amid the growing national debate over the mixing of religion and science in America's classrooms, University of California admissions officials have been accused in a federal civil rights lawsuit of discriminating against high schools that teach creationism and other conservative Christian viewpoints. The suit was filed in Los Angeles federal court Thursday by the Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2005 | Jason Felch, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer announced a $500,000 settlement Friday of a civil suit against a Huntington Park-based adult school accused of giving immigrants bogus high school diplomas after a 10-week course that cost hundreds of dollars.
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