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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
When Barbara Bush walked into a reception here last Tuesday night for public television's new series "Learning in America," the first question she was asked concerned the vacancy for the top post at the National Endowment for the Arts. Livingston Biddle, a past chairman of the endowment, wondered how the selection process was coming along. "We're all waiting with bated breath," Mrs. Bush replied easily.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
When Barbara Bush walked into a reception here last Tuesday night for public television's new series "Learning in America," the first question she was asked concerned the vacancy for the top post at the National Endowment for the Arts. Livingston Biddle, a past chairman of the endowment, wondered how the selection process was coming along. "We're all waiting with bated breath," Mrs. Bush replied easily.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Set your VCR, make yourself comfortable, then watch, uninterrupted, "The Art of Piano" on KCET-TV from 9 to 11 tonight. Don't leave your seat. Whether you are a history-of-piano innocent or a longtime keyboard connoisseur, you do not want to miss any part of this thoroughly engrossing, endlessly delightful, wondrously informative show, the accomplishment of director Donald Sturrock, who co-wrote it with Christian Labrande. The documentary's high points are its cameo performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1990 | SUSAN REITER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was on Nov. 14, 1943, that the 25-year-old Leonard Bernstein, somewhat hung over (as the story has come down to us) but exceedingly well-prepared, stepped onto the podium at Carnegie Hall to conduct the New York Philharmonic as a last-minute replacement, launching what was to become a brilliant, globe-spanning and almost legendary career.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | WALTER PRICE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a remarkably simple 20-page will filed in probate court in Fairfield, Conn., composer-conductor-musician-author Leonard Bernstein directed that his multimillion-dollar estate be held in trust equally for his three children with income from the estate to be distributed quarterly to them or their descendants. Bernstein made an additional $1-million contribution to the Spring Gate Corp.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Want to know what pieces the late composer-conductor Leonard Bernstein played at a 1940s benefit for the Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee? Or what the performers wore during a Washington rehearsal of his celebrated "Mass"? The answers--Brahms and boogie-woogie, and some wore hot pants--along with a great many other details, are contained in more than 600 pages of FBI files compiled on Bernstein over three decades.
NEWS
November 2, 1999 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Monday ordered New York City to restore funding to the Brooklyn Museum of Art, dealing a setback to Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani's bid to sanction the museum for displaying works he called "sick stuff," notably a painting of the Virgin Mary adorned with elephant dung. In issuing a preliminary injunction against the city, U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1998 | DIANE HAITHMAN
No, it's not just that we don't have that mirrored ball for New Year's Eve. On the list of the Top 10 cities in municipal arts funding for 1998 (statistics provided by Americans for the Arts in Washington) Los Angeles ranks second--but New York beats everybody else by more than $95 million. And the city allots another $100 million annually for cultural capital projects. Each city has a different way of paying for arts and culture.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Want to know what pieces the late composer-conductor Leonard Bernstein played at a 1940s benefit for the Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee? Or what the performers wore during a Washington rehearsal of his celebrated "Mass"? The answers--Brahms and boogie-woogie, and some wore hot pants--along with a great many other details of Bernstein's life, are contained in more than 600 pages of FBI files compiled on the famed musician over three decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
It was, as Frank Hodsoll later phrased it, his "last gig on behalf of the arts." As he prepares to leave the office he has held for the last seven years, the chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts was at the Otis Parsons Institute Thursday to announce the 68 arts organizations nationwide who are this fiscal year's recipients of the federal agency's $19 million big-buck challenge grants.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1995 | Lewis Segal, Lewis Segal is a Times staff writer.
In a rehearsal room at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, a new Three Tenors concert is being readied for a waiting world. No, not those three tenors, but three slightly less celebrated vocalists named Dan O'Callahan, Michael Canales and Nova Safo, who are preparing to appear with the Barrio Symphony in a free performance at Echo Park.
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