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NEWS
November 15, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was a popular teacher, known for working past midnight on school projects and being a compassionate ally to her students. He was one of the special ones: a sixth-grader with whom she had recognized a kindred spirit when he entered her class, talented and intense.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 2013 | By Minh Dang, Los Angeles Times
The trouble started with the inheritance. Eight years ago, the economy was booming and Jane Osick was on solid ground. She had manageable student loans, a stable job and excellent credit. Then, in less than two years, she racked up $120,000 in credit card debt. How did a sensible schoolteacher dig such a hole? Blame it on the inheritance - a house she helped refinance when her mother was ailing and then remodeled after her mother died. "Looking back, what I should have done was stay out of it," said Osick, 48. "We should have let her lose the house, because what difference would it have made?
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BUSINESS
June 22, 2013 | By Minh Dang, Los Angeles Times
The trouble started with the inheritance. Eight years ago, the economy was booming and Jane Osick was on solid ground. She had manageable student loans, a stable job and excellent credit. Then, in less than two years, she racked up $120,000 in credit card debt. How did a sensible schoolteacher dig such a hole? Blame it on the inheritance - a house she helped refinance when her mother was ailing and then remodeled after her mother died. "Looking back, what I should have done was stay out of it," said Osick, 48. "We should have let her lose the house, because what difference would it have made?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2013 | Elaine Woo
A week before Christmas in 2003, a retired Los Angeles schoolteacher stood before a phalanx of news cameras and 250 reporters in a South Carolina ballroom and declared, "I am Essie Mae Washington-Williams, and at last I am completely free. " After more than 60 years, Washington-Williams had chosen to unburden herself of a secret: that she, a black woman, had been fathered by a white man - Sen. Strom Thurmond, the legendary South Carolina politician who had built a long Washington career as a champion of segregation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1992
Graveside services are pending for longtime Santa Paula schoolteacher David Bryce Kellogg, 57, of Ventura. Kellogg was diagnosed with cancer in 1989 and died of the disease at home Saturday, said his wife, Shirley. In the course of his 20-year career with the Santa Paula Elementary School District, Kellogg taught more than 500 students. He had been a teacher since 1970 and was a member of the California Teacher's Assn. Besides his wife, Kellogg is survived by two children.
NEWS
April 5, 1985 | Associated Press
The American teacher chosen to fly aboard the space shuttle will make the trip in January, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said today. The agency made the disclosure in releasing a revised shuttle launch manifest that lists 41 flights between now and the end of 1987. There are nine more scheduled this year, 15 in 1986 and 17 in 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1985
How pitiful that a "brave, young powerful man" could be reduced to a panic-stricken being by a mere spider. I just hope he's not a father, schoolteacher or in any way connected with children. JEAN RIBEIRO Big Bear Lake
BUSINESS
July 31, 2005
Regarding "Homes Sales, Median Price Hit Record Levels" (July 26): Where is this $219,000 median-priced home? May we please have a virtual walk-through? Maybe my schoolteacher daughter could afford this one. Thanks for the reality check. Marty Rauch Westwood
NEWS
August 7, 1987
A bench warrant was issued for South-Central Los Angeles schoolteacher Don Ray Moore, 53, after he failed to appear for an arraignment on 21 counts of felony child molestation. "We had expected him to show up there, but he didn't. We don't know what happened," said Lawrence B. Trygstad, one of Moore's attorneys. Prosecutors say they will seek to have bail set at $500,000 when Moore, who is on unpaid administrative leave, reappears in Los Angeles Municipal Court. Trial is set for Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1992
The following plea was received at the UCLA Biology Department from a local junior high schoolteacher: "We . . . are in desperate need of microscope slides with tissue specimens. We have no money to order things and are having a difficult time teaching biology without microscope specimens. Please help us." What a pitiful comment on our educational situation! Worse yet, we at the university are not in a strong position either and have no extra materials to share. This is additional evidence in the need for increased support of our public schools; they are, in fact, our future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2011 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Scott Svonkin, a senior advisor to Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca, took a narrow lead Tuesday over schoolteacher Lydia A. Gutierrez for a seat on the Los Angeles Community College District board in a race that focused on the district's troubled $5.7-billion construction program. Svonkin, 45, far outgunned Gutierrez in fundraising, but that did not translate into a clear advantage in early voting tallies. Since April 3, Svonkin's committees reported raising just over $299,000, including $220,000 from a single donor, the Los Angeles College Guild State PAC, a branch of the community college faculty union.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2011 | By Ann Marsh
Schoolteacher David Moehlman has a money problem. He has a lot of it — more than $1 million in savings accounts and mutual funds, plus half a million or so in real estate. And he has no debt. Moehlman, 44, didn't amass the vast majority of this nest egg through an inheritance or other windfall. He worked hard and made some good investments. And he took savings to an extreme. For example, he eats breakfast and dinner every day at fast-food places where he always orders off the $1 menu, and lunch is usually a 75-cent microwave burrito.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2009 | By Betsy Sharkey FILM CRITIC >>>
We don't go to Michael Haneke films for comfort, but to gaze through a glass darkly. That vision -- tense, provocative and unnerving -- is on full display in "The White Ribbon," which could be considered a culmination of this difficult director's brilliant career. Set in an ordinary German village on the eve of World War I, the film looks at the children who would survive that war and grow into the generation that would bend to Hitler's sway. Shot in black and white, which serves as both a statement and a style, Germany's foreign language Oscar entry has rightfully been collecting critical acclaim since it took the top prize at the Cannes Film Festival in May . Here the dramatic interplay of innocence, evil and human behavior so often on Haneke's radar has been joined by themes of guilt and responsibility.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2009 | Associated Press
washington -- Former First Lady Laura Bush on Monday expressed support for President Obama's decision to speak to the nation's schoolchildren, saying it was "really important for everyone to respect the president of the United States." In an interview with CNN, Bush, a former schoolteacher, said: "There's a place for the president of the United States to . . . encourage schoolchildren" to stay in school. Parents and others, she said, need to send that message as well. Bush also praised Obama's performance, saying that "he's tackled a lot to start with, and that's made it difficult."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Frank McCourt, the retired New York City schoolteacher who launched his late-in-life literary career by tapping memories of his grim, poverty-stricken childhood in Ireland to write the Pulitzer Prize-winning memoir "Angela's Ashes," died Sunday of cancer. He was 78. McCourt, who was recently treated for melanoma and then became gravely ill with meningitis, died at a hospice in New York City, his brother Malachy told the Associated Press.
OPINION
November 9, 2008
I was captivated by the series about the Gangster Squad. Though I have lived in Southern California for most of my life, I was never exposed to much of this information before -- except in movies such as "L.A. Confidential," "Chinatown" and "Bugsy." As a schoolteacher, I suggest that a course in recent California "hood" history would be great to offer on the college level. I applaud your efforts. Nancy L. Beckham South Pasadena -- A historic election three days away, stocks down thousands of points, global warming, the Middle East -- and almost half of your front page is news from the 1950s?
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | United Press International
Former Rep. Edith S. Green (D-Ore.), a schoolteacher whose Capitol Hill career spanned 20 years of championing education and equal rights, died Tuesday night of pancreatic cancer, Meridian Park Hospital officials said. She was 77. In 1955, Green introduced the first bill to require that men and women receive the same wages for the same tasks. The notion became law eight years later. Green was Oregon chairwoman for the presidential campaigns of John and Robert Kennedy.
OPINION
November 9, 2008
I was captivated by the series about the Gangster Squad. Though I have lived in Southern California for most of my life, I was never exposed to much of this information before -- except in movies such as "L.A. Confidential," "Chinatown" and "Bugsy." As a schoolteacher, I suggest that a course in recent California "hood" history would be great to offer on the college level. I applaud your efforts. Nancy L. Beckham South Pasadena -- A historic election three days away, stocks down thousands of points, global warming, the Middle East -- and almost half of your front page is news from the 1950s?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2008 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Milt Davis, an All-Pro defensive back for the Baltimore Colts who played on two National Football League championship teams and twice led the league in interceptions, has died. He was 79. Davis, who also played at UCLA and went on to a long teaching career in Los Angeles, died of cancer Monday at his home in Elmira, Ore., said his daughter Allison Davis-White Eyes.
WORLD
December 5, 2007 | Janet Stobart, Times Staff Writer
British schoolteacher Gillian Gibbons plans to get back to the classroom once she finishes celebrating her release from a Sudanese jail. "I'll be looking for a job," she said Tuesday morning during a news conference after her arrival at London's Heathrow Airport, where she was met by her overjoyed son and daughter, John and Jessica.
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